Author Topic: pizza stone placement  (Read 9540 times)

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Offline November

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Re: pizza stone placement
« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2006, 09:21:12 PM »
Dave,

Your crust is probably coming out on the dry side because you're par-baking the crust, pulling it out, then baking it again.  Since you raise the temperature of the crust during your first bake, the inertia of high water vaporization has been overcome and you will begin to lose water during every moment you have the crust out of the oven, in addition to when you have it in the oven.  Add up all the minutes it takes you to bake the pizza from the time you put the pizza in the first time, to the time you pull it out the last time.  It's almost as if you're baking it for that total time since you'll be losing water out of the oven infinitely faster than the crust is baking, and assuming the crust reaches 140 F, 6.5 times faster than at room temperature.

- red.november

EDIT: I don't really have much more advice on baking surfaces.  If you had an unlimited budget, we could talk about your options again, for there are several that I didn't mention.  You can try cast iron to see if it gives you the results you're looking for.  However, I still don't know why you think the stone needs to be hotter though.  If the stone is 600 F, and you're baking your pizzas at 550 F, you're already providing a decent head-start to the bottom.  Moving the stone closer to the bottom of the oven provides an even greater advantage.  Setting the stone near the broiler to preheat while leaving the oven door cracked open should get the stone super hot, and I'd say that's about as good as you're going to get without exploring severely expensive options.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2006, 09:44:01 PM by November »


Offline canadave

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Re: pizza stone placement
« Reply #26 on: December 08, 2006, 02:54:25 PM »
That's probably true (about the par-baking drying out the crust prematurely).  I have to admit though--I'm nervous about putting the sauce and cheese on the skinned dough on a peel.  First of all, I'm worried about the dough sticking to the peel because of the amount of time I'd spend putting on the sauce and cheese.  Second of all, I'd be nervous about putting the pizza into the oven in that condition, because one false move and the whole thing is all over the oven.  Third of all, I always seem to have to prick a few bubbles in the crust, otherwise they'd agglomerate and turn the whole pizza into one big sauce and cheese pita :)

I don't know.  Maybe I'm just being paranoid.  I guess I'll try going the traditional route and dressing the pizza before it goes into the oven.

Thanks,
Dave

Offline November

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Re: pizza stone placement
« Reply #27 on: December 10, 2006, 10:53:00 AM »
Considering most people use the "traditional route" with favorable results, I would suggest trying it at least a few times.

More on a supply of silicon carbide:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4278.msg35865.html#msg35865

- red.november


 

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