Author Topic: Little Black Egg  (Read 398603 times)

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Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1625 on: July 13, 2012, 06:19:32 PM »
toddster, thanks for the info.

So when it hits the temp I want, say 625 F degrees then turn it up full throttle.  So to get it up to 625 do you suggest at half throttle then when it hits 625 go for a full throttle?  Just curious how open you have the regulator in order to get the hearth temp the way you want it.

I wanted to have a bigger pie, that was my point of using a LBE type of device because my oven is kinda small but I can't find a big enough round kiln shelf as noted above.  But for now I'll stick to 16 inch round.  I can do a 15 inch. It's 5/8 thickness like you have.  Eventually maybe I'll pay up and get a 19 inch round from Bluefire molds.  But like you say I have to practice until I get my device figured out on how to make the pies like I want.


Thanks


Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1626 on: July 13, 2012, 07:47:38 PM »
toddster, thanks for the info.

So when it hits the temp I want, say 625 F degrees then turn it up full throttle.  So to get it up to 625 do you suggest at half throttle then when it hits 625 go for a full throttle?  Just curious how open you have the regulator in order to get the hearth temp the way you want it.

I wanted to have a bigger pie, that was my point of using a LBE type of device because my oven is kinda small but I can't find a big enough round kiln shelf as noted above.  But for now I'll stick to 16 inch round.  I can do a 15 inch. It's 5/8 thickness like you have.  Eventually maybe I'll pay up and get a 19 inch round from Bluefire molds.  But like you say I have to practice until I get my device figured out on how to make the pies like I want.


Thanks

What I do is get the stone to where you want it—for me 625F or so—then turn the heat way, way down (almost off). I go and open my skln, dress the pizza, then the pie goes out to the LBE, onto the stone, and then quickly I turn the heat all the way up for the bake.

I find that after one pie, the stone is usually 25F-50F cooler or so than I want, so I leave the heat at low-medium (after bakes) when I have multiple pies, and by the time I open the next skin and dress it, the stone is back up to temp...

But I've said it before--it takes a while, a dozen pies or so, before you will get a hang of it. It's hard to give hard universal advice as every setup is so different...

scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1627 on: July 13, 2012, 08:04:21 PM »
James, drill two holes in each side and run long screws through them to hold the shelves. Just make sure the holes you drill are level.

Just to confirm, you are using the top kiln shelf in your two shelf configuration for baking the pizza, correct?

Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1628 on: July 13, 2012, 08:39:28 PM »
toddster, I'm gonna try your method.  Won't make more pizza until next week but like you say I have to do this a bunch of times to really get the process down and to make sure it finally works right.

Scott, that's a brilliant way to have the stones stay in place without having to be concerned about sagging grills.  I am going to do that for sure.

Scott you are right about the way my kiln shelving setup is.

Thanks guys!

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1629 on: July 13, 2012, 10:57:33 PM »
James, drill two holes in each side and run long screws through them to hold the shelves. Just make sure the holes you drill are level.

This is what I did, too. Works like a charm. Use stainless screws, they hold up better—worth the extra money...

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1630 on: July 13, 2012, 11:02:32 PM »
Stainless steel 3" 3/8" dm bolts with SS nuts and lock washers ... FTW. 

Screws? Wha?  Don't use screws.



 
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1631 on: July 13, 2012, 11:07:13 PM »
Good catch, Brian.  I said screws but meant bolts.

Offline FVG

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1632 on: July 14, 2012, 01:48:06 PM »
Finally tried using both gas and wood on the grill which also has the Kettle grill attachment. From the grill set up picture I use just a 16 inch stone on the bottom and a 21 inch kiln stone on top which is about 3 1/2 inches above the bottom stone. With this set up the bottom stone was around 625 and the top stone was around 750.

Used just a few coals to get the fire started inside the Charcoal Holders, added several small wood pieces of wood to get the top stone hot, and then just enough wood to keep a small flame once everything was up to temperature. The burner was set quite low once heated up. Very good top color and browning without any bottom burning.

