Author Topic: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR  (Read 10224 times)

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Offline robert40

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Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« on: February 29, 2008, 06:36:56 PM »
I can't seem to find a discussion about Apizza Scholls. Anybody been?
http://www.apizzascholls.com/


Offline shango

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #1 on: February 29, 2008, 07:49:32 PM »
Weird.  I was just having a discussion involving this place today, on a local dining forum...

http://www.donrockwell.com/index.php?showtopic=8663

it's down at the bottom of the page.
pizza, pizza, pizza

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #2 on: February 29, 2008, 08:10:17 PM »
About a year ago, one of our members, David, provided a link to an interesting round table discussion that included Brian Spangler, of Apizza Scholls, at http://portlandfood.org/index.php?showtopic=988&st=0.

Peter

Offline robert40

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #3 on: February 29, 2008, 08:19:28 PM »
Weird.  I was just having a discussion involving this place today, on a local dining forum...

http://www.donrockwell.com/index.php?showtopic=8663

it's down at the bottom of the page.

Which I seen and gave me the idea to start this thread. :-D

Offline Grog

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2008, 01:24:28 AM »
I don't see any reviews, so here are my recollections from when I went to Apizza Scholls in December.  My party waited 40 minutes to get a table on a Wednesday night.  We ordered a 'traditional' pizza -- sausage and pepperoni, if I'm remembering correctly.  The pizza was ok, nothing special.  The crust was too crispy, probably due to a low temp oven, and bland.  The texture was unremarkable, and the ingredients were above average but forgettable.  I devoted a lot of attention to my meal, trying to figure out the fuss over this place.  They did serve a delicious soda called Cane Cola, or something like that, which is loaded with sugar (not high fructose corn syrup) and flavored with nutmeg.  The soda left an impression, but the pizza did not. 

If you're in Portland, try Ken's Artisan Pizza.  This was another place with a 40-minute wait.  However, they served excellent charred-but-soft pizzas from a carefully tended wood burning oven, with high quality ingredients.  The building, waitstaff, decor, and bathroom fixtures (seriously, you have to see the hand dryer) were all top notch.  KAP is an impressive achievement, even for Portland, which has the best restaurant scene of any mid-sized city in America.  I'd go as far to say that KAP has the best pizza on the West Coast (although I have only been to KAP, Apizza Scholls, Mozza, and Antica -- I haven't been to the Bay area pizzerias yet).  This will be the place I revisit next time I'm in Portland.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 01:26:18 AM by Grog »

Offline scott r

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2008, 02:30:22 AM »
if apizza scholls didn't beat out antica or mozza I am scared.   These two are probably the worst of the "destination" pizzerias I have been to.  Would you say Apizza Scholls was at least better than those two?  Brians use of a preferment and ultra wet dough should make for a decent crust, No?
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 03:40:54 AM by scott r »

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2008, 03:20:39 AM »
I don't see any reviews, so here are my recollections from when I went to Apizza Scholls in December.  My party waited 40 minutes to get a table on a Wednesday night.  We ordered a 'traditional' pizza -- sausage and pepperoni, if I'm remembering correctly.  The pizza was ok, nothing special.  The crust was too crispy, probably due to a low temp oven, and bland.  The texture was unremarkable, and the ingredients were above average but forgettable.  I devoted a lot of attention to my meal, trying to figure out the fuss over this place.  They did serve a delicious soda called Cane Cola, or something like that, which is loaded with sugar (not high fructose corn syrup) and flavored with nutmeg.  The soda left an impression, but the pizza did not. 

If you're in Portland, try Ken's Artisan Pizza.  This was another place with a 40-minute wait.  However, they served excellent charred-but-soft pizzas from a carefully tended wood burning oven, with high quality ingredients.  The building, waitstaff, decor, and bathroom fixtures (seriously, you have to see the hand dryer) were all top notch.  KAP is an impressive achievement, even for Portland, which has the best restaurant scene of any mid-sized city in America.  I'd go as far to say that KAP has the best pizza on the West Coast (although I have only been to KAP, Apizza Scholls, Mozza, and Antica -- I haven't been to the Bay area pizzerias yet).  This will be the place I revisit next time I'm in Portland.

Here is my non-review thoughts on Apizza Scholls and places like it. Firstly it has gotten rave reviews from people I know who have food palates that run contrary to normalcy. These people will pass up eating the turkey on Thanksgiving for a bowl of dry granola. The pizza delivery car most frequently visiting their house is Domino's. Strike one!

