Author Topic: Little Black Egg  (Read 404322 times)

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scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1650 on: July 16, 2012, 07:11:08 PM »
That really is the cheapest way to go.. as far as looks, not so great.  I also have a concern about dimensional stability.  Once the heat gets up there, you could be seeing a lot of movement with this approach.  Sagging, warping, twisting, all things you don't really want when you've got an 800+ stone + a dome balanced on top of your LBE.

Brian, a curved piece of de-galvanized steel or copper flashing will be very dimensionally stable, as long as it's not too lightweight of a gauge.  A thin sheet of metal, on it's edge, has considerable compressive strength.  I also have been talking about supporting the lid OR the stone, not both.  With the stone sitting on the flashing, you really don't need the lid. 

You can also take twice the length of flashing that you need,  fold it in half and have two concentric rings.  This would be especially good for copper because it would give you a sandwich of air to act as insulation.

Another idea that came to me is placing two strips of flashing together, folding over the last inch, then folding that inch in half again to make a union.  When you separate the two strips the union will be 8 layers of metal thick, and, when on it's side, give you even greater compressive strength. You could, in theory, place these unions every few inches along the C.

When you buy the flashing, you won't be able to get a strip that's (2/3 to 3/4 the circumference of a 22.5" circle) by 4 or 5" (the approximate height you'll need), so the excess flashing can be used to double the ring or other kinds of fortification.


Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1651 on: July 16, 2012, 09:36:17 PM »
Scott, I really need to get those bolts you are talking about because the grill on mine is sagging.  I only did one bake session of three pies and noticed it sagging but I did not look at it seriously close until today and it's really sagging bad.  I would not do another bake until I get the bolts and install them to support the kiln shelving.  Thanks for suggesting the bolts.

Ronbro or Villaroma, thanks for starting this thread.  Without you posting about the LBE I would have no idea about these things.  I have some tweaking to do but I'm on the right path. Thanks bud.


Offline shuboyje

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1652 on: July 16, 2012, 11:01:07 PM »
Scott,

I just came up with the perfect way to do this.  Black stove pipe.  You can buy it at any hardware store in at least 6" diameter, possibly 8".  This pipe is safe for high heat with no treatment needed.  It will have a seam running it's entire length that is composed of a male end and a female end that simple snap into place.  Say you want your ring 6" tall.  Simply use tin snips to cut a series of 6 inch bands out of it.  Then use the seams to connect them together to get the desired length to make a larger radius.  I would personally make a complete ring with a door cut into it for extra stability, but that's just me.
-Jeff

scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1653 on: July 20, 2012, 08:12:52 PM »
Jeff, I like.  Cheap, sturdy and no zinc.

Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1654 on: July 22, 2012, 04:35:20 PM »
Stainless steel 3" 3/8" dm bolts with SS nuts and lock washers ... FTW. 

Screws? Wha?  Don't use screws.



 

Scott and Pizaneer,

I got some bolts at Home Depot and just installed them.  I made sure they were level and seems so far so good but I did not bake a pie as of yet. I am probably gonna tonight and I'll let you guys know how the bolts held up (literally and figuratively).  Thanks guys.

scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1655 on: July 22, 2012, 05:05:25 PM »
James, sounds great.  Did you go with a stainless bolt?  If you didn't, that means they're galvanized, which means zinc.

Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1656 on: July 22, 2012, 05:39:01 PM »
Scott,

I got the kind that is not coated, I suppose stainless steel. I was having a hard time finding what I needed and I asked the Home Depot worker and he was really helpful. I told him what I needed it for and he made sure I got the ones not coated because he said he didn't think I should have any coating that could cause harmful chemicals to be on my food.

I know you told me not to get coated also but when I asked him for help he made sure not to get me coated bolts.

Thanks.

scott123

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1657 on: July 22, 2012, 06:22:06 PM »
Excellent, James, I'm looking forward to hearing about your further exploits.

Offline simcha

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1658 on: July 22, 2012, 06:58:35 PM »
Hi everyone, I'm back again with a little more experience than when I first started.  The good news, I've figured out how to properly flour the peel and work area.  The seemingly unfavorable news is that I'm using semolina flour on the peel and after I cook the first two pies, pie number 3 came out burnt on the bottom.  Now there is excess  burnt semolina on the bricks, can this be causing the burning? 

I'll be honest I don't check the temps after launching the first pie so the bricks may be getting much hotter and burning the bottoms.

Also does anyone have a method of removing burnt semolina from the hot stones?

