Author Topic: Donatos Pizza Recipe  (Read 41071 times)

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Offline laider

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #25 on: February 27, 2008, 11:31:37 PM »
here's a poor quality pic


Offline KettleKooked

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #26 on: February 29, 2008, 10:16:31 PM »
Wazatron,
I have been leaching off this site as a pizza making newbie for a while and you have moved me to make my first post.  I do not have a Donatos in my county.  I drive a lot in my job, and I knew the location of every store in Ohio.  My lunch times were scheduled around potential Donatos locations.  There is no pizza like Donato's pizza.  My whole family is nuts about the stuff, and my oldest son will take a date for a 40 mile drive to get Donatos pizza if she says she has never had it.

When McDonalds purchased them a while back, there was a marked difference in quality, but I understand the Grote family has repurchased the chain and the pizza is better again.  I have tried and tried to replicate this one of kind crust and cannot wait to try your recipe.  Your pics and pizza look great. 
I went to school in Ft. Collins but couldn't have lived there for the lack of Donatos.  Perhaps you have freed me to move to the mountains. LOL

I'll have to look for some of the ingredients, but will post my results as soon as I can get the stuff together.  I hope it's as good as it looks.

Offline BTB

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #27 on: March 03, 2008, 09:07:11 PM »
Several weeks ago after receiving the dairy whey and baker's non-fat dry milk from Bob's Red Mill, I proceeded to put together a Donatos Clone pizza somewhat along the lines mentioned in this thread.  I made a 14" pizza using my trusty old dark, anodized non-perforated cutter pan from pizzatools.com and using Harvest King flour.  The formulation using the expanded dough calculation tool was as follows:

Flour (100%):  270.56 g  |  9.54 oz | 0.6 lbs
Water (46%):  124.46 g  |  4.39 oz | 0.27 lbs
ADY (.65%):  1.76 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.47 tsp | 0.16 tbsp
Salt (1.5%):  4.06 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.73 tsp | 0.24 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (3.5%):  9.47 g | 0.33 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.09 tsp | 0.7 tbsp
Sugar (1%):  2.71 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.68 tsp | 0.23 tbsp
Sweet Dried Dairy Whey (1.5%):  4.06 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.34 tsp | 0.45 tbsp
Baker's Non-Fat Dry Milk (1.7%):  4.6 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.18 tsp | 0.39 tbsp
Eggs, large (10.8%):  29.22 g | 1.03 oz | 0.06 lbs | 5.77 tsp | 1.92 tbsp
Total (166.65%): 450.89 g | 15.9 oz | 0.99 lbs | TF = 0.09

I put a 15" size in the calculation tool for a 14" pizza so I didn't need to provide for any bowl residue.  I mixed the dough with a wooden spoon as well as by hand, let it rise on the counter for a few hours, then placed the dough ball in a ziplock bag and into the refrigerator for around 26 hours.  Afterwards, I took it out and let it get to room temperature for about 2 hours, then rolled it out on a floured counter.  The dough was very sticky and I had to throw some more flour on it to roll it onto the rolling pin and attempted to thereafter rolled it out onto the lightly greased cutter pan.  The dough stucked together so badly that I had to take it off of the rolling pin and re-roll the dough back out to an approximate 14" size to fit into the cutter pan.  I just then picked the rolled up dough and placed it onto the cutter pan (first picture below) fitting it into the pan as best I could, then docked it and pre-baked it for about 4 minutes (second picture below) at 450 degrees F (bottom rack)  I wasn't certain if the pre-baking of the skin was part of Wazatron's process, though. 

Offline BTB

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #28 on: March 03, 2008, 09:09:03 PM »
After par-baking, I let it rest for about 15 minutes then put some doctored-up 6 in 1 sauce onto the skin (picture below), then dressed it with sausage and cheese (second picture below) and it was ready for the oven.

Offline BTB

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #29 on: March 03, 2008, 09:16:18 PM »
I baked the pizza on the bottom rack at 450 degrees F for 15 minutes (turning the pizza 180 degrees midway through that time).  The first picture below shows the baked pizza in the cutter pan and the second pizza shows the pizza cut up ready for devouring.  This was my first attempt at this style pizza as I was curious as to how it would taste. 