Waiting outside for 40 minutes (I have heard of longer waits outside followed up by long waits at the table) is not something I am willing to do. Pizza Nazi's don't do it for me. Strike two!

Telling the customer that they have ordered too many toppings is nonsense. Give them what they want. Reminds me of the Francis Ford Coppola restaurant in San Francisco that refused to let us take pizza's out to our office at lunchtime. Meanwhile the place was empty, great business tactics always impress me. Strike three!

I prefer to improve my skills at pizza making by reading this board, buying tons of supplies I can pass down to the children someday (LOL) and practicing a lot.

btw - In 2.5 years in Portland I have not been blown away by the restaurants. San Francisco is far superior in all cuisines when last I left it.

Offline November

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2008, 03:40:28 AM »
These people will pass up eating the turkey on Thanksgiving for a bowl of dry granola.

My non-review thoughts on your non-review thoughts is that you should express more non-review thoughts.  That was a most eloquent statement.

Offline Grog

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2008, 04:02:38 PM »
Scott R -- when you say preferment, do you mean a natural starter?  If a starter was used, I couldn't tell.  The crust was bland and crunchy, on par with what I make in my 500-degree oven with IDY when I get an ill-timed phone call and accidentally leave the pizza in for 10 minutes.  It did not have the char or texture of what I expect from a wood fired brick oven.  Maybe they use one of those gas fired abominations, like at the noxious Red Brick chain?  I would rate Apizza Scholls well below Mozza and Antica.  (But I enjoyed Mozza, where everything but the crust was exceptional.)

I did not know much about Apizza Scholls before visiting except that it was supposed to be one of the best pizzerias in the NW.  As my review indicated, the pizza did not support the buzz.  Virtually every marquee pizzeria I have visited recently was better, and that includes Luzzo's, UPN, Naples 45, Ken's Artisan Pizza, Red Rocks, Moroni Bros., 2 Amys, Settebello, and Mozza.   The service I received was solid, without any of the pizza-Nazi antics that I have read about since.  (Did we just trigger Godwin's law in a pizza forum?) 

Pizza-Not_War -- I think that 'ordinary' people (i.e, those who do not read this forum and make pizzas obsessively) lack the palate and the experience to judge pizza.  If during the past year I ate at Domino's, Pizza Hut, Hungry Howies, Little Ceasars, and Papa Johns, perhaps Apizza Scholls would be the best pizza I ever ate.  When deciding which pizzerias to visit, I tend to rely more on the judgment of members of this forum, who are able to debate the relative merits of Bianco vs. Luzzo's vs. UPN vs. Mozza, etc. 

On that note, let me reiterate that I was blown away by Ken's Artisan Pizza and rank it among the best in the U.S.  Has anyone else been there?

Offline scott r

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2008, 09:28:24 PM »
Grog, a preferment and natural yeast (sourdough culture) are two different things.  A preferment uses commercial yeast (idy ady or cake yeast). For a prefermented dough a portion of the flour, yeast, and water from the recipe is left to ferment and is incorporated with the remaining ingredients at a later time.  It is a great way to get extra flavor out of your dough if you are not looking for any tang from a sourdough.  I know that Brian uses one, but that certainly doesn't mean that his pizza is exceptional.  Thanks for the review!


Offline robert40

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2008, 05:46:40 PM »
Here is my non-review thoughts on Apizza Scholls and places like it. Firstly it has gotten rave reviews from people I know who have food palates that run contrary to normalcy. These people will pass up eating the turkey on Thanksgiving for a bowl of dry granola. The pizza delivery car most frequently visiting their house is Domino's. Strike one!

Waiting outside for 40 minutes (I have heard of longer waits outside followed up by long waits at the table) is not something I am willing to do. Pizza Nazi's don't do it for me. Strike two!

Telling the customer that they have ordered too many toppings is nonsense. Give them what they want. Reminds me of the Francis Ford Coppola restaurant in San Francisco that refused to let us take pizza's out to our office at lunchtime. Meanwhile the place was empty, great business tactics always impress me. Strike three!

I prefer to improve my skills at pizza making by reading this board, buying tons of supplies I can pass down to the children someday (LOL) and practicing a lot.

btw - In 2.5 years in Portland I have not been blown away by the restaurants. San Francisco is far superior in all cuisines when last I left it.
Do I understand you correctly that you have not been?

