Author Topic: Little Black Egg  (Read 365395 times)

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scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1620 on: July 13, 2012, 04:05:34 PM »
James, you want to pre-heat the stone to the target temp, then turn the burner off until it's time to bake the pizza. Right before you launch, crank the burner to high.  After the bake is done, turn the burner back off again.  The heat you add to the hearth during the bake, should, ideally, be close to what the pizza takes out.  If the temperature of the hearth post bake is too high, then you need more deflection. If it's too low, then you need to leave the burner on between bakes and/or less deflection.


Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1621 on: July 13, 2012, 04:27:19 PM »
Note that Scott didn;t mean extinguish the flame -  just turn it way way down.  If the flame goes out and you have to relight it, that's NOT a good situation if you have any open fire going on anywhere in the LBE.  So be careful to leave a bit going.

All I can say re the burnt bottom, is watch your temps, anticipate, learn your LBE's response. 
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1622 on: July 13, 2012, 04:53:48 PM »
Here are some pics of it.  It's not the same shape as the Little Black Egg.  It's a Walk-A-Bout by Aussie.  I was gonna buy a Masterbuilt or a Weber but I had this in the backyard and kept on looking at it over a period of a few months and thought why not.  So I made one.  It's half red and half black and the shape is different.  I wanna call it the Little Red Corvette after Prince's song but it's not all red and not a car or Corvette shape but I like the name.

The stones are not in this thing. I took them out and put them away for safe keeping but picture a 16 inch round stone, two of them, one then some little kiln square pieces then another 16 inch on top of it.  I wanted a 17 inch at least or maybe more but the place I went had only 16 inch round and they are local and inexpensive otherwise I have to mail order and I notice I can not really find a 17 inch round anywhere, just 16 or smaller or a 19 inch and it's all mail order so for now this is good.

I really want bigger so I can make some 16 inch pizzas.  I don't think I'm so good to land a 16 inch on a 16 inch stone, I need 17 or bigger.


Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1623 on: July 13, 2012, 04:55:54 PM »
Scott and pizzaneer, thanks for the info. I'll follow your instruction. This is a first for me so it is trial and error.  The first pie was pretty good but too much cheese I think.  If I can keep on making good pies then this is worth it.

Unlike the Weber brand, this one has a cheap grill so it will sag. That's the only problem so far.  I can't find anything that fits that size grill as a replacement.

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1624 on: July 13, 2012, 06:13:59 PM »
...I don't need an 850 or 770 F degree stone.  I think at 650 or so it's good. What can I do to keep it at 650?  Just put the throttle at half even though it will take longer to heat up?  I read in this discussion that it's better to have a 20 PSI regulator and I was concerned my 10 PSI was not good enough yet the 10 PSI at full throttle easily hit 850 or more.  

Needing a 20 psi regulator? Absolute B.S.! As you saw, 10 psi is just fine...

650 is usually fine in my book, even maybe a bit high for a thicker hearth stone—for my 5/8" thick kiln shelf, I like more around 600F-625F.

Once your stone is at temp, try baking with the regulator turned all the way up for maximum top heat, then turn down after your bake. Keeping it at 650F will take time and experience to learn where your individual regulator will need to be set at. When cooking multiple pies, the pies will take some heat out of the stone. You may need to turn the heat up or leave it on high for a short time after each pie to heat the stone back up...

Don't worry, after 12-18 pies or so you will get the hang of your setup and learn what works just right for you and your LBE with your dough formulations....

Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1625 on: July 13, 2012, 06:19:32 PM »
toddster, thanks for the info.

So when it hits the temp I want, say 625 F degrees then turn it up full throttle.  So to get it up to 625 do you suggest at half throttle then when it hits 625 go for a full throttle?  Just curious how open you have the regulator in order to get the hearth temp the way you want it.

I wanted to have a bigger pie, that was my point of using a LBE type of device because my oven is kinda small but I can't find a big enough round kiln shelf as noted above.  But for now I'll stick to 16 inch round.  I can do a 15 inch. It's 5/8 thickness like you have.  Eventually maybe I'll pay up and get a 19 inch round from Bluefire molds.  But like you say I have to practice until I get my device figured out on how to make the pies like I want.


Thanks

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1626 on: July 13, 2012, 07:47:38 PM »
toddster, thanks for the info.

So when it hits the temp I want, say 625 F degrees then turn it up full throttle.  So to get it up to 625 do you suggest at half throttle then when it hits 625 go for a full throttle?  Just curious how open you have the regulator in order to get the hearth temp the way you want it.

I wanted to have a bigger pie, that was my point of using a LBE type of device because my oven is kinda small but I can't find a big enough round kiln shelf as noted above.  But for now I'll stick to 16 inch round.  I can do a 15 inch. It's 5/8 thickness like you have.  Eventually maybe I'll pay up and get a 19 inch round from Bluefire molds.  But like you say I have to practice until I get my device figured out on how to make the pies like I want.