There were some pluses and minuses:  The minuses were (1) the difficulty in rolling out and getting the skin into (or onto) the cutter pan (dough was very sticky), and (2) difficulty in getting the pizza to crisp up.  I probably should have used more flour when I first mixed the dough ball.  I sensed it was sticky, so next time I will add more flour.  But getting it crispy in the way that I generally like my thin crust pizzas seems to be a challenge.  I had checked the bottom of the skin before taking it out, but for fear of burning the toppings, I took the pizza out after 15 minutes.  I've used this cutter pan many times before to make crispy thin crust pizzas and this was the first time that I could not get a thin crust pizza to crisp up.  By crispy I don't mean a cracker crust.  The baked dough was relatively soft throughout.  Is it the dairy whey and/or the baker's non-fat dry milk?  I don't know.  Maybe I should have par-bake the skin even longer.  Again, I wasn't sure if Wazatron par-baked the skin at all. 

The major plus on the other hand was . . . despite the lack of crispness that I like, the pizza was very tasty.  I enjoyed the taste and texture of it very much and even enjoyed several leftover pieces just as well a couple days later.  I'll just have to play around with some of the variables the next time I try out this style, but I think others may find this pizza interesting as well as delicious.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #30 on: March 03, 2008, 10:22:49 PM »
BTB,

My recollection is that Wazatron has been using a perforated anodized disk that is oiled. Also, the rolled out skin is allowed to proof in a humidified environment. There is no pre-baking of the skin. Cornmeal is also used on the skin.

It will be more of a challenge to get a high degree of crispiness with the Donatos type of crust, although the bottom of the crust should be crispy and the edges should be very crispy. The use of the dried dairy whey and the baker's dried milk powder, along with the egg, will produce a degree of softness and tenderness in the finished crust that will work against getting a high degree of crispiness throughout the entire crust. Also, because the egg includes about 76% water, the actual hydration of the dough is closer to 54% when the water content of the egg is added to the formula water. Moreover, the fat included in the egg will increase the total fat in the dough formulation to around 4.6%. Under these circumstances, some experimentation may be required to use a standard nonperforated cutter pan with the Donatos clone dough formulation.

Another point to keep in mind is that Wazatron is in Colorado, at a fairly high elevation. It's possible that some modification may be needed to use the dough formulation at lower elevation.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 09:14:29 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Wazatron

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #31 on: March 04, 2008, 09:05:07 AM »
Hey there BTB - very cool to see your pictures! I'm glad you enjoyed it, and you ran into some of the biggest challenges too.

Pete is right I don't par-bake the crust at all. It it gets rolled out, hydrated for 30 minutes, and then left out on the counter to rest/dry for an hour or so before I bake it.

Also the dough can easily get very, very stick - I've gotten very careful about getting it too wet when mixing it up, and even cut down the water a bit in the last recipe. It's easy to add tiny amounts of water to get the tough to come together than add flour and mess more with the recipe. When you do get the tough together so that it's not too sticky it's not bad to work with. I still do use a lot of bench flour to roll it out but never have any problems in working with it or getting it on to the disc. I'd definitely try cutting the water back a bit and then just adding small amounts to bring it together. But in general, no, the dough shouldn't be as sticky and hard to work with as you describe.

And then browning is tough as well. I know for a fact that Donatos uses conveyor ovens and that it cooks for about 7 minutes. The edges get really brown and crisp too, which has been hard for me to get consistently. Another reason for the short time is so that the cheese and toppings don't overcook. One thing Pete suggested (which I haven't gotten to try yet) is to bake on the lowest rack for 7 minutes and then put it under the broiler for a minute or two to help browning. Another thing I'm going to play around with is putting in my pizza stone on a shelf just above the pizza (after pre-heating it for a good hour) to see how that might help the top browning.

So yeah, in general, the crust is supposed to have different textures  - the bottom should be brown and crisp there should be an english-muffin type middle layer (though still thin) and the top should be moist and spongy. This has been a tough pizza to nail but more people are trying it out now which is helping and is fun to see how they come out!
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 11:46:30 AM by Wazatron »

Offline kvedderman

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #32 on: April 07, 2010, 02:55:23 PM »
I found a take and bake donato's pizza last night at fry's supermarket(owned by Kroger)..With this purchase I have found that the shake is Ramona cheese( using sheeps milk),Oregano, and powered cellulose(anti caking agent)..
The ingredients of the pizza dough appear in different order than the one you guys received...Eggs are down the list..

enriched bleach flour(wheat)
water
yeast
whole egg
soy oil
maltodextrin
non fat dry milk
salt
sugar
modified food starch
sodium metabisulfite
coated with corn meal, soy oil, butter...

The crust was a bit different (not much)...
directions were 460 for 10-14 minutes...10 minutes and things were darkening quickly...

Tried measuring the crust, looked like 5/16" prebaked..Total weight of everything was 26.24 oz
Served with one of mine and our guest liked mine better..I liked the donato's more...
From Columbus Ohio and going back for Mothers Day..Donato"s is in my future...

