Author Topic: What Pans are Recommended?  (Read 6210 times)

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Offline doughdiver

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What Pans are Recommended?
« on: November 05, 2007, 02:06:01 PM »
Hello,

I would like to get started making Chicago Style pizzas.  I did a search, but I am still confused.  A couple of questions.

What is the best pan size to get?  I have seen references for 10" pans and 14.5" pans.

What should the pan be made of?  I have seen hard anondized aluminum, professional with RESIST non tick coatings, aluminum etc.

Do I need to season the pan and if so how do I do it?

Is there a good mail order source for deep dish pans?

Does a grill work for making deep dish pizza's?

I am sure that these questions have been asked many times.  If these have been addressed elsewhere, a link would be helpful.

Thank you.

Dough Diver
Rick


Offline canadianbacon

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2007, 02:40:31 PM »
Hi there Dough Diver,

Since nobody has answered yet, here is some info to get you started.

Do a search for " PSTK " , you can see more info on this special coating that PizzaTools puts on their pizza pans.
There is a good thread I remember, where somebody was talking about this coating.


see here for info on these pans:
http://www.pizzatools.com/productdisplay.aspx?catid=53&c=Deep_Dish_Nesting_Heavy#

This website has 2 different types of pizza pans available, deep dish nesting pans,
and deep dish "stacking" pans.  Look carefully at what you want, some of the pans stack, some don't,
and there are special lids available for one of the types of pans.

Now to add to that, you then have the choice between this special coating they apply to the pans,
which is called "PSTK" .  I have often looked at these pans but they are too expensive, they are basically
double the price.  There are many guys here that say the special coating
gives amazing results.

Pizzamaker, Rib Smoker, HomeBrewer, there's not enough time for a real job.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2007, 05:26:54 PM »
Dough Diver,

There are many types and sizes of deep-dish pans. Which you decide to select will to a large degree depend on how you plan to use the pans, how often, and your pocketbook.

I have several of the PSTK products from pizzatools.com (http://www.pizzatools.com/) and they are my favorites because the dark, anodized finish is a baked-in finish that doesn’t chip, scratch or peel. And the pans do not require seasoning before using. Canadianbacon (Mark) is right that the PSTK products are expensive, but if you plan on using them often and over a long period of time, say, several years, the initial upfront investment is worth it in my opinion. pizzatools.com sells mostly to the pizza trade but they will also sell direct to individuals. All of their products are made in the U.S., so their prices will reflect that.

Although I haven’t tried them, both American Metalcraft and Chicago Metallic also carry deep-dish pans. Both sell mainly through restaurant supply companies, many of which are online and can be found through simple Google searches. For the pans carried by American Metalcraft, you should look at those under the Series 5000, 8000 and 9000 designations, at http://www.amnow.com/Pizza-Trays/5000-Series-Pans,
http://www.amnow.com/Pizza-Trays/8000-Series-Pans and http://www.amnow.com/Pizza-Trays/9000-Series-Pans. Go to the bottom of the pages to see the dark pans. You will usually be able to buy the AM products at about 15-20% lower than the prices noted at the AM website.

You can see an example of the Chicago Metallic deep-dish pans with the Bakalon anodized finish at http://www.abestkitchen.com/store/product221.html. At one time, Chicago Metallic sold pans with nonstick coatings under the Bakalon brand (and they may still do), so you may want to keep that in mind so that you don’t confuse the two types of pans.

Not long ago, one of our members asked me about steel deep-dish pans coated with tin. These pans are generally less expensive than the anodized pans discussed above, but they require seasoning before use. Often there is an initial seasoning followed by actual use that contributes additional seasoning over a long period of time. Most home pizza makers are unlikely to make enough pizzas to get that seasoning so that is something to keep in mind. If this type of pan is of interest to you, you can get additional details at the first two posts at this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5498.msg46502.html#msg46502.

There are also pans with traditional nonstick coatings that are frequently used for baking cakes but can also be used to bake deep-dish pizzas. Some of them are springform pans, which can be a big help in releasing the deep-dish pizzas from the pans. I have a few pans with the nonstick coatings, including a springform version, but I try not to use them at very high oven temperatures that might cause the coatings to break down and possibly emit noxious fumes. Most deep-dish pies are baked below 500 degrees F, so I think they are OK for using them to make deep-dish pies. I would look for pans that have coatings that are the most recent technologically since they are most likely to be the best coatings with the best features. You can find the nonstick pans just about everywhere, both online and at traditional stores that sell kitchenware products.

I personally try to avoid the shiny aluminum deep-dish pans. They reflect heat rather than absorb it (you can end up with light-colored crusts), and they require seasoning, both initial seasoning and seasoning that comes from prolonged use. Their only advantage that I can see is that they are the cheapest pans.

The size of the pan you select is mainly a personal decision based on how much deep-dish you need or can handle. If the deep-dish pizzas are only for you, you will not want to get a 16” pan. Maybe a 10” pan would be better. If you plan to feed a crowd, maybe the 16” pan will be suitable for your purposes. I would say that 12” and 14” pans are perhaps the most popular among the members. Pans with depths of 1.5-2" are also quite common. Some like the straight-sided pans, while other prefer the sloping-sided pans, maybe because of greater ease of removal of the pies from the pans, or for easier stacking.

