Author Topic: New members, please introduce yourselves here!  (Read 187087 times)

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Offline Steve

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New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« on: August 06, 2004, 09:31:18 PM »
If you're a new member, please introduce yourself here! And don't forget to update your profile with your location, etc.  :)
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2004, 10:57:39 PM »
Steve,

Thanks for the opportunity to join the forum.  I'm happy to have discovered the forum and to be able to offer up--hopefully in an informative way--some of the knowledge about pizza making that has been rattling around in my brain for the last several years without much opportunity for outlet.   I discovered that most people are more interested in eating pizza rather than making it or understanding it.   I have tended to do it in reverse--understanding pizza, making it, and then eating it.  I sense that this is the way that most of the members of this forum operate also--constantly tinkering with ingredients and techniques until the finished products are perfect.

What I have also found at this forum is people who are not only passionate about the subject of pizza but generous with their knowledge, considerate and civil in conduct.  One cannot ask for more.

Thanks again.

Peter

Offline Steve

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2004, 08:19:18 AM »
Welcome, Peter! Nice to have you with us. I've enjoyed reading your posts and I hope you'll continue to share your pizza making experiences with us.  :D
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Offline Pierre

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2004, 05:52:00 PM »
That is true Peter. I am not on many Forums (mostly technical forums) but for the most part, the intonation of the comments are not kind or polite.

The members here in this Forum are in my opinion the best you can have anywhere. All are very exceptional in their conduct and in their readiness to pass on their experiences and knowledge. :D

Steve has set up a great platform here for us and we all have learned a lot about pizzamaking since.

welcome aboard ! :)

Pierre

Offline Pete-zza

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2004, 06:57:09 PM »
Thank you for your comments, Pierre.

I pondered whether to join the forum, but what sealed it for me was when I discovered that I was in the presence of one of the "Pizza Gods", Steve Kinski.   As some of you may have noted, I mentioned in a post while I was a "Guest" that I had for some time been writing an e-pizza cookbook.  That was done for my personal edification and amusement and, in a more practical sense, to help family members who had indicated a desire to make good pizzas at home and asked me for instruction and recipes.  I chose to call the e-pizza cookbook "The Passion of the Crust", an obvious takeoff on a well known movie but, in a more serious vein, reflective of the high regard in which I place the pizza crust.  In the book, I had written a section on some of Steve's work with multiple pizza stones, which I had gleaned from an artisanal breadmaking website.  To wit, I wrote:

"As an alternative to the single-stone baking method.... or to a unit such as the HearthKit oven insert, it is also possible to bake a pizza using two stones, an approach attributed to a pizza aficionado by the name of Steve Kinski.  Using the Kinski method, one stone is placed on the bottom rack of a preheated electric oven just above the bottom coil and a second stone is placed on the top rack of the oven below the top coil.  The two stones collectively serve to simulate a stone oven.  Once the stones achieve the desired temperature, a pizza to be baked is first placed on the lower stone and cooked for several minutes.  Then the broiler of the oven is turned on (or the broiler may be turned on when the pizza is placed on the lower stone) and the pizza is transferred to the top stone toward the end of baking on the bottom stone to continue baking under the broiler for a few more minutes, or until the crust is bubbly and crisp, even a bit blackened.  Of course, the specific times used will depend on the type of pizza to be baked and the number and types of toppings.  So, some experimentation will be required to master the Kinski two-stone method.  A variation of the Kinski method is to use two stones but preheat the top stone using the broiler and then bake the pizza on the bottom stone, which has been preheated by the bottom coil."

Since that writing, I have also taken note with great interest of Steve's work with trying to elevate oven temperatures above their normal rated value.

Maybe Steve can tell me whether I properly characterized his work as I set it out in my e-book, or whether I will be forced to resign from the forum in disgrace.

Peter


Randy G

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2004, 12:24:02 PM »
Hello guys. I started making my own pizzas back in 1997, and even worked briefly at a Godfather's back in the late 80s. I just started back up making pizzas, and am trying to find a formula I like. So far I have the crust down, just need to find a sauce I am happy with.

EDIT: my dough recipe is simple, just proof some yeast in 1/2 cup of sugared water, throw a cup of bread flour in a bowl, add about 4 teaspoons of oil, some salt, some sugar, mix up till oil is distributed, then beat in the water/yeast for about 5 minutes, then add flour till you get a dough ball. Let rise for an hour, punch down, store in fridge overnight. The next day let sit for an hour on counter, then roll out as minimally as possible to fit larger than a shortening coated pizza pan, roll up the edges, let rise for an hour, then start the cooking process. This makes a crusty outside and breadtype inside crust.