Offline Link

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #33 on: April 08, 2010, 10:34:06 AM »
I live in Mout Vernon, Ohio, my wife and I eat at Donoto's frequently. I tried the Donato's the take and bake from Krogers, its not nearly as good as the real thing. I dont know if the ingedients are different, or my oven just doesnt bake it properly, but the real thing is much, much better, IMHO.

Link
« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 10:37:01 AM by Link »


Offline cul8rv8

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #34 on: April 13, 2010, 06:52:50 PM »
Hi all, new to the site, originally from central Ohio, been living in Vegas for 6 years.  I always have to hit Donato's (along with White Castle, Skyline, Steak & Shake) when I make it back to visit, but I was wanting to try and make Donato's at home, so I came across this site and this thread.

I have a quick question, though.  In the original post, the clone sauce calls for Basil.  Is this dried basil, or fresh basil?  I have fresh basil in my herb garden, so I usually prefer to use that, but I also have dried basil in the cupboard for recipes that call for dried.  In this case, I am looking to try and be as close to the real deal as possible.
~ Jeff S.

Offline LadyGreen

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #35 on: July 20, 2011, 06:00:04 PM »
Hello! I've been learning from these threads about Donatos for a while now. Just last week finally gave it a try! I grew up in OH, and now live in KS. I miss Donatos! Haven't had it for probably 10 years!

My first try was pretty good! The crust wasn't quite right. I tripled the recipe because I was using two larger pans (16 inch?) I made the two pizzas, as well as a smaller cheese pizza for 'bread sticks'. It seemed too thick, and didn't seem as oily/golden as the picture I see on here. I'll be trying again soon! I have a lot of relatives waiting on me to get it down, so I can pass it on!

I also took some time to sit down and make the recipe 'user friendly' to me. Meaning- translated into common kitchen measurements. :) It's probably not exact as yours, but pretty close. I'm a very experienced bread maker. It's something I enjoy and excel at (even without a professional scale)  :)

Offline Shel659

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #36 on: July 06, 2014, 09:17:49 PM »

I LOVE DONATOS!!  I Just posted about it in the I'm new forum.  I'm born and raised in Columbus OH, so of course I have Donatos once a month?

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #37 on: July 15, 2014, 11:21:41 PM »
To whoever has commented on this thread and still wants to know more about how to clone Donatos:

After attempting several Donatos clones a couple months ago, I have come very close. (Close enough that when I made one for someone who works at the YMCA, she said it smelled like Donatos as soon as I walked into her office; that is, before she saw it and before I said what it was.) My first try (a few years ago) was based largely on Wazatron's formula, I think, but also based on what I know from having worked at Donatos. The part of most formulas I've seen that's really off the mark is the hydration percentage. Donatos dough is much stiffer than the dough I've seen on these Donatos threads.

It's getting late, so I'm not gonna share anywhere near the amount of info I would like to share, but here's my most recent dough formula:

100% Superlative flour (bread flour)
37% Water
0.5% IDY
1.5% Salt
4% Oil
1.5% Nonfat dry milk
11% Egg
1% Sugar

The dough formula is an important part of getting it right, but dough management is even more important. Dough management also requires a lot more words, which I'm not going to type tonight. I probably won't reply again unless someone asks me to reply with the dough management stuff. (Not because I want to be a jerk, but because I may forget and this thread will likely be out of sight within a week or two.)
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline thezaman

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #38 on: July 15, 2014, 11:41:07 PM »
 ryan, i am a fan of your clone. please reply and include sauce updates if you have one.thanks, larry

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #39 on: July 16, 2014, 10:55:41 AM »
The first thing I want to say is that I haven't included sweet dried dairy whey in my dough yet. I haven't chosen not to use it; rather, I just don't know if that's an ingredient I can easily get. Also, I guess I forgot that I omitted two ingredients when I first tried to do Donatos style a few years ago (sweet dried dairy whey and nonfat dry milk); one of which I have since added to my Donatos clone dough. So I guess whenever I get my hands on some sweet dried dairy whey, I'll add about 1.5% of it and see what kind of difference that makes.

Also, neither my current dough formula nor my current dough management system is anywhere near written in stone. I expect to make lots of little tweaks if I ever make more pizzas of this style, but I think Wazatron left us with a very good foundation for Donatos clone dough. Excluding the fact that I haven't tried sweet dried dairy whey, I think the only thing I've really changed much from Wazatron's dough formula is the hydration percentage (which I decreased considerably, as I knew right away that Wazatron's hydration figure was significantly higher than the hydration of real Donatos dough).