Offline robert40

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2008, 07:21:36 PM »
I don't see any reviews, so here are my recollections from when I went to Apizza Scholls in December.  My party waited 40 minutes to get a table on a Wednesday night.  We ordered a 'traditional' pizza -- sausage and pepperoni, if I'm remembering correctly.  The pizza was ok, nothing special.  The crust was too crispy, probably due to a low temp oven, and bland.  The texture was unremarkable, and the ingredients were above average but forgettable.  I devoted a lot of attention to my meal, trying to figure out the fuss over this place.  They did serve a delicious soda called Cane Cola, or something like that, which is loaded with sugar (not high fructose corn syrup) and flavored with nutmeg.  The soda left an impression, but the pizza did not. 

If you're in Portland, try Ken's Artisan Pizza.  This was another place with a 40-minute wait.  However, they served excellent charred-but-soft pizzas from a carefully tended wood burning oven, with high quality ingredients.  The building, waitstaff, decor, and bathroom fixtures (seriously, you have to see the hand dryer) were all top notch.  KAP is an impressive achievement, even for Portland, which has the best restaurant scene of any mid-sized city in America.  I'd go as far to say that KAP has the best pizza on the West Coast (although I have only been to KAP, Apizza Scholls, Mozza, and Antica -- I haven't been to the Bay area pizzerias yet).  This will be the place I revisit next time I'm in Portland.
I have yet to visit Apizza Scholls so I can't speak from first hand experience. But I was wondering if you could have been mistaken in remembering ordering sausage and pepperoni? From all the press I have read and Apizza Scholls website itself it states one can only order a single meat topping per pizza.

Offline SteveVit

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2008, 03:15:49 PM »
 I've been to Apizza Scholl’s 3 times and this place packs in a mad crowd, I've waited 2 hours for a table on a Friday night. For the most part these guys make a decent pie but the rave reviews make it sound like it should be in the pizza hall of fame.  Apizza Scholl’s really lets you know they use the best products available and this helps making a decent pizza. I find the sauce and cheese acceptable but the crust gets a little funky. I noticed Grog said the crust was too crispy, I find that to be an understatement. The crust was so dry and crisp it was inedible - and I wasn't alone. Next time you go to Apizza Scholl’s glance around and you'll notice heaps and heaps of uneaten crust.  I've made a few pizzas and the only way I can a crunch like that is with a low temperature.  I find it odd their web page says "The best pizzas are baked in extremely hot ovens ranging from 650º F – 900ºF." instead of "our pizzas are baked at whatever temperature." Pizzas I've made in that temperature range are way different. I read they don't use high gluten flour because it's too white and pasty so maybe it's the flour. I have used all purpose, cake flour and Italian 00 flours and have not made a crisp pizza in a high temp oven so I'm sure they have some sort of secret to the crisp factor. The "Apizza ‘Margo’rita" was decent. The cheese and sauce were acceptable, the crust was not.  The "New York White Pie" was a disappointment.  I feel the pie was overcooked and dried out even when topped with a liberal amount of olive oil which dripped down my arm (not a bad thing). The cheese was browned which for me kills the texture and changes the whole dynamic of the pie. In all honesty it was the worst white pie I've ever had.

 Went to Ken's Artisan Pizza last night.  It's a nice place filled with Portland’s hip crowd.  The oven and pizza makers are in plain site so you can take a peek at all action which actually makes the place seem less artisan. Overall the pizza is well made and nice looking.  The crust had a very nice texture and lots of flavor, the sauce was bright red, cheese was Belgioioso like which is not a bad thing and topped with basil.  I found it to be just a little on the dry side and I might have liked just a little more sauce near the crust.  The center of each slice was real thin and reminded me of the first few bites of a slice at Patsy's.  There was something strange about the pizza and it took me a few slices to figure it out.  I kept getting a Thai vibe as I munched on the pie.  First there was a slight spiciness to the sauce, I guess they use red pepper flakes in the sauce.  Why put red pepper in your sauce when you can throw a pinch on each slice before you eat it?  I don't get it.  So spiciness aside the Thai vibe was still there.  I thought it was Thai basil at first but noticed the sauce was spiked with fennel seeds.  I've never tasted, seen or heard of a pizza sauce made with fennel seed or red pepper flakes.  I’ve used fennel when making sausage and biscotti but I think it's an odd thing to add to sauce. Overall I like the place and I think it is the best pizza I've had in Portland.

These two places get rave reviews all the time everywhere.  I'm sure the reviews are from people that have never been so some of the places listed below.

The top three Pizza
DiFara's (B'klyn)
Top Road Tavern & Pizza (Trenton, NJ) NJ's best tomato pie!
Palermo's (Bordentown, NJ) NJ's second best tomato pie!