Thanks again for the help, I feel I made a great jump today by making 2 completely edible pies.


Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1659 on: July 23, 2012, 12:18:27 AM »
Well, I made a pie with the setup of having the bolts support the kiln shelving.  Guess what it was an epic failure but not because of the bolts. 

What happened is the lid or dome whatever you wanna call it is on a hinge and you can lift it with the handle and it will open up.  The bolts are in the way of the hinge and I did not notice until after I was heating it up and noticed it was not getting nearly as hot as it did the first time I used it.  The bolts prevent the lid from completely closing so there is a pretty noticeable gap between the lid and the bottom half of the unit. Too much hot air is escaping.

Not a problem though, I am gonna remove the hinges and just lift the lid/dome off instead of raise it as it is now with the hinges. I need those bolts because the grate sags with the stones on it so eventually maybe the grate will break because the heat and the weight of the kiln. 

So tomorrow I take the hinges off and then do another bake. The first bake I did the other day was fine.  I think this Little Red Corvette works really well but I need the hinges off and hope everything is back to normal.

I'll let you guys know how it goes after it's done.


Thanks

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1660 on: July 23, 2012, 01:12:45 PM »
Well, I made a pie with the setup of having the bolts support the kiln shelving.  Guess what it was an epic failure but not because of the bolts.  

What happened is the lid or dome whatever you wanna call it is on a hinge and you can lift it with the handle and it will open up.  The bolts are in the way of the hinge and I did not notice until after I was heating it up and noticed it was not getting nearly as hot as it did the first time I used it.  The bolts prevent the lid from completely closing so there is a pretty noticeable gap between the lid and the bottom half of the unit. Too much hot air is escaping.

Not a problem though, I am gonna remove the hinges and just lift the lid/dome off instead of raise it as it is now with the hinges. I need those bolts because the grate sags with the stones on it so eventually maybe the grate will break because the heat and the weight of the kiln.  

So tomorrow I take the hinges off and then do another bake. The first bake I did the other day was fine.  I think this Little Red Corvette works really well but I need the hinges off and hope everything is back to normal.

I'll let you guys know how it goes after it's done.


Thanks

James, what a lot of us with 18.5" Webers do is to us the charcoal grate made for the 22" model. Charcoal grates are made of steel, and hold up to the heat fairly well. They still sag somewhat from the heat, but it seems to taper off and not continually sag or get so it's a PITA to use, such as with the regular cooking grates. You might try to find a steel "charcoal" grate for your LBE...

Also, not real cheap, but I know you have rectangular grill, you might consider a specialty cast iron or steel grate from the following:

http://www.cast-iron-grate.com

http://www.huntingdoncocustoms.com/bbqgrillgrates.html
« Last Edit: July 23, 2012, 01:20:13 PM by toddster63 »

Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1661 on: July 23, 2012, 01:56:58 PM »
todd, thanks for the info and links.  I checked out the links.  I have to look more carefully and see what they have for mine.

I actually got my lid to close. I tried to pry the hinges off with a screwdriver but the rivets were just to strong for me to pry them off.  I was able to pry the legs off the grill when I was making this thing and they were riveted on yet these hinges were just riveted too strong.  So what I did was I have a jigsaw and was able to cut the hinges off so now the lid closes.  There are two hinges, one set of major hinges and two smaller ones. I just had to cut the major or big hinges off and the small are still there so I can still raise the lid with the smaller hinges.

So it was an epic success, well not quite but almost. The only thing that prevented it from being an epic success was that the bottom of the pie was a little to charred.  Not so bad where I could not eat it but just a bit.  Was my fault because I let it get too hot, I mean the kiln. The thing heats up really fast and when it was about 450 F I went inside and did some stuff then I came back out and it was about 730 F so I lowered the regulator a bit but was impatient and put the pizza on.  I know that the temp of the hearth drops some but from 730 F does not drop that much.  So I need to watch it and make sure about 630 or so drop it.

By the way, the first time I used this thing last week I got that spider webbing effect in the rim that I so like.  This time I did not because I did not stretch it the way I'd get a rim.  But maybe combination of rim, Power Flour, and high heat and maybe no oil gave me the spider web effect.  Very cool.

Using this Little Red Corvette really is more efficient than using my home oven. I like this thing.  I have to dial it in where I can make it consistently good.  Might have mentioned it before but will again.  Mine isn't egg shape so it can't be a Little Red Egg so I just call it a Little Red Corvette (LRC) even though it's not really Corvette shape nor is it all red but there is a Prince song from 1982 called Little Red Corvette so I thought I'd call it that.