I'm gonna try to put together some dough management info now. I probably will not post this information for many hours, though, as it'll take a while for me to draft and I'll also be out of the house for a while today.
Ryan
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Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #40 on: July 16, 2014, 02:56:48 PM »
Ryan,

You are correct that trying to divine the hydration of a dough is one of the most difficult parts of reverse engineering a given dough or pizza. Moreover, there is no easy way, if at all, to arrive at the hydration of a dough through study and analysis of any available nutrition information. One of the few times that works is where the product is a fresh or frozen dough ball. In that case, the nutrition information is specific to that dough ball in that form. There are also ways of conducting bake tests when you have an actual fresh or defrosted dough ball in hand. The bake tests involve a small sample of the dough in question that is baked and weighed after a certain period of time. This is something that Norma did with a defrosted Mellow Mushroom dough ball and also with a defrosted Pepe's frozen dough ball. Even then, the moisture content of the flour from which the dough ball is made has to be taken into account when trying to establish the hydration value of the dough ball. Typically, the moisture content of the flour starts at around 14% at the miller's facility but it can then go lower as the flour works its way through the distribution channels and warehouses and the like to the ultimate end user.

By contrast with the above examples, when a product has a lot of components, such as flour, sauce and cheese (the most basic pizza), there is a loss of water during baking in all three of these components but there is no easy way to determine the extent of those losses, either individually or in the aggregate. And those losses can be different for different types and styles of pizzas and different bake protocols. And any available nutrition information is unlikely to be of much help. That leads one to pick what appears to be a reasonable hydration value and go from there. In my case, I had never had a Donatos pizza so that was all I could do. I relied on Wazatron to say if we were in the ballpark.

In your case, you have the advantage of having worked for Donatos. But even the Donatos dough formulation has changed over time. For example, in the early days, Donatos used both fresh milk and fresh whole eggs to make their dough. Both of these ingredients contain a high percentage of water. So, the amount of water added to the dough had to take into account the amounts of the water in the eggs and milk. Then, Donatos stopped using real milk and went to non-fat dry milk. But it kept the whole eggs. Again, the amount of water added to the dough had to take into account the water content of the eggs. I have not seen the most recent Donatos ingredients list so I don't know if there have been any other major changes. But in the above examples, the "true" hydration will be greater than the formula hydration. Now, if one adds whey, that will have the effect of lowering the "true" hydration because it is a dry ingredient.

Peter

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #41 on: July 16, 2014, 07:49:02 PM »
When I first thought or said the existing formulas' hydration percentages were too high (a few years ago), that was based entirely on pictures of other people's clone dough. Other people's pictures are what led me to determine what hydration percentage to use for my first clone attempt. That is, I didn't try 45% hydration and then deem 45% to be too high. Rather, I could easily see that the clone doughs were considerably softer/wetter than actual Donatos dough, so I assumed 35%ish would be a good place to start, while not changing any of the other dough ingredients' percentages (excluding the two ingredients I did not have). Thankfully 35%ish hydration turned out just about perfect.

That was with very soft well water, though. The water where I live now is much harder, which has forced me to increase the hydration of pretty much all my dough by 2-3%. I'm sure in time I'll report that I've had to increase the hydration with every style of dough I make.

Other than the hydration percentage, I think Wazatron's formula is great, and I wish Wazatron was still around to test out what I've shared and critique the results. Having looked at some of the older Donatos clone formulas last night, I was very surprised by how true I've stayed to those formulas now that I've tried cloning Donatos a few more times, not afraid to make changes wherever I think changes should be made. (Didn't you actually come up with that formula, Peter?)

I haven't made much progress on the dough management post I started drafting this morning.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #42 on: July 17, 2014, 10:11:35 AM »
Other than the hydration percentage, I think Wazatron's formula is great, and I wish Wazatron was still around to test out what I've shared and critique the results. Having looked at some of the older Donatos clone formulas last night, I was very surprised by how true I've stayed to those formulas now that I've tried cloning Donatos a few more times, not afraid to make changes wherever I think changes should be made. (Didn't you actually come up with that formula, Peter?)
Ryan,

While I came up with the initial dough formulation for the Donatos clone, it was due to very useful information that Waz came up with that allowed me to do that. So, I view what we did as a nice collaboration. As we went back and forth as we gained more experience and learned more about how Donatos made their pizzas, we eventually came up with the dough formulation as given at Reply 151 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=2711.msg46707#msg46707. A few months later, Waz decided to start this thread to represent what he then deemed to be the best version of the Donatos clone. You will note that he tried to give me most of the credit but he was being too kind. I think we needed each other.