Great Pizza
DeMarco's (NYC)
Patsy's (NYC)
Grimaldi's (B'klyn)
Totonno's (B'klyn)
Frank Pepe's (New Haven, CT)
Vic's (Bradley Beach, NJ)
Santillo's Brick Oven Pizza (Elizabeth, NJ)
Delorenzo's (Trenton, NJ on Hamilton Ave)

Honarable mentions
John's (NYC)
Sal & Carmines (NYC)
Sac's (Queens)
Denino's (Staten Island)
Joe & Pat's (Staten Island)
Brooklyn's (Hackensack, NJ)
Delorenzo's (Trenton, NJ on Hudson St)
Delucias (Raritian, NJ)
Maruca's (Seaside Park, NJ)
Scorintino's (South Amboy, NJ)
Kate & Al's (Columbus Market, NJ)
Spirto's (Elizabeth, NJ)
Coffaro's (South River, NJ)
Pepe's (Seaside, NJ) r.i.p. 1970's
Zaffiro's (Milwaukie, WI)
Santucci's Square Pizza (Philly, PA)
Apizza Scholls (Portland, OR)
Ken's Artisan Pizza (Portland, OR)

Highly Overrated
L & B Spufunky Gardens (B'klyn)
Kinchley's (Ramsey, NJ)
Rizzo's (Queens)
Pete and Elda's Bar (Neptune, NJ)
Federici's (Freehold, NJ)
Strawberry's (Woodbridge, NJ)
Escape from NY (Portland, OR)
The Blind Onion (Portland, OR)
Juliano's (Vancouver, WA)



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Offline robert40

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #13 on: July 24, 2008, 10:47:45 AM »

Offline addicted

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2008, 06:01:46 PM »
  We went about two weeks ago. We went on a thursday so there was no wait at all. I have read the poor service reviews but ours was perfect. Ordered the best caesar salad I have ever ate. As far as the pizza goes we ordered a Margerita(O) and a sausage. The sauce was excellent tasting of fresh garlic, basil, and sea salt with just the right amount of acidity. Italian sausage was loaded with fennel and had the perfect blend of fat. The cheese was moist but not too moist to make the pie seem wet. Now for the crust. The thinnest I have ever had and stayed straight when you lifted it. Very crispy and crackly, but I would have to agree it was a little dry. Now I like a little char as well on my pizza, but I see how some people could say it has a little too much. I think char that comes from a wood fired oven is just different compared to a standard one. It doesent taste right without the smokiness. I will eat there again but I dont think I will let myself get over excited. I have eaten at Bianco twice, and you can smell his oven when you take the pizza box home with you, and I just didnt get that with apizza scholls pies when I took them home. However I admire Mr. Spanglers dedication and passion the same as Bianco's and will definitely become a patron.
Well....okay,then.

Offline cranky

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2009, 08:07:37 AM »
I read about this place on some list of great pizza places.  My wife and I stopped when we were in Portland to check it out.  We had a half suasage half margherita.  The hype raised expectations.  The pizza was disappointing.  They do not know tomatos and sauce.  The sausage was not that good.  The pizza looks good, but if this place was in NY it would generate no excitement, zilch.   If anyone thinks this is great pizza they have never had even good pizza.   

Offline Wazatron

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2009, 01:44:31 PM »
I was fortunate enough to eat at three amazing pizza places over this past week (Apizza Scholls, Ken’s Artisan, and Serious Pie in Seattle) and I have to say that Apizza Scholls was head and shoulders the best pie, and quite frankly I’m surprised at the reviews posted here that are so negative against it.

My expectations for A.S. were admittedly lowered after reading this thread before going, but the pizza changed all that. Yes, it’s a very charred pizza, but in no way is it overly charred or dry. I did not see one scrap of leftover crust on anyone’s plate (and I was paying close attention for this). The crust was very crisp, but right under the crisp the dough was very light, tender, and full of FLAVOR. Not dry in the least. And as one poster above mentioned, you could actually pick up a huge slice without it flopping around like a wet noodle, spilling sauce and toppings everywhere. This by itself is fantastic. Why some people associate soggy, mushy centers with high-quality pizza is beyond me.

