Author Topic: Re: Modified, Cold Fermented Jiffy Mix Pizza Dough  (Read 3921 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Modified, Cold Fermented Jiffy Mix Pizza Dough
« on: January 22, 2007, 11:55:45 AM »
While I was shopping recently in a local Kroger’s, I stumbled across packages of the Jiffy pizza crust mix, at $0.39 a package. I was happy with the discovery of this product since I have long wanted to experiment with such a product but was unable to locate it in the stores near where I live (just outside of Dallas). What intrigued me most about the Jiffy Mix product on this occasion was the idea of making a cold fermented version of the Jiffy mix dough, just as I believe member pizzoid (Al) did recently with a Chef Boyardee brand of pizza crust mix.

When I studied the information on the package, I saw the following ingredients:

Wheat flour, animal shortening (lard & partially hydrogenated lard), yeast, contains less than 2% of each of the following: salt, whey, dextrose, leavening (baking soda, sodium aluminum phosphate), etc. (the rest of the ingredients included a preservative and the standard vitamin supplementation, which I have omitted).

What I couldn’t tell from the ingredient listing was the precise sequence of ingredients by weight. I didn’t see sugar specifically mentioned although I did see the dextrose, which is a glucose form of sugar that is less sweet than ordinary table sugar (sucrose). I also noticed that the leavening is similar to a chemical leavening system called WRISE, which is used in certain frozen pizza doughs and take-and-bake dough formulations. I recognized the whey as a mechanism for getting better crust browning without the lactose in whey being used by the yeast as food. I also wondered whether the yeast would propagate in the short dough preparation period (a matter of minutes), even using hot water, as called for in the instructions. It occurred to me that the yeast may have been added more for flavor than for its leavening function, and maybe in large amounts.

After looking at the nutrition information on the package, including total fat and protein per serving, I concluded that the flour was perhaps a low-protein flour, possibly along the lines of a cake or pastry flour, or possibly an inexpensive industrial flour with a protein level of around 9%, and that there was perhaps a high fat content in the mix. The instructions said to use cup water, and after subtracting estimated weights of the other ingredients in the mix, I estimated that the hydration was above 65%. Depending on whether one wanted to make a 12” pizza or a 14” pizza, as noted in the instructions, I calculated a thickness factor of about 0.09 and 0.07, respectively. In the course of going through the above analysis, I checked the nutritiondata.com website only to discover that there was nothing on the Jiffy pizza mix.

I decided that I wanted to make a 14” pizza. So, I calculated roughly what I would need to add to the mix in terms of water and flour to get to the dough weight corresponding to the 14” size. I decided not to add any other ingredients, like yeast or sugar, on the assumption that those ingredients were perhaps in ample quantities to survive a day of cold fermentation. Also, I had decided to use cold water right out of the refrigerator, rather than “hot” water as mentioned on the package.

To prepare the dough, I started by trying to sift the Jiffy mix ingredients. I quickly discovered that the fat in the mix, which was in the form of fairly large “pills”, would not go through my sieve. So, I quickly discarded the notion of sifting at that point and proceeded to make the dough in my KitchenAid mixer in my usual fashion. As I did this, I found the hydration to be on the high side, necessitating the addition of more flour until the dough was in a form that I could handle. Once done, the dough was lightly coated with oil and placed into a plastic container and into the refrigerator. The finished dough weight was almost 19 ounces, and the finished dough temperature was 64.5 degrees F.

The dough remained fairly dormant for a good part of the day but overnight the dough expanded by about 50%. I couldn’t tell whether the expansion was the result of the yeast or the chemical leavening, or both. But the dough looked quite normal, albeit on the soft side. After about 24 hours, I removed the dough from the refrigerator and let it warm up for about 2 hours. When time came to shape the dough, which I intended to put on a pizza screen, I saw that the dough was far too soft and too wet to shape and put on a screen. So, I decided to use a 14” dark anodized cutter pan. I oiled the pan liberally with oil, and shaped and stretched and pressed the dough to fill the pan right up to the edge.

I dressed the pizza with November’s pizza sauce, whole-milk mozzarella cheese, and the Kroger’s brand of pepperoni (which I thought, BTW, was very good). The pizza was baked in the cutter pan directly on a pizza stone (on the lowest oven rack position) that I had preheated for about an hour at about 500-550 degrees F. After about 5-6 minutes on the stone, I shifted the pizza out of the cutter pan directly onto the pizza stone for about another minute or two, to get better bottom crust browning, following which I moved the pizza to the upper rack position to finish baking, about another minute or two.

The finished pizza is shown in the photos below. The pizza actually turned out better than I thought but I wouldn't describe the crust as being a normal yeasted pizza crust. It was more like a biscuit crust with the usual flavors and textures that are part of a biscuit crust. The crust was perhaps something between a yeasted crust and a biscuit crust. I did detect a lot of sweetness on the palate, which leads me to believe that there is a lot of dextrose in the Jiffy pizza mix. A small amount of sugar may have been extracted from the flour by amylase enzyme performance over the course of about 24 hours, but I suspect it would have been quite small for the type of flour I think may be used in the mix.