I had forgotten that you joined the Donatos clone effort toward the end of that project. I recall at one point Waz was having some problems with the dough being too wet at times, so that seems to lend credence to your work that suggested that a lower hydration value was needed. On that score, I would trust your opinion over mine.

Peter

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #43 on: July 17, 2014, 02:30:57 PM »
Here's a very thorough recap of how I've been doing Donatos clones most recently. If anything is confusing, please let me know so I can make it less confusing. I'd say this represents my best-yet formula and workflow, but I'm sure a lot can be done to improve on how I've been doing it. Whenever I specify a brand name ingredient, it's just a suggestion. However, whenever I specify a brand name ingredient, it's because that brand has given me the best results so far. Particularly the tomato paste I suggest.

My Current Donatos Clone Dough Formula (based largely on Wazatron's formula)
100% Superlative flour (bread flour)
37% HOT WATER (as hot as the tap goes)
0.5% IDY
1.5% Salt
4% Vegetable oil
1.5% Nonfat dry milk
11% Egg***
1% Sugar

***With egg, I usually give the percentage a little wiggle room, from about 8% to about 12%, since one egg usually weighs about the right amount to constitute something in the neighborhood of 8-12% of a dough batch based on 19.17 oz (543 g) of flour. If one egg weighs a little more or less than my target egg weight (at 11% egg), I simply adjust the egg percentage a little on my spreadsheet before I make the dough. If I have to decrease the egg percentage by, say, 2% percent (because my egg weighs 49 g, rather than 59.8 g), I adjust the hydration percentage inversely to the change in egg percentage. So if you have to decrease the egg from 11% to 9%, increase the hydration from 37% to 39%.

Here's a less confusing way of saying what I said in the previous paragraph: Just make sure the hydration and egg percentages add up to 48%.

If you have soft water, you may need to decrease the hydration 2-3%

Recipe for 30 oz of dough
19.17 oz - Flour - 543 g
7.09 oz - HOT WATER - 201 g
0.86 tsp - IDY - 2.7 g
1.67 tsp - Salt - 8.2 g
0.77 oz - Oil - 22 g
0.29 oz - Nonfat dry milk - 8.2 g
2.11 oz - Egg - 59.8 g
1.57 tsp - Sugar - 5.4 g

Sauce
12 oz KROGER tomato paste ("Italian style" or something like that)
22-24 oz Water
1/2 tsp Dry basil
1/2 tsp Salt
1 tsp Sugar

