Author Topic: Greek pizza  (Read 128678 times)

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Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #350 on: February 18, 2012, 10:35:39 PM »
^^I hear ya :chef:
« Last Edit: February 19, 2012, 01:02:50 PM by CDNpielover »


Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #351 on: February 19, 2012, 01:03:22 PM »
CDN,
 I think the pizzas in your pictures look awesome, no matter what they're called. What can you tell us about the type of cheese be used? Cheddar, mozz. or maybe a blend?
 I'm intrigued at the idea of using baking powder and club soda in the dough. I think some experiments are in order! :D

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #352 on: February 19, 2012, 01:16:35 PM »
Dear Ev,

I do not really know what kind of cheese is used, or how that might vary among the different operators.  I've read that Atlas Pizza (in some of the pictures above) uses mozzarella and cheddar from Alberta Cheese (http://www.albertacheese.com), but I'm not sure if the cheese is blended and in what proportions.  I'm also not too sure how reliable that information is, but the person who said that claimed to have worked at Atlas Pizza.

The dough ingredients (baking powder, club soda, flour, yeast, salt, sugar, salt, oil) were from the same internet source, but again I am not sure how reliable that is.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2012, 01:32:05 PM by CDNpielover »

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #353 on: February 19, 2012, 01:23:34 PM »
Ok, thanks.

buceriasdon

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #354 on: February 19, 2012, 02:59:00 PM »
CDN, Yes, I find the club soda idea to be intriguing. I've used 7up and liked it.
Don


Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #355 on: February 19, 2012, 03:09:32 PM »
Don,

I like the soda water idea too, and thanks for sharing your sucess story with the 7UP.  I assume you just used it in place of the water, keeping the mass the same?

I think I will give this a try on my next pizza, probably next weekend.  I would actually like to to try adapting Peter's Greek MA#2 formulation (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg144180.html#msg144180) to include club soda and baking powder.  I need to figure out how much baking powder and yeast would be appropriate, and if I would have to adjust the amount of club soda to account for the baking powder.  I'm not famjiliar with baking powder in pizza, but I did find a website that mentioned the use of both yeast and baking powder in dough (http://www.ehow.com/how_8075420_add-baking-powder-pizza-dough.html#ixzz1mr1nso4M).  I don't know how reliable that page is, but it is a start at least!   :chef:

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #356 on: February 19, 2012, 03:20:53 PM »
Here is a video showing pizza preparation at Nick's Steakhouse and Pizza (http://www.nickssteakandpizza.com/), another Calgary institution serving what we call "Greek" pizza.  You can see that they are cooking in pans, and it looks like the dough has been rising for some time in the pan.  The cheese isn't out to the edge like a "Bar" pizza (which as I now understand it is a type of greek pizza).  There are some nice shots of the bottom of the crust, but I don't know to what degree it is fried as I haven't been to Nick's in about 6 years!  They are cooking at 600 F for about 8 - 10 minutes.  

« Last Edit: February 19, 2012, 03:32:01 PM by CDNpielover »

buceriasdon

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #357 on: February 19, 2012, 03:41:13 PM »
CDN, I will be revisiting adding something like 7up, gingerale, what have you in the next couple of weeks to dough, but my memory of past experiments was I found using all 7up made the dough too sweet for my taste and somewhat off tasting. I ended up with a percentage of soft drink to water. Since I will be starting with a clean slate, so to speak, I will be looking at soft drinks again as perhaps a sweetener. At this juncture I prefer agave syrup over either sugar or honey however I may find it's cost to be prohibitive. Best of luck with your experiment.
Don

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #358 on: February 19, 2012, 03:42:40 PM »
thanks Don, I will of course let everyone know how it turns out!   :P


Online norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #359 on: February 19, 2012, 03:46:57 PM »

CDNpielover,

I worked with baking powder and yeast when I worked on the “Sukie” pizza.  It is sure complicated for me to understand how to go about adding baking powder and yeast, but Peter came up with “goody bag” for me to add to Bisquick Biscuit mix at Reply #74 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13686.msg137842.html#msg137842  I did many experiments on that thread.  I haven’t worked with soda in any of my doughs though.

I never tried to make those pizzas on that thread in pan, but that might be interesting.

Good luck with your experiment.  :)

Norma

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #360 on: February 19, 2012, 11:06:33 PM »
I made a pie using Peter's Greek MA#1 formulation from above.  This is my first time making pizza in a pan like this.  The pie turned out well, but not nearly like the visions (of grandeur) that I had going into this haha!   :chef:

I baked at 500 F on a stone on the bottom rack for 7 minutes, and then moved it to the top rack for about 5 minutes more to encourage top browning.  The top looked fairly brown around the edges, but I was afraid that I was overcooking the bottom crust, so I took it out.  Unfortunately, I had WAY TOO MANY toppings, and the pie wasn't cooked as much as I thought it was.  The crust was cooked, but not really browned and certainly not fried.  Next time I am going to put on way less toppings (I've been good lately about being light on the toppings, but I guess I was deceived by the appearance of the pan haha)

Another problem I had was handling the hot pan - it's nearly impossible without one of those special gripper things!  A guy could burn his arm off if he slipped whilst trying to maneouver the heavy pie out of the oven using a slippery pot holder and doller store tongs.   :P

I applied the sauce and cheese to the edge, hoping for a nice carmelized edge.  These did caramelize well, however they just ended up sticking to the side of the pan and didn't make it out with the rest of the pizza.  Does anyone have any tips for avoiding that?  I did oil the pan with olive oil, however it sat for 2 hours while the dough was rising and I'm afraid it ran down the sides.  Next time I'll oil them again before dressing the pizza.

i'll put up some pics later tonight or tomorrow.   :chef:

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #361 on: February 24, 2012, 09:40:38 AM »
Ok, so I went ahead and made two dough balls with baking powder and club soda.
 