As can be seen from the above description, I used a combination of research and personal knowledge of ingredients, dough formulations, and pizza making, estimates, educated guesses, and assumptions. To carry the exercise to the next stage, I will have to either get better information on the Jiffy mix and its ingredients or else I will have to do some trial-and-error to get what I am really after—in my case, a pizza dough that is more like a normal pizza dough that can be cold fermented and without having to completely reconstruct the Jiffy mix formulation by adding a bunch more ingredients. I want only to add more flour and, if needed, water (and possibly a pinch of yeast). Otherwise, I can make my regular dough almost as easily (but not as quickly). Maybe my objectice is unattainable because of what the Jiffy mix is and I am simply asking it to do too much.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 04, 2007, 03:27:04 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline ehlaban

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Re: Modified, Cold Fermented Jiffy Mix Pizza Dough
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2007, 02:07:19 PM »
« Last Edit: February 04, 2007, 03:27:49 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Modified, Cold Fermented Jiffy Mix Pizza Dough
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2007, 02:42:41 PM »
Ernesto,

Thank you. I had already found that information at the Chelsea Milling website, which was the first place I went to hoping to find more information than given on the package of the mix I bought. The information given at the Chelsea Milling website is a bit different than the information I had from the Jiffy mix package. For one thing, the amount of protein given on my package is 3 grams per serving whereas the Chelsea Milling website lists 4 grams per serving.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 04, 2007, 03:28:57 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Modified, Cold Fermented Jiffy Mix Pizza Dough
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2007, 03:43:45 PM »
Yesterday, I started a new experiment using the remaining $0.39 box of Jiffy pizza dough mix that I picked up recently at a local Kroger’s.

What I did with the dough was purely experimental because, as previously noted, the listing of ingredients and their relative weights on the Jiffy package left much to be desired from a reverse-engineering standpoint. But what I did was to add some King Arthur Sir Lancelot flour (sifted) to the mix along with about a 1/4 teaspoon of non-rehydrated ADY (not IDY) and a little salt and a bit of oil to compensate for the larger dough batch size. I used the non-rehydrated ADY because I did not know how much yeast was in the Jiffy dough mix and I didn’t want the dough to ferment at too fast a rate. I added no extra sugar because I discovered the last time I played around with the Jiffy mix that it already had plenty of sugar (dextrose). I used all of the water called for in the instructions, but absolutely cold right out of the refrigerator, and I added just enough extra water, also cold, to make a final dough that was fairly stiff but not too stiff. The dough was prepared using my KitchenAid whisk, flat beater and C-hook method. Nothing but the best for even a cheap dough .

The finished dough weight was 17 ounces--just enough to make a medium-thickness 14" pizza--and its finished dough temperature was around 66 degrees F, which I thought was just about right to keep the dough from fermenting too quickly. The dough went into a metal lidded container that I had refrigerated in advance to get it as cold as possible and allow the dough to cool a bit faster while in the refrigerator.

As of this afternoon, the dough looks fine. It has about doubled in volume and it is almost perfectly round, albeit flatter than when the dough ball went into the container. Even though I lightly oiled the dough ball before putting it in its container, the surface looks fairly dull and dry, which leads me to suspect that the mix contains a lot of low-protein flour, maybe something in the 9-10% range with the added KASL. The dough appears to have sucked up all of the surface oil.

I plan to take the dough out of the refrigerator a few hours before the Super Bowl game and finish it. By that time, the dough will have had about 27 hours of cold fermentation. If the dough can be shaped for baking on the stone, I will do that. Otherwise, I may use a combination of a perforated disk or perforated cutter pan (dark, anodized from pizzatools.com) and my stone. I would remove the disk/pan as soon as the pizza crust firms up and let the pizza get the bulk of its bake from the stone.

I also plan to modify the sauce I was planning to use by adding a bit of oil and smoke flavoring to the sauce, along with some finely diced pepperoni slices, to simulate the Chef Boyardee pepperoni sauce that has been discussed at another thread. I will also use some freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano and Pecorino Romano cheeses. That will be like putting lipstick on a pig  :).

Peter

Offline Randy

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Re: Modified, Cold Fermented Jiffy Mix Pizza Dough
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2007, 04:19:54 PM »
Over the years I have made a few things with the differant Jiffy mixes and have, each time, considered the product second rate. I must say Peter you certainly have beaten my findings having made the silk purse from the sow's ear.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Modified, Cold Fermented Jiffy Mix Pizza Dough
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2007, 07:38:16 PM »
Just before Super Bowl game time today, I finished the pizza using the Jiffy dough. I had no trouble shaping and stretching it into a 14” skin. The dough was fairly extensible but no more so than many normal doughs I have made, and the dough behaved perfectly normally on my peel. After the pizza was dressed, it was baked on my pizza stone, which I had preheated for about an hour at around 500-550 degrees F. The pizza was baked on the stone for about 6 minutes, whereupon I moved the pizza from the stone to the upper rack position where it baked for an additional 2 minutes.

I thought the pizza was very tasty but, as between this pizza and the first one I made using the Jiffy mix, I actually preferred the first one even though the crust had more of a biscuit like characteristic, whereas the most recent one was more like a normal pizza crust. But I don’t really have any complaints. When I calculated that today’s pizza cost me around $3.50 to make, it was a real bargain. If Kroger’s continues to stock the Jiffy pizza crust mix, I will buy a few more boxes to keep on hand to experiment with from time to time. I may even repeat the most recent experiment but with a higher hydration. Today’s pizza struck me as having a somewhat denser crumb than the first one, which was based on a dough that was very soft.

The photos below show the dough before shaping, and the finished pizza. 

Peter

Online Trinity

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Re: Modified, Cold Fermented Jiffy Mix Pizza Dough
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2007, 10:01:51 AM »
Fantastic!!! :chef:

 I mixed my cba kit crust by hand... I really could have used a mixer.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2007, 10:05:52 AM by Trinity »
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.