Author Topic: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe  (Read 16479 times)

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Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #60 on: March 03, 2009, 10:33:58 AM »
Good Day Pete
I hope all is well

This is a continuation of the last post http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7997.0.html whereby I mentioned that I would like to do some more experimentation with the LC type recipe as I found it quite close to what I was initially looking for when I came to this forum

Use of VWG and Semolina definitely does produces a different type of chewiness.
I found that the type of chewiness Semolina produced was very close to what I was looking for.
There are however a few changes I would like to make to produce something more to my preference.
Now when I look back and reminisce on how you mentioned that trying to clone a pizza would require the right brands, nutrition data and correct ingredients list. This make so much on sense right now since my Pan Pizza has evolved a lot from what I initially started out with to what it has become now and that is all thank to you PETE.

Anyways Here goes.

1) A longer Cold fermentation to bring out more flavor in the crust. The last attempt of the LC was left for 1 day but I bet that a 3 day Cold Fermentation would produce exceptional results.

2) I would like to use butter instead of oil in the Dough Making Process. I just have this sudden urge to taste a pizza that has a buttery flavor to it. I would also like to use butter on the base just before baking. I believe that LC does this together with Parmesan cheese.

3) I would like to achieve a slightly more airy crust with the type of chew produced in my last LC Attempt

4) I would like to also fry the crust. So basically the pizza with be placed in a pan that will have oil in it similar to how Pizza Hut bakes they pizza.

Looking forward to to your comments. I cant wait for my next attempt.

I think that should suffice for now.
I should know after this attempt what more could be done to perfect this pizza.
By the way I am actually heading away from the local pizzeria in my area and trying to produce a more unique and personal type of pizza with my own personal preference.


Regards
PizzaManic
« Last Edit: March 03, 2009, 10:36:49 AM by PizzaManic »


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #61 on: March 03, 2009, 11:03:46 AM »
PizzaManic,

For some reason, your link did not take. But, for convenience, it is http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7997.msg68791.html#msg68791.

My advice to you at this point is to just keep experimenting with the dough formulations. If you want to retain the chew characteristic, and don't have access to a naturally high-protein flour, I would stick with the semolina for now, especially if you if you are not all that keen on the VWG. To get a more open and airy crumb, I would try increasing the hydration a few percent, commensurate with the absorption characteristics of your flour blend, and I would try decreasing the amount of oil and sugar to reduce the tenderness and softness of the crumb to open up the cell structure. You might try reducing both by half as a starting point and be prepared to lower their values even more if you don't get a sufficient opening up of the crumb.

I don't think that I would try using butter for now. Maybe that is something you can try in a side experiment or postone until later.

As far as a longer fermentation time is concerned, the last LC dough formulation you used called for 0.93% IDY. That is a lot for a 3-day fermentation and may result in overfermentation of the dough and degradation of its physical structure and handling qualities. You can try it to see for yourself, and if it overferments be prepared to lower the amount of IDY in the next iteration. I believe it is still fairly warm in South Africa (a predicted high of close to 26 degrees C in Johannesburg today), so I would look at something like 0.30-0.35% IDY for a 3-day cold fermentation.

Peter

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #62 on: March 04, 2009, 02:30:59 AM »
Hi Pete
Thanks for the response.

I would like to firstly correct myself. In my last post I mentioned that
Quote
I found that the type of chewiness Semolina produced was very close to what I was looking for
. In error, I had forgotten to continue that sentence. So what I did mean to say was that I found the type of chewiness Semolina produced was very close to what I was looking for BUT the type of chewiness that the VWG produced was spot on  to what I was looking for so VWG would be route I would be using from now on.

Based upon the advice you gave me in your previous post, I came up with the following dough formulation.

Flour (100%):
Water (63%):
IDY (0.35%):
Salt (1.9%):
Oil (1.6%):
Sugar (2.65%):
Total (169.5%):
145.2 g  |  5.12 oz | 0.32 lbs
91.48 g  |  3.23 oz | 0.2 lbs
0.51 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.17 tsp | 0.06 tbsp
2.76 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.49 tsp | 0.16 tbsp
2.32 g | 0.08 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.52 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
3.85 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.97 tsp | 0.32 tbsp
246.11 g | 8.68 oz | 0.54 lbs | TF = 0.128905
** The flour/VWG blend would be 139.4654 g Flour + 5.7346 g VWG (2.29 tsp)

The current temperature where I live is +- 28 Degrees Celsius.