Flour(KABF)100%
Water        58
IDY           .2
Salt           2.1
Oil(olive)    4
Sugar        1.16
Baking Powder 2.32
Single Ball 289.46g (10 inch)

 Unscientifically, I adjusted the numbers in the calculator to more or less come out to even t-spoon type measurements. The water, I split 50/50 tap water and club soda. During the initial mix the dough seemed very dry so I added about 2 tablespoons of water.

The finished pizza was very good, but probably more for the toppings than the dough, which had a tight bread-like crumb. I'm not sure I could taste any difference the club soda and baking powder might have made. I should have made a normal "control" dough and doughs with one new ingredient at a time, to see how each one affected the dough.

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #362 on: February 24, 2012, 10:04:00 AM »
Oh, and I forgot to mention this pie was topped with a thin layer of regular pizza sauce, several dollops of Normas' home-made ricotta, mild white cheddar, sliced hot cappicola and sausage that was removed from it's casing and pre-fried. I think it was Premio brand from Wal-Mart. Pretty darn tasty if you ask me! :P

Online norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #363 on: February 24, 2012, 12:47:38 PM »
Steve,

That was a great tasting pie you made.  ;)  I thought the crumb and crust tasted different, but just couldn’t decide what it was.  Great job!  :chef:

Norma

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #364 on: February 24, 2012, 01:07:44 PM »
Thanks Norma,

 Some more details come to mind. This dough was cold fermented approx. 24 hrs. and room temp, pan proofed about 8 hrs, then baked in Normas deck oven about 8-10 minutes. I didn't actually time the bake. I think Normas' oven runs about 525 or so.
 Ok, I just now made a pie with dough ball #2, at home, in my electric kitchen oven at 500 for 10 minutes exactly. This dough was cold fermented 4 days and pan proofed maybe 2 hrs. Toppings were sauce and pepperoni under a combination of sharp white cheddar and mozz. 
 To be honest, I can't discern any difference whatsoever in the crust. Go figure. ???

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #365 on: March 31, 2012, 01:48:00 PM »
Here's another I made at Norma's market stand last week.
Garlic Alfredo sauce with sausage, spinach and a three cheese blend of White Cheddar, Yancy's Steakhouse Onion Cheddar and a little mozzarella.

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #366 on: March 31, 2012, 01:49:32 PM »
......and the crumb


Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #367 on: April 01, 2012, 03:27:18 PM »
^^looks awesome!  how do you keep the cheese from sticking to the sides of the pan.  I know the pan is oiled, but doesn't it run down the sides during the pan rise so the sides are essentially unoiled?

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #368 on: April 01, 2012, 05:44:06 PM »
Thanks.
Well, the pan is oiled initially, so I believe there is always a film of oil present. Plus, the cheddar is an oily cheese anyway, so there is some more lubrication built in. Mainly though, i think it's important to use a well seasoned pan.

parallei

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #369 on: April 01, 2012, 05:48:46 PM »
Those sure look tasty Ev.  I have a weakness for white pies!

Online norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #370 on: April 01, 2012, 06:12:42 PM »
Steve,

That Greek pizza with the unique toppings sure was tasty!  :chef:

Norma

Offline scott r

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #371 on: April 01, 2012, 11:42:30 PM »
Some of the shots on this  page look 100% spot on south shore boston.   Its fun coming back here to this thread to see what you guys have been up to.  Since I moved south of the city and am in greek bar pizza land, I keep finding more and more places than are using eggs and milk in the dough along with flour salt, sugar, and oil.  If anyone feels like experimenting, it does give a nice richness that when combined with the cheddar and slightly fried bottom really do make for an addictive pizza.  It changes the texture of the pizza and makes it a little more dense and crispy, taking on an interesting texture/flavor profile...almost like a soft warm cheeze-it.        
« Last Edit: April 01, 2012, 11:44:06 PM by scott r »

Online norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #372 on: April 02, 2012, 08:14:02 AM »
Scott,

Do you know what kind of formulation to try with eggs, milk, flour, salt, sugar, and oil?  I really like Greek pizzas and would like to experiment more.

Norma

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #373 on: April 02, 2012, 08:52:10 AM »
At one point, Peter came up with a formula using egg and milk, which I tried, but the amounts were so small that I don't think I could tell a difference. I only ever tried the one experiment. Perhaps I'll revisit the idea of eggs and milk in pizza dough.

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #374 on: April 02, 2012, 10:32:14 AM »
I also tried Pete's formulation with eggs, but it was a massive fail for a couple of other reasons.  I should give it another try soon, though.


 

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