My old dough recipe when I first started back in 1997 was to throw some self rising flour in a small food processor, with salt, sugar, herbs and butter and a little bit of milk, process this up, then drizzle in enough water till I had the dough ball (using pulses to process it). Once in a while I'd add some Insanity Sauce to provide a spicy crust (I'm a big spicy food eater).
« Last Edit: August 08, 2004, 06:59:19 PM by Randy Garcia »

Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2004, 04:41:31 PM »
Randy:

Care to share your crust recipe ? ;D
You can post it under a new topic, so as not to fill up the New Members thread.
Ahhh, Pizza The Fifth Food Group

Offline Steve

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2004, 06:03:16 PM »
Hello guys. I started making my own pizzas back in 1997, and even worked briefly at a Godfather's back in the late 80s. I just started back up making pizzas, and am trying to find a formula I like. So far I have the crust down, just need to find a sauce I am happy with.

Welcome, Randy!  ;D
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Pizzer Eater

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2004, 07:21:30 AM »
Hello Steve and everyone at the forum.
I am an entry level "newbie" pizza maker but am an accomplished pizza eater.

I have been trying to make a decent pizza for a long time without much success.  My Mom and aunts made it look easy. Using standard ingredients and square cookie sheets they turned out a really good NY style pizza but I didn't pay much attention when I had the chance.

I found this forum a few days ago and have read old posts until my eyes teared and the info began to run together.
But I am enthused and am starting to collect what I need to apply some of the great advice I have read here.
I have been scoping out the local stores and made a trip to Sam's Club where I bought some instant yeast.  It seems that their hi-gluten pizza flour was also recommended somewhere on the forum but I haven't bought any yet.  The only other hi-gluten flours I can find locally are those made for bread machines.

When you look at a bag of flour how can you tell what the gluten level is?   I don't see where it states a number like 13% or 12%.

Could someone please explain the "windowpane" test or refer me to a previous posting on the subject?

We have a Sunbeam stand mounted mixer with dough hooks. Does anyone have experience with one of these? If so, will it work okay on this dough?

I found some 1/2' thick, 12" x 12" red quarry tiles at Home Depot (@ $.99 ea.)  but will have to get them cut to fit my oven properly.

Also shopping for a pizza peel and tomatoes.  This place looks like a good source for pizza peels and screens at a reaonable price.  Does anyone have experience with them or other suggestions?
http://www.abestkitchen.com/store/pizza.html

I am overwhelmed by all the different recipes, ingredients and techniques I have read here.  To start out I am thinking of following the basic recipe for New York Style Pizza at pizzamaking.com using the best ingredients I can find locally until I can get a decent and consistent pizza.  

Thanks to Steve for making this forum available and to all the great members that share their experience and advice.

I am looking forward to getting started and will update you all on my progress (if any!)

Any advice and comments for are more than welcome.

Offline Steve

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2004, 07:31:55 AM »
Welcome to the forum, Pizzer Eater!  :)

Most of your questions can be answered by using the "search" feature on the forum... most of these topics have been covered, like the Window Pane test.
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bangbang

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2004, 01:09:36 PM »
Hi everybody!

Offline Steve

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2004, 03:22:00 PM »
Hi Bang!
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Offline bigpix

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2004, 04:17:59 PM »
HI folks,
Greeting from Northern NJ which many of you know is at or near the heart of the Pizza world. I found my way here through various sources and am glad I did.
I guess I am a pizza eater first and a maker second. As a kid my dad would bring home a pie on a Friday night when he would be working late. This was before there was a slice joint on every corner of America. He would always bring it home from King Pizza on the Union/Maplewood border in NJ. What made the place so unigue was that it shared a parking lot with Joe's Pizza. The two owners were brothers who had split from the family biz (King) They both survived for years and years until finally only Joes was left standing. I was always a King loyalist but am happy that at least one is still around. I can still hear my dad say "that hit the spot" after his last bite.
Anyway, enough of memory lane. I started making pizza a coule of winters ago when my family bought me a Kitchen Aid mixer. I tend to make pie only in the cooler months since I have various time consuming interests in the warmer months.
I'm enjoying learning from you folks about methods, ingredients and favorite places. Maybe I'll join in on a pub/pie crawl too.
I'll share some of my methods and probably more important to you all, some of my favorite places for fine pie.
"See" you on the board!