With regards to the butter, if I would like to implement it How would I go about doing so? Should I just do go ahead and remove oil from my formulation and substitute it with butter. I also forgot to mention that that on my last LC attempt I Pre-Baked the crust for +- 3 minutes on 220 Degrees C. I was thinking of maybe trying a little variation by brushing the top of the pizza with butter, Pre-Bake it for +- 3 minutes and then upon removing it from the oven, add all my toppings and send it in for a final bake. What I need to know is whether Pre-Baking the crust would produce a more airy pizza which I am currently trying to achieve?

Also on my next attempt, I would like to make the dough, and immediately roll it and then place it my pan which will then lie in the fridge for the 3 day cold fermentation contra to what I did on my last attempt whereby the dough was first allowed to cold ferment and then placed into its pan and then allowed to proof for about an hour before baking.

With regards to the decrease in the oil amount, I was wondering whether I should use any special method when making the dough. The reason I ask this is because I find dough that has a small amount of oil harder to mix than dough with greater amounts of oil.

I really loved the Rim you created in your attempt of the LC type pizza found here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=1515.0;attach=5136 . Any advice on how I can also replicate something like that.

Lastly I will be using a stand mixer so the mixing method shouldn't be too much of a headache and better yet a disaster. For the 3 day fermentation, I would need to achieve the correct dough temp. What temp would you suggest my final dough need to be. Also since I will be using a stand mixer could you show me how to calculate what water temperature I would need, to achieve the desired dough temp.

Thanks again for all the assistance

Regards
PizzaManic

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #63 on: March 04, 2009, 08:35:08 AM »
Pizza Manic,

If you decide that you would like to use butter instead of oil, you can just substitute butter (you might use unsalted so as not to add more salt to the pizza) for the oil, using the same baker's percent. If you pre-bake the skin, you can also brush it with butter if you'd like. In theory, pre-baking the skin without sauce, cheese and toppings on it, and assuming modest hydration levels, should result in a greater height for the finished crust because there is no weight on the skin to restrain it from expansion. With respect to the rim of the pizza that I described at Reply 73 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1515.msg33473.html#msg33473, I would say that the combination of the large amount of yeast in the dough (nominally 0.93% IDY) at the time of the bake (after about 27 hours of fermentation) and the 40 minutes of tempering (proofing) of the dough before dressing and baking were responsible for the size of the rim. If a longer fermentation period is used, the yeast levels may be less but the proofing of the dough skin should help with final crust height. You will have to experiment with yeast levels and fermentation and proof times to get the optimum rim size for your purposes.

If you reduce the oil in the dough formulation, you should be able to add the oil to the water in your mixer bowl. You should also be able to pan the dough before refrigerating. That is essentially the method that Pizza Hut used for their pan pizzas before they went to frozen doughs in the U.S., although they may still be using that method outside of the U.S. in those countries (like the Philippines) where they still use fresh dough.

To calculate the water temperature to use in your case, you may want to use the method described in this document from General Mills: http://www.gmflour.com/gmflour/PDFs/Website%20A49104%20Just%20Crust%20Brochure.pdf. It isn't the most exact method but I believe it should be adequate for your purposes so long as you don't dilly dally in making your dough and you get the dough into the refrigerator promptly after making. You may even find that the little table in the GM document at page 6 will work in your case (although you will have to convert it to Celsius). However, since you are using a standard home refrigerator instead of a commercial cooler to cool your dough, you may want to shoot for a finished dough temperature of around 75 degrees F (24 degrees C) instead of 80 degrees F (27 degrees C). You may find that you will have to tweak water temperature to compensate for the fact that your mixer is likely to have a different bowl friction factor than used in the GM example and in the chart. If you want to read more on this topic, including how to calculate the friction factor for your particular mixer and dough batch size, see this article: http://www.pmq.com/mag/2003spring/tom_lehmann.shtml. Note also the tips at the bottom of that article.