Thanks

What I do is get the stone to where you want it—for me 625F or so—then turn the heat way, way down (almost off). I go and open my skln, dress the pizza, then the pie goes out to the LBE, onto the stone, and then quickly I turn the heat all the way up for the bake.

I find that after one pie, the stone is usually 25F-50F cooler or so than I want, so I leave the heat at low-medium (after bakes) when I have multiple pies, and by the time I open the next skin and dress it, the stone is back up to temp...

But I've said it before--it takes a while, a dozen pies or so, before you will get a hang of it. It's hard to give hard universal advice as every setup is so different...

scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1627 on: July 13, 2012, 08:04:21 PM »
James, drill two holes in each side and run long screws through them to hold the shelves. Just make sure the holes you drill are level.

Just to confirm, you are using the top kiln shelf in your two shelf configuration for baking the pizza, correct?

Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1628 on: July 13, 2012, 08:39:28 PM »
toddster, I'm gonna try your method.  Won't make more pizza until next week but like you say I have to do this a bunch of times to really get the process down and to make sure it finally works right.

Scott, that's a brilliant way to have the stones stay in place without having to be concerned about sagging grills.  I am going to do that for sure.

Scott you are right about the way my kiln shelving setup is.

Thanks guys!

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1629 on: July 13, 2012, 10:57:33 PM »
James, drill two holes in each side and run long screws through them to hold the shelves. Just make sure the holes you drill are level.

This is what I did, too. Works like a charm. Use stainless screws, they hold up better—worth the extra money...


Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1630 on: July 13, 2012, 11:02:32 PM »
Stainless steel 3" 3/8" dm bolts with SS nuts and lock washers ... FTW. 

Screws? Wha?  Don't use screws.



 
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1631 on: July 13, 2012, 11:07:13 PM »
Good catch, Brian.  I said screws but meant bolts.

Offline FVG

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1632 on: July 14, 2012, 01:48:06 PM »
Finally tried using both gas and wood on the grill which also has the Kettle grill attachment. From the grill set up picture I use just a 16 inch stone on the bottom and a 21 inch kiln stone on top which is about 3 1/2 inches above the bottom stone. With this set up the bottom stone was around 625 and the top stone was around 750.

Used just a few coals to get the fire started inside the Charcoal Holders, added several small wood pieces of wood to get the top stone hot, and then just enough wood to keep a small flame once everything was up to temperature. The burner was set quite low once heated up. Very good top color and browning without any bottom burning.

I will be experimenting with this setup some more in the next few weeks.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1633 on: July 14, 2012, 01:56:23 PM »
I'm firing mine up tonite. Maybe some corn on the cob, roasted in the husk under the dome on the top stone! I dropped the top stone to 3" from the bottom.
Jon

Save A Cow, Eat A Vegan....Totally Organic And Hormone Free!!

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1634 on: July 14, 2012, 02:59:42 PM »
Stainless steel 3" 3/8" dm bolts with SS nuts and lock washers ... FTW. 

Screws? Wha?  Don't use screws.



 

self drilling self tapping stainless tek screws would work, but you won't find those in most hardware stores.
-Jeff

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1635 on: July 14, 2012, 05:40:17 PM »
Looks damn fine, FVG, very elite NY style..!

Offline FVG

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1636 on: July 15, 2012, 11:35:23 AM »
Thanks - the goal of this cooking was to keep temperatures down as apposed to trying to get them high like in previous attempts and go for a NY style of pie cooked outside.

The addition of the wood really helped in keeping top and bottom temperatures balanced.

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1637 on: July 15, 2012, 11:43:03 AM »
FVG:  very nice.  VERY VERY nice.  I've been advocating this setup for a while now, and I'm tickled to see someone give it a try.  I don't have the money for the KPI, or I'd definitely being doing it as well.    I've been approximating this setup without the KPI, and it works pretty well.  Like you said, it's more a matter of keeping control of the temps, instead of just seeing how hot you can get it.

Very nice work!
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1638 on: July 16, 2012, 11:45:51 AM »
Aluminum will definitely melt in a deflector role, even heavy aluminum.

The Emile Henry stone is glazed cordierite.  I'm not too ecstatic about the glaze and the cordierite seems to be a little more conductive than usual, but I think it will work in an LBE.

Aluminum will melt over time if it is thin. I tried the popular aluminum pizza pan deflector technique in one of the ovens at the market. By the end of the 5 hour session, the pan was warping and had started to melt. For a less intensive cooking sessions, the aluminum can work, but I would not recommend thin aluminum if long sessions are what you want.

If you have not purchased the Emile Henry stone yet, I second Brian's thoughts on a kiln shelf. Look for a local clayworks shop/supplier. You can typically pick up a new, round kiln shelf for much less money than a store bought "fancier" pizza stone.
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1639 on: July 16, 2012, 12:48:38 PM »
What gauge steel is recommended for a diy kettle ring? Any thoughts on a preferred height? Stone type and thickness?  Thanks!
Do you think cutting the stone into 4 pieces and arranging them in the wave pattern would be beneficial?
« Last Edit: July 16, 2012, 12:53:14 PM by Chicago Bob »
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