To make dough:
  • Measure all dough ingredients.
  • Combine dry ingredients in mixer bowl.
  • Add wet ingredients to the mixer bowl.
  • If you have a KA mixer with a spiral dough hook, mix for 7 minutes on speed 2. (If you don't have a spiral dough hook, mix until the dough has picked up all the flour, then continue mixing for another minute or two.)
  • Cover mixer bowl and let the dough rest in a warm oven (maybe 120-130 degrees) for 10 minutes.
  • Remove dough from oven.
To process dough:
  • Divide the dough into two equal-sized pieces.
  • Scale one piece of dough to 15.02 oz (426 g). (The second piece of dough will weigh just under 15 oz, but it's OK.)
  • Round the two pieces of dough as tightly as possible into dough balls. (This dough is too stiff to round as perfectly as a NY style dough ball, but you should still be able to form a reasonably tight, smooth dough ball.)
  • Place each dough ball on a cookie sheet with the seam side down.
  • Cover the dough.
  • Place in warm oven for 30 minutes.
To prepare dough skin:
  • Remove the cookie sheet and dough balls from the oven.
  • Take the slightly-heavier dough ball from the pan.
  • (OPTIONAL: Put the cookie sheet and remaining dough ball back in the slightly-warm oven.)
  • On your work surface, press the dough ball flat.
  • Roll the dough with a rolling pin, attempting to keep the dough as round as possible, as well as a consistent thickness.
  • Whenever the dough becomes sticky enough to disrupt the ease of rolling it, rub a VERY SMALL amount of flour (maybe a large pinch) onto the entire surface of both sides of the dough, just to remove the excess stickiness.
  • Continue rolling the skin as round as possible.
  • When the skin appears to be just over 14", place a 14" pan over the skin to find out if the skin is big enough to trim.
  • If the skin is slightly larger than the pan, leave the skin alone to relax for 10 minutes. (The skin should be kind of stuck to the work surface at this point. Do not peel the dough skin from the work surface.)
  • After resting for 10 minutes, use your 14" pan and a pizza wheel to trim the dough into a round skin.
  • Pull up the scraps and set the scraps aside.
  • Weigh the skin. It will probably be about 14 oz at this point. Your goal is to end up with a skin that weighs 13.08 oz (371 g).
Next, some repetition:
  • Continue rolling the dough, trying to keep the thickness as consistent as possible.
  • When the dough appears to be just a bit larger than 14", check the size with your 14" pan.
  • If the skin is slightly larger than the pan, leave the skin alone to relax for 10 minutes.
Final steps in producing the dough skin:
  • After the rest, use your 14" pan and a pizza wheel to trim the dough into a round skin.
  • Pull up the scraps and combine with earlier scraps, then place all scraps beneath the remaining dough ball (to incorporate the scraps onto the remaining dough ball).
  • Weigh the skin. Again, your target weight is 13.08 oz (371 g).
  • If your dough is close to your target weight, sprinkle a couple pinches of cornmeal on your work surface.
  • Place the dough skin atop the cornmeal.
  • Roll the skin to at least 15" but no more than 16", trying to keep the skin as round as possible. DEFINITELY DO NOT USE ANY BENCH FLOUR FOR THIS because you want the skin to stick to the work surface so you can leave it alone for another rest. (The reason you need to roll the skin to 15-16" is because the skin will shrink. If you only roll it to 14", you'll end up with a 12" or 13" skin that's too thick, which also throws off every other measurement.)
  • Take a break for 10 minutes.
  • Dock the dough skin, using only one pass over every part of the skin (which is probably three parallel passes).
Cooling the dough skin:
  • Remove the skin from your work surface.
  • Sprinkle another pinch or two of cornmeal on a flat pan (cutter pan) that's larger than your dough skin.
  • Place the pan and skin in freezer.
  • Take a break, then go back to Step 1 of "To prepare dough skin" and follow every step up to this point with the second dough ball.
  • Leave the skin(s) in freezer for an hour or two.
Further dough skin prep:
  • Remove skin from freezer.
  • Spray the outer area of the TOP of the frozen skin with nonstick spray.
  • Place the skin on a dark/seasoned 14" perforated coupe style pan.
  • Cover the skin with plastic wrap and place the pan/skin in refrigerator.
Dough management:
  • Leave the skin(s) in refrigerator for 48 hours, with each skin covered snugly on top with plastic wrap.
  • 3-5 hours before you intend to bake the pizza(s), remove the skin(s) from refrigerator and leave at room temperature, on the appropriate 14" perforated coupe style pan.
  • When the time is right, (say, 2-4 hours later), heat your oven and stone to 500 (or 550 if your oven goes that high).
While the oven is heating up, assemble the pizza(s), using:

8 oz - Sauce - 227 g
7.67 oz - Provolone cheese - 218 g
4.8 oz - Pepperoni - 136 g
  • Distribute sauce all the way to the edges of the skin, using gravity. (Donatos sauce is much more of a liquid than just about every other sauce out there.)
  • For cheese pizza, add a couple more ounces of cheese.
  • Shake a liberal amount of romano mix (maybe 80% romano and 20% oregano) on the unbaked pizza.
  • Bake on the dark perforated coupe style pan, on a stone, for about 9 minutes.
  • Cut pizza. (5 cuts x 2 cuts.).
Based on some notes I found, I apparently baked at least one Donatos style pizza at about 625 degrees. That's probably too hot for this kind of pizza, but if your oven can produce that kind of temperature, you might as well give it a try just to see how it turns out.

I think that's pretty complete. I'll probably post at least a couple pictures here shortly.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #44 on: July 17, 2014, 03:27:48 PM »
Here are the only two Donatos clone pics I haven't already shared on the boards. This pizza is from May 9, 2014. Judging by the fact that some of the cheese and pepperoni have obviously escaped the pizza, I can say for sure that I baked this one directly on stone. I'm not sure if I had my new oven when I made this one, and I can't remember if I've actually baked any Donatos style pizzas in my new oven. So right now I'm guessing this was baked in my old oven, which couldn't get the stone any hotter than 520. Regardless of which oven this was baked in, I like how the bottom of this pizza looks.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #45 on: July 17, 2014, 03:47:00 PM »
Here's a very thorough recap of how I've been doing Donatos clones most recently. If anything is confusing, please let me know so I can make it less confusing. I'd say this represents my best-yet formula and workflow, but I'm sure a lot can be done to improve on how I've been doing it. Whenever I specify a brand name ingredient, it's just a suggestion. However, whenever I specify a brand name ingredient, it's because that brand has given me the best results so far. Particularly the tomato paste I suggest.