Peter

EDIT (2/4/2013): For an alternative link to the Lehmann article, see http://web.archive.org/web/20090728230927/http://www.pmq.com/mag/2003spring/tom_lehmann.shtml; for a corrected link to the General Mills article, see http://www.professionalbakingsolutions.com/water-temperature-chart
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 02:55:01 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #64 on: March 11, 2009, 08:27:34 AM »
Hi Pete
I recently took another stab at this one using the forumla in the following post http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6984.msg69723.html#msg69723 .

The method was as follows.

1) I started out by Adding Salt + Sugar and dissolved it in water. Water temp was +- 43 Degrees F.

2) I then added in the oil to water

3) Lastly I mixed together the Flour + VWG + IDY in a separate bowl and added it a Table Spoon at a time to the water mixture while the machine was on stir speed 1 using the beater attachment.

4) It didn't take longer than 2 minutes before the dough was pulled away from the sides of the bowl

5) I quickly scraped away dough from the beater attachment, Removed the beater attachment of the machine and also one more note is that about 10% of the dough was stuck to the bottom of the mixer bowl so I simply scraped it using a spatula and incorporated it into the dough ball with my hands. You can basically say that I hand kneaded all the bits and scraps of dough into the 1 large dough ball for not longer than 15 seconds.

6) After attaching the dough hooks, i kneaded on speed 2 for approx 4.5 minutes stopping at alternate times to feel the dough to see whether it lost its stickiness. Basically once the knead process was complete, I was left with a smooth, cohesive, slightly tacky dough ball.

7) The dough temp at this stage was 81.3 Degrees F, a bit of from the target temp of 75 Degrees F.

8) I quickly rolled out the dough to my desired size, which I then placed in my oiled pan which was then places inside of a plastic packet and pushed into the fridge.
NB: One think I must mention at this stage was the fact that I didn't manage to roll out the dough from edge to edge of the pan. The oil in my pan was too much and kept coming up the sides of the pan and onto the top part of the dough. This kept hindering my stretching abilities to successfully make the dough meet the ends of the pan. So u could say that half the dough touched the edge of the pan while the other half of the dough was about 0.5CM away from the edge.

9) After 53 HRS in the fridge it was taken out, left at room temp for not longer than 10 minutes (Sorry, but I was very hungry and couldn't wait) and pushed into my oven. The rack was one notch up from the most bottom part of my oven +-15 cm from the element. The oven had my stone inside which was pre-heated on 240 Degrees Celsius for about 1 Hour and 10 minutes before I lowered the temp to 220 Degrees C.

10) The dough pre-baked for about 3.5 Minutes. Now there was some major differences this time compared to all my other attempts. Almost the entire center of my pie bubbled up. You could say like 40% of the pie created one huge bubble.

11) After topping my pizza, it was placed back into the oven for a final bake. The bake time was approx 8 Minutes on 220 Degrees Celsius. In both instances the pan was placed on my stone.


I have to say that overall I was overly impressed with the outcome of the pizza. The crust was extremely crispy on the underneath but soft, chewy and airy on the inside.One note is that the top of the pizza was slightly under baked. Would I need to use my broiler on the next attempt or would I need to move the pizza to a top rack at around 6 minutes.

Also with regards to the bubble, that part of the pizza had no crisp at all. In fact it was as if that part of the pizza did not touch the pan at all. What could have caused this.

The major difference which I particularly enjoyed from my last LC attemp to this modified  LC attemp was 2 fold.
One was the fried crust caused by oil in the pan
The second one was the overly long cold fermentation really created a tasty crust.

What I didn't manage to achieve in this attempt which was achieved in my LC attempt was as follows.
 1) The LC attempt created a slightly thicker pizza than this attempt. I did notice that this time's pizza was not very thick and it didn't seem like it rose much. If I were to put that into a percentage, Just based on sight, I would say that this attempt rose by 50% whereas the LC pizza rose by 75%.

I think that rolling the pizza and placing it in the pan for a 45 Min proof is better than what I did on this attempt.

Lastly, I didn't use the butter in this recipe, however I was thinking of trying a slight variation. I would like to use the butter in the pan instead of the oil. Will this work and crisp the underneath like how the oil does?