Offline Pierre

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2004, 05:35:25 PM »
so many new members lately ! ;D

Can hardly keep track of all the new posts going on. Great to have you here and Welcome to you all..... :D

BigPix, BangBang, PizzaEater, Giotto, PeteZza, Randy Garcia

Offline giambra

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2004, 09:37:43 PM »
Hi all,
From Raleigh, NC.  Been following this forum for a while, guess its time to dive in and be an active participant.  The info here have helped take my pizza making to a new level (many thanks everyone), and the pictures of the pizzas are very pleasant.  The 6-in-1 tomatoes that I learned about here have made me stop trying new canned tomatoes I find in the gourmet food stores.  My taste testers think I can stop experimenting with the sauce and move on to other ideas.

One thing I've searched on here is sicillian pizza.  I just found a couple of appends without much discussion.   My interest in this comes from my years of living in Endicott, NY (many Italians moved there from NYC).  There is some pretty good pizza there.  One of my favorite places was the Original Italian Pizzeria on Washington street.  The NY style pizza there was good, but I tried the sicillian one day and was very impressed.  Got to be friends with the owner and he said that once people try the sicillian, they almost never go back to the regular pizza.  I'd like to describe that and see if I can't get any help duplicating it.  Be best if I start a new thread on that?

Thanks,
Tim (aka Pizza-brain)

Offline Steve

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2004, 07:55:47 AM »
Welcome to the forum Tim!

You should start a new thread about Sicillian pizza.
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courtney giambra

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2004, 02:44:20 PM »
hello my name is courtney giambra and i never knew that there were more giambra's in the world besides my family this is truely amazing to me because giambra is such a unique name so i figured i would write to u and say hello from a fellow giambra

Offline Rich

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2004, 04:59:35 PM »
Hi, I just found this great website today and thought I'd join the board.  My name is Rich, and I feel very honored and lucky to say I have lived in the Chicago area my entire life.  I have been making pizzas since 1984, had a little pizza "club" for a while, which was trying as many places in the entire area as possible, though I think it could take a lifetime!  Almost anyone who visits from out of town is immediately taken on the Chicago eating tour, of pizza, hot dogs, and Italian Beef.  ;D

When I think of pizza here, I do not think of only Deep Dish.  As many know, we are associated with Deep Dish, but we also have some awesome thin pizza, and Stuffed Pizza (my least favorite).  I honestly don't have a favorite type of pizza, as I love Deep Dish and thin (paper thin!).  East Coast "style" pizzas are great too.

By the way, I had Lou Malnati's last night.  :)

I am trying to duplicate a favorite pizza recipe of mine, from the restaurant Barnaby's.  They are a chain, with locations in other states, or at least used to.  Most of the chain have fallen by the wayside, diverting from the original recipe, which is very unusual.  The location in Northbrook, IL is the best.  However, I normally don't compare thin (which this is) to deep dish.  I am going to start a topic on this soon.  In the meantime, nice to meet you all.  I am ready to cook.

Lastly, I was looking at some of your Chicago deep dish recipes and for most of you, you'll be missing a key ingredient.  Lake Michigan water.  Just like New York's water is key to their pizza, our water is (supposedly) key to our pizzas.  

Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #18 on: August 29, 2004, 05:59:11 PM »
Welcome Rich. ;D
Glad to have you with us, looking forward to sharing your insights into pizza making.
Ahhh, Pizza The Fifth Food Group

Offline Pete-zza

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Re:New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #19 on: August 29, 2004, 07:35:17 PM »
Welcome aboard, Rich.

I'm looking forward to learning what you consider to be the best deep-dish and thin-crust recipes. ;D

As for water, I saw a segment on cable some time back in which Marc Malnati gave credit to the local Lake Michigan water for the high quality of his pizzas, and insisted that he couldn't replicate his pizzas outside of the Chicago area.  Also, one New York City restaurant (Naples 45) that adheres to the Neapolitan pizza-making standards states at its website that the water it uses in its pizza doughs matches the composition of the hard water used in Naples.  To do this, the restaurant apparently obtains the water for its pizza dough from a source somewhere outside of New York.  Prior to using the outside source, the restaurant imported the water for its pizza doughs directly from Naples.  Along the same lines, a Southern California pizzeria, Johnnie's New York Pizzeria and Caffe, in its efforts to introduce New York style pizzas to Californians, has gone so far as to duplicate the mineral content of New York City tap water to use in the making of its pizza doughs.  

Peter



 

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