I will be experimenting with this setup some more in the next few weeks.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1633 on: July 14, 2012, 01:56:23 PM »
I'm firing mine up tonite. Maybe some corn on the cob, roasted in the husk under the dome on the top stone! I dropped the top stone to 3" from the bottom.
Jon

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Offline shuboyje

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1634 on: July 14, 2012, 02:59:42 PM »
Stainless steel 3" 3/8" dm bolts with SS nuts and lock washers ... FTW. 

Screws? Wha?  Don't use screws.



 

self drilling self tapping stainless tek screws would work, but you won't find those in most hardware stores.
-Jeff

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1635 on: July 14, 2012, 05:40:17 PM »
Looks damn fine, FVG, very elite NY style..!

Offline FVG

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1636 on: July 15, 2012, 11:35:23 AM »
Thanks - the goal of this cooking was to keep temperatures down as apposed to trying to get them high like in previous attempts and go for a NY style of pie cooked outside.

The addition of the wood really helped in keeping top and bottom temperatures balanced.

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1637 on: July 15, 2012, 11:43:03 AM »
FVG:  very nice.  VERY VERY nice.  I've been advocating this setup for a while now, and I'm tickled to see someone give it a try.  I don't have the money for the KPI, or I'd definitely being doing it as well.    I've been approximating this setup without the KPI, and it works pretty well.  Like you said, it's more a matter of keeping control of the temps, instead of just seeing how hot you can get it.

Very nice work!
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1638 on: July 16, 2012, 11:45:51 AM »
Aluminum will definitely melt in a deflector role, even heavy aluminum.

The Emile Henry stone is glazed cordierite.  I'm not too ecstatic about the glaze and the cordierite seems to be a little more conductive than usual, but I think it will work in an LBE.

Aluminum will melt over time if it is thin. I tried the popular aluminum pizza pan deflector technique in one of the ovens at the market. By the end of the 5 hour session, the pan was warping and had started to melt. For a less intensive cooking sessions, the aluminum can work, but I would not recommend thin aluminum if long sessions are what you want.

If you have not purchased the Emile Henry stone yet, I second Brian's thoughts on a kiln shelf. Look for a local clayworks shop/supplier. You can typically pick up a new, round kiln shelf for much less money than a store bought "fancier" pizza stone.
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1639 on: July 16, 2012, 12:48:38 PM »
What gauge steel is recommended for a diy kettle ring? Any thoughts on a preferred height? Stone type and thickness?  Thanks!
Do you think cutting the stone into 4 pieces and arranging them in the wave pattern would be beneficial?
« Last Edit: July 16, 2012, 12:53:14 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1640 on: July 16, 2012, 04:33:11 PM »
Interesting project Bob - if I were you I would model it after the modified KPI a la Jackitup.  Go with the same steel thickness the Weber has, same opening dimensions, mount bolts for the second stone so it rests about 3" above the hearth.
     Not sure about the wave thing - do you mean the Marsal oven?  If so, that would be difficult and tough to do, and may not be worth it. 
    Keep in mind that you will have to add more wood to the rear of the LBE at times if you are doing a sustained period.  So you will need the swing-up access hatch on the top stone to drop the wood into the charcoal basket, past the bottom stone.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1641 on: July 16, 2012, 04:46:15 PM »
Yes Brian, the new found Wave of the future on the Marsal.  ;)
Is that wood basket in the way of the deflector?
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1642 on: July 16, 2012, 04:49:22 PM »
So you will need the swing-up access hatch on the top stone to drop the wood into the charcoal basket, past the bottom stone.
Hmm, I was only wanting a 'lil wood on the top stone for the "deer in headlights" customers.   ;)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1643 on: July 16, 2012, 05:09:47 PM »
I'd use 16 gauge mild steel. It's a cheap , readily available, industry standard material that any sheet metal shop will have on hand.  You can even buy it in the hardware section of home depot and lowes, but without a slip roll you'll never form it.
-Jeff

scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1644 on: July 16, 2012, 05:40:38 PM »
What gauge steel is recommended for a diy kettle ring? Any thoughts on a preferred height? Stone type and thickness?  Thanks!
Do you think cutting the stone into 4 pieces and arranging them in the wave pattern would be beneficial?