I don’t have an answer for you about using a grill to make the deep-dish style. Maybe one of our members who has used a grill for that purpose will be able to provide an answer.

I think that that pretty much covers the deep-dish pan landscape. Good luck.

Peter
« Last Edit: December 30, 2010, 08:15:58 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline loowaters

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2007, 06:03:22 PM »
I love my American Metalcraft Hard Coat Anodized pans.  I have a 10", 12", and a 14" with the 14" getting the most use.  As Pete mentioned, you can pick these up at restaurant supply houses at a pretty good price and usually you won't have to pay shipping that way, they just tack your pan on to their usual order.  Mine is 2" straight side 8000 series.  Here's a pick of mine about to go into action http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4070.msg34824.html#msg34824

Also, as Pete said, stay away from the shiny pans.  Shiny = poor results.

Good luck!
Using pizza to expand my waistline since 1969!

Offline canadianbacon

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2007, 06:03:58 PM »
Hi Peter,

Wow, some really good info there you posted.  Thanks for taking the time to do so,
and I appreciate it, even though I'm not the original poster.

One thing that I remember reading on the pizzatools.com website is that the 14" pizza trays
may be the largest that may fit in a regular sized oven.

I remember at one time measuring from the back of my oven to the front, and I couldn't believe just how
large 14" actually was ! - wow.  I don't think anything larger than that will fit in my oven, so if anyone is
thinking of ordering pans, just make sure you measure beforehand.

Mark
Pizzamaker, Rib Smoker, HomeBrewer, there's not enough time for a real job.

Offline Za guy

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2008, 03:05:37 PM »
I wish I had thought through the pan issue a bit more before I started looking for pans.  This thread would have been a great place to start.  By now I have placed my 3rd order for pans. 

I first bought two of the dark (non-stick) Chicago Metallic 14" x 1 1/2" deep pans at Amazon.com.  These are very nice pans, but I suppose I'd only need two such big pans if I had a party and almost everyone liked one of the two combinations of toppings.  I suppose I could make four half-pizza combos with the two pans, so I'll probably do that some day.

Then I tried finding some 10" pans I could use instead.  All I could find readily available online were the 9" x 2" deep American Metalcraft Anodized pans.  They are nesting but have a pretty good slope to their sides, so the bottom diameter is really only 8".  These seem too small,, and maybe better better suited for individual pizzas for big eaters or maybe to share among two kids.  I bought four of these, so maybe I could use these to freeze some extra pies after I cook them.  I froze some leftover pie last time and it was pretty decent a week or so later.  I guess freezing unbaked pies woudn't work so well though from what I've read in here somewhere.

So now after reading this thread, I am awaiting two of the PSTK 10" x 2" deep stacking pans that I ordered from Pizzatools.  I think I will like the straight sides as that's what I remember from the restaurants in Chicago.  Can't wait til they get here.  I'm gonna bake one spinach pie for wifey and me, and a combo with 1/2 sausage and 1/2 pepperoni for the kids.  With all these pans now, I should be ready for anything.  I just hope my next pizza comes out better than the last two!     

Za guy

Offline Randy

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2008, 03:33:15 PM »
Vertical sided pans can be a problem to depan until you get the knack of tossing and plopping.  The spring-form pan is hard to beat in depanning and the second best is a deep dish pans that the sides slope.  I use the 10" spring pan for the two of us and use the 14" sloping pan for guest.  Non of mine or authenic so listen to the other guys for having the right pan.

Offline Za guy

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2008, 04:57:47 PM »
I thought about that, and you're right - the slope-sided pans sure seem to help there.  My 1st deep dish pie was a 14" with slope-sides, and I was able to get it out w/o wrecking it, so I was happy.  But I saw the Giordano's video here on this site, and I will watch it ten more times before I try to flop my pies out.  It definitely showed the proper technique.  I even bought one of those cast aluminum pan grippers just so I can try to toss it upwards while I slide the spatula underneath.  Wish me luck!

Za guy

Offline Randy

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2008, 06:54:20 PM »
Ya got it.  I'm no expert at the depanning but even if you do a dump it will make for a great story and a good laugh.

Randy

Offline TZekos

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2009, 10:04:13 PM »
These Deep dish pans/stones work great.

amazon.com/Sassafras-Deep-Dish-Pizza-Baker

Enjoy!

Pizza, the perfect food!


Offline loowaters

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Re: What Pans are Recommended?
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2009, 10:15:39 PM »
With all respect to the results you may have had, TZekos, with the stone pan, it is far inferior to a metal pan.  It just doesn't come up to temp quickly enough in the oven like a dark colored pan will.  Many of us give a flat stone up to an hour in the oven at full blast to get that to temp for thin crust or NY style pies.  Having tried one of these ages ago, it just didn't get the bottom as crisp as I want it.

Loo
Using pizza to expand my waistline since 1969!


 

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