My Current Donatos Clone Dough Formula (based largely on Wazatron's formula)
100% Superlative flour (bread flour)
37% HOT WATER (as hot as the tap goes)
0.5% IDY
1.5% Salt
4% Vegetable oil
1.5% Nonfat dry milk
11% Egg***
1% Sugar

***With egg, I usually give the percentage a little wiggle room, from about 8% to about 12%, since one egg usually weighs about the right amount to constitute something in the neighborhood of 8-12% of a dough batch based on 19.17 oz (543 g) of flour. If one egg weighs a little more or less than my target egg weight (at 11% egg), I simply adjust the egg percentage a little on my spreadsheet before I make the dough. If I have to decrease the egg percentage by, say, 2% percent (because my egg weighs 49 g, rather than 59.8 g), I adjust the hydration percentage inversely to the change in egg percentage. So if you have to decrease the egg from 11% to 9%, increase the hydration from 37% to 39%.

Here's a less confusing way of saying what I said in the previous paragraph: Just make sure the hydration and egg percentages add up to 48%.

If you have soft water, you may need to decrease the hydration 2-3%

Recipe for 30 oz of dough
19.17 oz - Flour - 543 g
7.09 oz - HOT WATER - 201 g
0.86 tsp - IDY - 2.7 g
1.67 tsp - Salt - 8.2 g
0.77 oz - Oil - 22 g
0.29 oz - Nonfat dry milk - 8.2 g
2.11 oz - Egg - 59.8 g
1.57 tsp - Sugar - 5.4 g

Sauce
12 oz KROGER tomato paste ("Italian style" or something like that)
22-24 oz Water
1/2 tsp Dry basil
1/2 tsp Salt
1 tsp Sugar

To make dough:
  • Measure all dough ingredients.
  • Combine dry ingredients in mixer bowl.
  • Add wet ingredients to the mixer bowl.
  • If you have a KA mixer with a spiral dough hook, mix for 7 minutes on speed 2. (If you don't have a spiral dough hook, mix until the dough has picked up all the flour, then continue mixing for another minute or two.)
  • Cover mixer bowl and let the dough rest in a warm oven (maybe 120-130 degrees) for 10 minutes.
  • Remove dough from oven.
To process dough:
  • Divide the dough into two equal-sized pieces.
  • Scale one piece of dough to 15.02 oz (426 g). (The second piece of dough will weigh just under 15 oz, but it's OK.)
  • Round the two pieces of dough as tightly as possible into dough balls. (This dough is too stiff to round as perfectly as a NY style dough ball, but you should still be able to form a reasonably tight, smooth dough ball.)
  • Place each dough ball on a cookie sheet with the seam side down.
  • Cover the dough.
  • Place in warm oven for 30 minutes.
To prepare dough skin:
  • Remove the cookie sheet and dough balls from the oven.
  • Take the slightly-heavier dough ball from the pan.
  • (OPTIONAL: Put the cookie sheet and remaining dough ball back in the slightly-warm oven.)
  • On your work surface, press the dough ball flat.
  • Roll the dough with a rolling pin, attempting to keep the dough as round as possible, as well as a consistent thickness.
  • Whenever the dough becomes sticky enough to disrupt the ease of rolling it, rub a VERY SMALL amount of flour (maybe a large pinch) onto the entire surface of both sides of the dough, just to remove the excess stickiness.
  • Continue rolling the skin as round as possible.
  • When the skin appears to be just over 14", place a 14" pan over the skin to find out if the skin is big enough to trim.
  • If the skin is slightly larger than the pan, leave the skin alone to relax for 10 minutes. (The skin should be kind of stuck to the work surface at this point. Do not peel the dough skin from the work surface.)
  • After resting for 10 minutes, use your 14" pan and a pizza wheel to trim the dough into a round skin.
  • Pull up the scraps and set the scraps aside.
  • Weigh the skin. It will probably be about 14 oz at this point. Your goal is to end up with a skin that weighs 13.08 oz (371 g).
Next, some repetition:
  • Continue rolling the dough, trying to keep the thickness as consistent as possible.
  • When the dough appears to be just a bit larger than 14", check the size with your 14" pan.
  • If the skin is slightly larger than the pan, leave the skin alone to relax for 10 minutes.
Final steps in producing the dough skin:
  • After the rest, use your 14" pan and a pizza wheel to trim the dough into a round skin.
  • Pull up the scraps and combine with earlier scraps, then place all scraps beneath the remaining dough ball (to incorporate the scraps onto the remaining dough ball).
  • Weigh the skin. Again, your target weight is 13.08 oz (371 g).
  • If your dough is close to your target weight, sprinkle a couple pinches of cornmeal on your work surface.
  • Place the dough skin atop the cornmeal.
  • Roll the skin to at least 15" but no more than 16", trying to keep the skin as round as possible. DEFINITELY DO NOT USE ANY BENCH FLOUR FOR THIS because you want the skin to stick to the work surface so you can leave it alone for another rest. (The reason you need to roll the skin to 15-16" is because the skin will shrink. If you only roll it to 14", you'll end up with a 12" or 13" skin that's too thick, which also throws off every other measurement.)
  • Take a break for 10 minutes.
  • Dock the dough skin, using only one pass over every part of the skin (which is probably three parallel passes).
Cooling the dough skin:
  • Remove the skin from your work surface.
  • Sprinkle another pinch or two of cornmeal on a flat pan (cutter pan) that's larger than your dough skin.
  • Place the pan and skin in freezer.
  • Take a break, then go back to Step 1 of "To prepare dough skin" and follow every step up to this point with the second dough ball.
  • Leave the skin(s) in freezer for an hour or two.
Further dough skin prep:
  • Remove skin from freezer.
  • Spray the outer area of the TOP of the frozen skin with nonstick spray.
  • Place the skin on a dark/seasoned 14" perforated coupe style pan.
  • Cover the skin with plastic wrap and place the pan/skin in refrigerator.
Dough management:
  • Leave the skin(s) in refrigerator for 48 hours, with each skin covered snugly on top with plastic wrap.
  • 3-5 hours before you intend to bake the pizza(s), remove the skin(s) from refrigerator and leave at room temperature, on the appropriate 14" perforated coupe style pan.
  • When the time is right, (say, 2-4 hours later), heat your oven and stone to 500 (or 550 if your oven goes that high).
While the oven is heating up, assemble the pizza(s), using:

8 oz - Sauce - 227 g
7.67 oz - Provolone cheese - 218 g
4.8 oz - Pepperoni - 136 g
  • Distribute sauce all the way to the edges of the skin, using gravity. (Donatos sauce is much more of a liquid than just about every other sauce out there.)
  • For cheese pizza, add a couple more ounces of cheese.
  • Shake a liberal amount of romano mix (maybe 80% romano and 20% oregano) on the unbaked pizza.
  • Bake on the dark perforated coupe style pan, on a stone, for about 9 minutes.
  • Cut pizza. (5 cuts x 2 cuts.).
Based on some notes I found, I apparently baked at least one Donatos style pizza at about 625 degrees. That's probably too hot for this kind of pizza, but if your oven can produce that kind of temperature, you might as well give it a try just to see how it turns out.

I think that's pretty complete. I'll probably post at least a couple pictures here shortly.
that is an awesome post right there...thanks Ryan.   :chef:
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #46 on: July 17, 2014, 03:59:14 PM »
Ryan,

I agree with Bob. Very nice job.

To what you have said, I might mention that if members have 14" pizza screens or disks, they are very useful as templates to cut out 14" skins from larger-sized skins.

Peter


Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #47 on: July 17, 2014, 04:27:43 PM »
To what you have said, I might mention that if members have 14" pizza screens or disks, they are very useful as templates to cut out 14" skins from larger-sized skins.

Yes, very useful. I didn't mention this in the long post (to avoid confusion), but I actually tend to use a 16" screen as a template for the second/final trim, which eliminates the need to roll the skin a third time. A 15" screen would probably work better, though, as I don't think this dough shrinks nearly as much as Tommy's/Shakey's/fazzari style skins, which are all made of noticeably stiffer dough, as well as laminated. However, I don't have a 15" anything.

Oh, and by the way, with the two changes I've made to the sauce since I resumed doing Donatos style a few months ago (using specifically Kroger Italian Style paste and adding 1 tsp sugar), I cannot tell the difference between Donatos sauce and my Donatos clone sauce.

Thanks fellas.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #48 on: July 17, 2014, 04:35:24 PM »
However, I don't have a 15" anything.

D'OH! Yes I do. I have a 15" perforated coupe style pan. So maybe I actually do think a 16" template works better than 15" (but forgot what I think).
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Donatos Pizza Recipe
« Reply #49 on: July 17, 2014, 11:56:09 PM »
Ryan,

Can you tell me when you worked at Donatos, and if they were using the frozen skins at that time?

And did you note differences in the Donatos crusts over the years that you had their pizzas?

Peter


 

pizzapan