Please advise on the points mentioned above and how I can improve on it correct any problems mentioned above.
Honestly, since my very first attempt at this, I have come a long way and that's all thanks to you PETE.
You are truly a great guy. Again a big thanks from me.

Regards
PizzaManic

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #65 on: March 11, 2009, 10:56:55 AM »
Pizza Manic,

My first piece of advice is for you to have a small snack the next time you decide to make this pizza--to quell your primal urges to eat pizza--and let the dough warm up properly before baking. I tell you this because the number one cause for crust bubbling in the oven is baking the dough while it is cold. It will lead to a case of premature pizzajaculation. If you take prophylactic measures next time, I think you will find that the underbaking problem will go away.

With respect to your question on the use of butter in the pan, I refer you to a couple of posts by Tom Lehmann at the PMQ Think Tank at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=6662#6662 and http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=14224#14224. As you can see, some experimentation is perhaps in order.

When can we expect to see some photos of your end results?

Peter


Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #66 on: March 12, 2009, 03:16:16 AM »
Hey Pete

I like your tip. I will definitely keep that in mind next time round and eat something before making this again. To be quite honest, when I switched on my oven to pre-heat it, I forgot to take out the pizza at that time. Had I done that, it would have warmed up at room temp perfectly.

I think my pizza became overly aroused for it to PizzaJaculate. LOL. I have to say that I like the way you used that word in just the right context. You learn something new everyday. On  a more serious note, I would just like to mention to others reading this post that we and myself included tend to think we have everything under control because we do certain things so often. Like for E.G with this Pan Pizza, I have done it so many times that the smallest of things like warming it up at room temp just passed me by like the wind. Its just a note to others to follow each and every step to perfect the end results. That's the reason I personally like to report back my results in much detail and very sure that PETE would catch my error for me to correct it next time.

So If I understand this correctly, the reason for the under baking was because I didn't let the dough warm up. I'll definitely correct that on my next attempt.

I am reading the post on the butter this very moment. Will keep you informed on my outcome.

As for the Pictures, I knew this would come up some time or the other.
Unfortunately I don't have a good digital camera. The camera I have is on my cellphone and the picture quality is absolutely terrible but I am going to try and get my hands on one specially for you guys here. I need to show you guys my progress and all you'll s hard work. It's well overdue.

Take Care
Regards
PizzaManic

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #67 on: November 19, 2012, 01:18:21 PM »
Hello to my good friends at PizzaMaking and a special greeting to Pete-ezza.
Its been a while - a long long while since I've posted here.

On a lighter note, NO :P I haven't given up my Pizza Making adventures. On the contrary, I've entered a whole new world of Pizza Making.

I was always intrigued by Wood Fired Pizza ovens and I guess it was something i pictured my self standing in front of one loading and unloading pies like the pro's but little did I know that one day I would actually be doing this.

2 years ago, I came across the Pizza Raquel thread by PFTaylor and after reading through it saw a new challenge, one that I thought would take me a few weeks at most but little did I know I would be spending a lot more time than that.
With a change in course, I started out this new adventure not knowing what to expect, I have never ever touched cement in my life, how would I build this from scratch but I was determined and so the work began. During the journey, I encountered various challenges, some so daunting that I was on the brink of giving up but I just pushed myself and kept going until 2 years later I finally saw the fruits of all my hard work bearing. Well, the oven is at 90% completion, but to be honest I'm a little impatient and will be loading in my first pie this weekend - touch wood ... Uhmmm I mean burn wood ;D

With this challenge on my hands, my weekends were jam packed with Mixing Cement and Cutting bricks - I just couldn't find time for pizza making - hmmm honestly i think my subconscious mind kept saying No Pizza I make will be good unless it's made in my Oven To Be ... hehehe.

Never the less - I'm back and back with more enthusiasm than ever.
I'm planning to fire up this weekend and cook a few pies in there but I can't forget my roots and where all this started and the reason why I started making Pizza's so I decided I have to make my Pan Pizza as well. I remember posting in another thread about my last attempt at this pizza and the good results I achieved from it but I couldn't remember what further modifications I wanted to do so I decided to just try that same recipe again and work from there.

