Author Topic: Moister Crust????  (Read 1292 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline dapizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 38
  • Location: Kansas
  • Show me the Pizza!
Moister Crust????
« on: April 21, 2007, 03:05:25 PM »
Okay, I want to achieve a moister crust, along with a crispy outside (american style).  (Really the moistness is what I am looking for.)  Where should I start when tinkering with recipes?  Is it the oil, the water, or what that should be increased or decreased?  Thanks.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2007, 03:08:28 PM by dapizza »


Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1877
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: Moister Crust????
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2007, 04:02:07 PM »
dapizza,

Both oil and sugar will help maintain moisture.  The oil is better at helping the dough retain moisture before baking, and the sugar is better at helping the dough retain moisture during baking, but they both share roles in both cases.  What's difficult about increasing moisture by some arbitrary amount is that the crust will not be "baked" until a certain lower level of moisture remains, or something with better thermal conductivity than water (e.g. sugar, oil) supplements the baking process.  This is why deep frying a food in oil turns out a browned product, versus boiling a food in water.  The Maillard reaction and caramelization that's responsible for browning only happens at specific temperatures, and as long as a lot of water remains in the dough, those reactions won't happen.

For you're own personal tastes, you will have to test doughs with higher oil, sugar, or oil and sugar to see what results you like best.

- red.november

EDIT: Since you mentioned also wanting a crispy outside, it's almost a no-brainer.  What you want to do is oil your dough and pan before going in the oven.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2007, 04:05:42 PM by November »

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21901
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Moister Crust????
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2007, 04:07:00 PM »
dapizza,

I would go with a slightly underkneaded, fairly high hydration dough (above 60%), use a fair amount of oil (above 4-5%), proof the shaped and stretched-out skin for about an hour before dressing, and bake the pizza at a lower than usual temperature for a longer than usual time, or start with a high temperature (to help the oven spring) and lower it after the dressed pizza goes into the oven. I don't personally use sugar all that often, but sugar also contributes to a more tender crust, and it should withstand the lower oven temperature without causing overbrowning of the crust. It's up to you if you want to cold ferment or not, but in either case you should use the proper amount of yeast and water temperature for each scenario.

You may have to play around with the values, including skin thickness and pizza size, so please tell us what works for you.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21901
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Moister Crust????
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2007, 04:11:41 PM »
My post registered shortly after November's edit. I assumed that a stone was to be used, but if a pan is to be used, I agree with what November says.

Peter


 

pizzapan