I misplaced my digi camera so I can not take pics but wish I did so I could have posted the pics.

So for now I'm good but I am gonna look into these grates you talk about.

Thanks much

buceriasdon

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1662 on: July 23, 2012, 04:23:02 PM »
I would go a more DIY approach to the support grill sagging. The home improvement stores carry a cut metal dept. where you can get some 3/8" steel rod. Layout and drill some parallel holes on two opposing sides of the bottom, don't need many, but enough to support your hearth stone. Cut the rods to length, slip in from side to side and set the tile/stone on it and your done.
Don

Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1663 on: July 23, 2012, 04:50:14 PM »
I would go a more DIY approach to the support grill sagging. The home improvement stores carry a cut metal dept. where you can get some 3/8" steel rod. Layout and drill some parallel holes on two opposing sides of the bottom, don't need many, but enough to support your hearth stone. Cut the rods to length, slip in from side to side and set the tile/stone on it and your done.
Don

I like your idea. I have those hole already because I have bolts sticking out of them and the bolts are strong enough to support my stones but I think that steel rods going across the entire length of the stones would be more supportive.  I'll see if Home Depot has cut metal department to cut these for me.  Thanks buceriasdon.

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1664 on: July 23, 2012, 04:53:28 PM »
Yeah, that's a great idea, Don.

buceriasdon

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1665 on: July 23, 2012, 04:59:32 PM »
3/8" might be excessive except if the burner is right below the cross rods but I'd rather over engineer than under.
Don

Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1666 on: July 30, 2012, 07:46:22 PM »
When you guys turn on the burner are you turning it on at a low setting then gradually increasing the gas over time or do you start off on high?  Thanks.


Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1667 on: July 30, 2012, 08:23:00 PM »
Personally, I turn it on med-low until the stone gets to temp, reduce it to low while I skin and dress, then launch & turn it up.   I'm shooting for 20% higher top temp than stone temp.

That does depend on whether it's the first pie, etc.  I try to give the stone a little cool-off time between bakes, as nobody in my family likes char but me.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1668 on: July 30, 2012, 10:06:45 PM »
When you guys turn on the burner are you turning it on at a low setting then gradually increasing the gas over time or do you start off on high?  Thanks.

That all depends on what is going on, and how much time I have. I prefer to start at medium and let the stone take about 20 minutes to get up to 600-650Fish.  But sometimes when running late, I turn it up much higher (maybe 2/3-3/4) and get the stone to temp in closer to 10 minutes... But again, I prefer it a little lower and longer—it seems to make a more stable stone temp. Though the IR gun says 625F in both cases, when using quicker heat up times I get more sporadic under skirt results—naked spots, too much char on spots...

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1669 on: August 13, 2012, 12:22:34 PM »
While the LBE can be tempermental, requires a good amount of tinkering and is not ideal, they are still one of the best deals around for having a compact, easily transportable oven that can produce a nice pizza.

I still have not gotten the excellent top heat and bakes that Chau or Toddster63 have been able to acheive with their LBEs, but I wanted to give thanks to Villa Roma for starting this road and laying down the inspiration we have all followed. Thanks!  :)

Some recent efforts:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14521.msg200182.html#msg200182

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14521.msg201698.html#msg201698

"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1670 on: August 13, 2012, 03:52:40 PM »
Looks mighty fine and tasty to moi, K, very nice indeed...! Really dig the yellow cherry tomat's...!

Offline lennyk

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1671 on: August 16, 2012, 12:15:40 PM »
what is the typical size pie made in an LBE ?

Offline WaterDog

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1672 on: August 16, 2012, 01:25:25 PM »
what is the typical size pie made in an LBE ?

With my 16" stone, pies are 12-13".


Offline toddster63

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1673 on: August 16, 2012, 07:57:50 PM »
Biggest pie in my 18.5" LBE on a 16" stone is 14"...

Offline simcha

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Re: Little Black Egg
« Reply #1674 on: August 19, 2012, 06:05:37 PM »
Hi everyone, I need some help.  Currently my wife has shut down my LBE because I keep burning pies  :chef:.  What I'm finding is that I can't get my LBE to temps below 600 degrees.  I have the 20psi regulator and it's really powerful.  

Pies that have to bake at 500 quickly become charcoal in my inferno LBE.

Can anyone offer some ideas of how I can decrease the temps?  Also I'm running my LBE at the lowest possible setting on the regulator valve.

Thanks for the help!
« Last Edit: August 19, 2012, 06:10:07 PM by simcha »


 

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