Bob, I've put in considerable time researching a DIY KettlePizza insert.  Thin guage metal can support either the Weber lid or, if you get a large enough stone, a large stone. Flashing can be cut with tinsnips- that's what I've been recommending.  If you know you're going to be sticking to NY temps (below 800), then aluminum flashing is ideal- cheap and easy to cut.  As long as it's  quality flashing.  I've been reading reviews on Home Depot on aluminum flashing that's little more than foil- that wouldn't work.  If you want to work with Neapolitan temps, then the options are not quite so elegant.  Home Depot carries galvanized steel flashing, but you've got the threat of zinc poisoning.  I still firmly believe, that, if you know what you're doing, you can safely burn the zinc off galvanized steel, but everyone might not be comfortable with this route.  I wish I could find a cheap source for regular steel flashing, but I'm not having any luck there.  Copper flashing conductivity isn't ideal, although it will work, but it's the most expensive option.

The height of the insert depends on what you're comfortable launching into and the thickness of the stone. I would say that a 3" vertical gap is ideal, but can be a bit difficult to work with.

For the hearth, on a 22.5" grill, you'll want an 18 x 1/2 or 3/4 round cordierite stone (or firebrick splits) and, for the ceiling, a 21" round cordierite stone.

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1645 on: July 16, 2012, 05:50:12 PM »
Muriatic acid with lots of ventilation is the best way to remove the galvanized coating.  That is how we do it when soldering galvanized metal.
-Jeff

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1646 on: July 16, 2012, 05:58:21 PM »
Thanks Scott an Jeff,

I have a 'lil bodyshop so this is no problem. But if I didn't , one could easily source some thin gauge( above 16 as Jeff said)and simply pop-rivet that dude after cutting your opening. You can drill your pilot holes for the stone support screws before or after. Like you said Scott...sure beats the price they are charging for these simple little things. I'm gonna nose around for that source for rolls of regular steel flashing an let you know what I find.

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1647 on: July 16, 2012, 06:13:00 PM »
Thanks, Jeff, that's good to know.

Bob, the most important aspect about the DIY kettle insert is the fact that you don't rivet it together.  Once you start riveting and cutting out an opening, you've got an opening + the metal above it- which is going to be way too high.  One single strip of metal curved into a C is all you need.

With the right height on the flashing, you don't need support screws either.  You just get a big round 21" cordierite  stone (or square 21 x 1/4" steel plate) and sit it right on the flashing.  Just make sure that the open of the 'C' is big enough to launch a pie through.

Edit: steel might be better for the ceiling, due the fact that you can drill it easier, should you need to add some kind of air disruption aspects later (a la LBE).
« Last Edit: July 16, 2012, 06:15:51 PM by scott123 »

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1648 on: July 16, 2012, 06:19:38 PM »
Thanks, Jeff, that's good to know.

Bob, the most important aspect about the DIY kettle insert is the fact that you don't rivet it together.  Once you start riveting and cutting out an opening, you've got an opening + the metal above it- which is going to be way too high.  One single strip of metal curved into a C is all you need.

With the right height on the flashing, you don't need support screws either.  You just get a big round 21" cordierite  stone (or square 21 x 1/4" steel plate) and sit it right on the flashing.  Just make sure that the open of the 'C' is big enough to launch a pie through. 

That really is the cheapest way to go.. as far as looks, not so great.  I also have a concern about dimensional stability.  Once the heat gets up there, you could be seeing a lot of movement with this approach.  Sagging, warping, twisting, all things you don't really want when you've got an 800+ stone + a dome balanced on top of your LBE.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1649 on: July 16, 2012, 06:21:10 PM »
Well dang Scott...a man after my own heart!   :-D  (see my signature)
Thanks so much...glad we all have you around, that's for sure.
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


 

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