Just for a refresher, the recipe I wish to use is as follows.
9.26 Inch Pan

Flour (100%):
Water (59.6%):
IDY (0.93%):
Salt (01.86%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (3.11%):
Sugar (5.28%):
Total (170.78%):
144.11 g  |  5.08 oz | 0.32 lbs
85.89 g  |  3.03 oz | 0.19 lbs
1.34 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.44 tsp | 0.15 tbsp
2.68 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.48 tsp | 0.16 tbsp
4.48 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.99 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
7.61 g | 0.27 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.91 tsp | 0.64 tbsp
246.11 g | 8.68 oz | 0.54 lbs | TF = 0.128905
** The flour/VWG blend would be 138.4185 g Flour + 5.6915 g VWG (2.27 tsp)
Sorry for the bad formatting, I'm responding from my mobile.

I will also be attempting Pizza Raquel and will start a new thread to document my progress. Pete, I need some help formulating a dough to cater for a smaller size pizza.

Thanks
Regards
PM

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #68 on: November 22, 2012, 10:21:09 AM »
Hi Pete

I completely forgot where i had left off with this experiment but i know I had some excellent results with my last attempt. I have one bad habit though, I write the results on scraps of paper which i don't end up filing chronologically and eventually i don't know where they end up.

Thankfully, after every attempt, I posted back my results and could easily find my last attempt just before i had took a short break from the Forum to pursue my Oven Building.

The last formula i used was from this post http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6984.msg69723.html#msg69723 and results of that attempt was in this post http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6984.msg70197.html#msg70197
Slowly, memories started flowing back and i remember this last attempt was very good except that i found the pizza was a little "thinner (For the lack of a better word)" compared to the attempt i tried here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7997.msg68791.html#msg68791
I notice the major difference between the 2 formulas was my last attempt used 0.35% IDY compared to using 0.93% here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7997.msg68791.html#msg68791 .

I'm planning to make this on the weekend in conjunction with the Raquel and was wondering do i up the IDY to cater for a slightly thicker pizza? I remember mentioning in the post where i used 0.93% IDY that the pizza was slightly airy which meant my last attempt was more airy so i don't want to up the IDY too much that it adversely affects the airiness of the crust.

Sorry, this post is a little confusing since I'm referring to a lot of previous posts but I'm trying to find my feet where i left of last.

Look forward to hearing from you.
Regards
PM

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #69 on: November 22, 2012, 08:15:17 PM »
PM,

Yes, you have confused me. This thread is over four years old and there were many different recipes discussed with many twists and turns. I would have to devote a good part of a day to reread the thread and refamiliarize myself with its details. Maybe you can tell me which recipe you want to use and how you would like to modify it and for what purpose. Also, do you plan to use your new oven to bake the pizzas made with the modified recipe?

Peter


Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #70 on: November 23, 2012, 01:54:39 AM »
Hi Pete

The last time I made Pan Pizza, i used the formula in this post http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6984.msg69723.html#msg69723 and the method and end result can be found here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6984.msg70197.html#msg70197 . I was very happy with this attempt and i would like to use the same formula except that I'd like to increase the "height of the crust" if that makes any sense. I found the pizza to be a bit "flatter" or "thinner" than previous attempts but it had everything else from great taste to the right texture, chewiness, crispy underneath and soft and tender on the inside.

I was thinking, should I increase the IDY from -0.35% to 0.5%? or whatever other recommendations you have

I won't be using the new oven as I have read that Pan Pizza could be a challenge baking in very high heat so for now i will stick with my conventional oven until i perfect the recipe then later I can look at how to adapt it for the new oven.

Thanks
Regards
PM

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #71 on: November 23, 2012, 09:44:35 AM »
PM,

As I see it, there are a few possibilities to achieve the results you are after. You can increase the amount of yeast, as you indicated, or you can use a longer temper period before pre-baking. You can also use a warmer temperature to temper/proof the dough, for example, by placing the dough in its pan into an oven with the light on. Or you can use a combination of one or more of the above measures. If you are eventually able to achieve the results you are after, you may have to rethink the possibility of using your new wood-fired oven to bake the pan pizzas, especially if the temperature is in excess of around 500 degrees F (260 degrees C). The reason is that the sugar in the dough can lead to excessive bottom crust browning or even burning. You may also find that your flour, if it is malted, may not be the best suited flour for your oven, especially if your oven delivers very high temperatures (e.g., above 700 degrees F, or about 370 degrees C).