My wife and I got one pizza, which was half Coastal (the Margherita plus Scalia anchovies) and half Tartufo Bianco (Mozzarella, pecorino romano with Truffle Oil & sea salt). Both were fantastic. And they certainly do know tomatoes and sauce – the sauce was by far the best we tasted over the week: fresh, clean, bright – a wonderful contrast to the crisp and tender dough.  As far as getting bent out of shape about the limitations on toppings… if you really want to complain, I wouldn’t hold it against you, but seriously, he’s right. Who in their right mind would want to overload such a wonderful crust and sauce experience with eight different meats and three kinds of heavy cheeses? The people calling all the national chains for delivery pizza, that’s who. A truly discerning pallet would not count this as a knock against Brian Spangler, but recognize it as truth and appreciate that he cares enough about his pies to enforce it.

At any rate, In comparison to Apizza Scholls, Ken’s Artisan was thoroughly underwhelming. First of all the wait was twice as long as A.S., and the crowd was twice as pretentious. At Ken's we got the Fennel Sausage and Onion and the mushroom pizza: the pies were very good, but nowhere near the hype. The crust was overly tough/chewy and rather bland. The sauce had been messed with too much, and the center was a wet spongy mess. The mushroom pizza was going for presentation over substance – the mushroom selections were tough as well. For the quality of mushrooms used, the pie was, again, rather bland. You really needed to use the on-the-side provided chunky sea-salt flakes to bring out any kind of flavor. If Apizza Scholls couldn't make it in NY, there's no way Ken's could either.

Again, after eating at both places, I’m very surprised at most of the reactions from “real” pizza lovers. Perhaps it’s just that Apizza Scholls simply isn’t trying to do true Neapolitan pizza, and anything ain’t Neapolitan ain’t good pizza (which is a total joke).  Not only did Ken’s fall short of A.S., it also fell way short of Serious Pie in Seattle (http://www.tomdouglas.com/restaurants/serious-pie). I might post a review of that on another thread to keep this more on-focus, but Serious Pie was worlds better than Ken’s as well. Better flavor, better sauce, better ingredients… better all around. They also do an oblong pie as opposed to a true round, which helps eliminate that awful soggy center. Serious Pie is unique, and fantastic. You can get “Ken’s” in almost any city that does Neapolitan pizzas. In fact here in Denver I’d have to say that Marco’s (http://www.marcoscoalfiredpizza.com/) and Via Baci (http://www.viabaci.com/) are just as good, if not better, than Ken’s. I’m going to go back to each here again soon for a ‘new’ comparison.

So If you haven’t gone to Apizza Scholls yet, keep in mind that they are NOT TRYING to make yet another Neapolitan wood-fired pizza. They are simply trying to make a fantastic pizza, and they certainly have. I felt like a little kid at a family pizzeria again. I’d certainly put it in my top 5 pizza places: a list that disregards what “style” of pizza it is.

I’m going to post some pictures of Apizza Scholls and Ken’s below. They are “leftovers” pictures, so they aren’t completely fair to either place, but they are at least equal to each other. You can see in the pictures that Apizza Scholl’s pie has a richer color, and not nearly charred too much.

Which pie looks better to you? :)
« Last Edit: June 22, 2009, 01:56:12 PM by Wazatron »

Offline Wazatron

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2009, 01:45:13 PM »
Now the pics of Ken's

Offline pcampbell

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #18 on: June 22, 2009, 04:59:11 PM »
having never been there, their website is interesting.  The piece of pizza on there looks burnt to me.


http://www.apizzascholls.com/upskirt.jpg

They are using what looks to me like Baker's pride electric deck ovens.

How big are these pizzas that they charge $20 for?
« Last Edit: June 22, 2009, 05:59:49 PM by pcampbell »
Patrick

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Re: Apizza Scholls. Portland, OR
« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2009, 07:23:32 PM »
Patrick,

From what I have read, Brian Spangler makes 18" pizzas. According to a recent PBS segment, which I found at http://www.wpr.org/search/index.cfm?searchbox=reinhart&x=14&y=12, Brian is using a gas-fired oven (according to a statement made by Peter Reinhart). Brian also no longer kneads the dough by hand as noted at his website. He is now using a mixer although he does talk in the above referenced PBS segment about the merits of hand kneading. It also sounds like Brian is using IDY for his dough. He also talks about cheeses in the PBS segment. Additional insights into his dough, and his sauce as well, at least as of a couple of years ago, can be found at http://www.portlandfood.org/index.php?showtopic=988&st=0. You will also note a brief discussion on the use of organic flour, which is a subject I know you are very interested in.

There is more on the char issue at http://www.portlandfood.org/index.php?showtopic=2791&st=560.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 22, 2009, 08:48:20 PM by Pete-zza »


 

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