I don't want to distract you from goal, but after rereading what you were hoping to achieve in your opening post in this thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6984.msg59970.html#msg59970, you might find it helpful to take a look at the following threads:

1) http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3783.msg31493.html#msg31493 (Detroit Style);

2) http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,21559.msg217567.html#msg217567 (Detroit Style);

3) http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,22076.msg224230.html#msg224230 (Detroit Style in a WFO);

4) http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg6229.html#msg6229 (Greek Style).

The Detroit style pizzas are typically baked in rectangular steel pans and are based on the Sicilian style of pizza. The Goodfella's pizzas you were trying to emulate also made claims about being "Italian" in origin. There is no reason why a Detroit style pizza cannot be made round rather than rectangular, as Norma proved in the second thread referenced above. The third thread referenced above shows that a Detroit style pizza can be baked in a WFO.

The Greek style pizza is almost always made round and they are typically baked in steel pans. It is more like the PH pan pizza in terms of style but with different cheeses.

Threads 1), 2) and 4) are quite long, having evolved over long periods of time in most cases, but if you scan the threads and concentrate on the photos, I think you should be able to tell if they depict what you are looking for. If so, you can then dig deeper into the details.

Peter



Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #72 on: November 23, 2012, 10:28:40 AM »
Hi Pete

Thanks for the valuable info. I'm gonna dig into the threads and see if I can find what I'm looking for.
For now, I'm gona push the IDY up to 0.5% and see what happens.

I'm really excited that you mention about using the WFO for Pan Pizza. I'm intrigured to give that a try some time soon.

Will keep you posted.
Thanks
PM

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #73 on: November 24, 2012, 04:00:58 PM »
  Hi Pete

My plans to make the dough yesterday didn't quite happen and I ended up doing it today at 4PM. Below is the forumla I used as well as the method.

Flour (100%): 290.14 g  |  10.23 oz | 0.64 lbs
Water (63%): 182.79 g  |  6.45 oz | 0.4 lbs
IDY (0.5%): 1.45 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.48 tsp | 0.16 tbsp
Salt (1.9%): 5.51 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.99 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (1.6%): 4.64 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.02 tsp | 0.34 tbsp
Sugar (2.65%): 7.69 g | 0.27 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.93 tsp | 0.64 tbsp
Total (169.65%):492.23 g | 17.36 oz | 1.09 lbs | TF = 0.128905
Single Ball:246.11 g | 8.68 oz | 0.54 lbs
*** 11.018Grams VWG (4.407tsp) + 279.122 Flour to push flower proteing to 14.2.

1) Measured out all ingredients and kept seperately except the VWG + Flour which was combined.
2) Mixed salt and sugar in ice cold water to dissolve.
3) Stirred oil into water mixture above
4) Lastly I switched on my machine with beater attachment on lowest speed and added flour tablespoon at a time till all was added.
5) In a little while about 2 or 3 minutes, the dough collected in 1 ball and pulled away from the sides of the bowl.
6) Machine was stopped, dough stuck to beater attachment was incorporated into large dough ball found in bowl using a hand kneading fashion for about 30 seconds.
7) Dough hooks attached to machine and switched on to speed no. 2 for approx. 5 minutes alternatlvely stopping to check if dough lost it's stickyness and is soft and tacky.
8) Dough ball was hand kneaded for about a minute or 2 then seperated into 2 dough balls. I more or less got them slit exactly in half but had to pinch a piece here and there to get the right weight.
9) Dough balls placed in a tray that was oiled at the bottom and then dough balls were oiled at the tops and sides and sent straight into the fridge.

Now if you noticed, I didn't mention anything about IDY in the method and that was purposely done because I didn't add any  ???
The IDY was measured out and got hidden underneath some of my utensils. Only when I was cleaning up then I realized my silly mistake :o
I quickly ran to the fridge, grabbed the 2 dough balls, kneaded them together, got the 1 big ball into my dough mixer with hooks and kneaded a little whilst adding the IDY as the dough was kneading. Once all the IDY was added, dough was kneaded for about 2 minutes, total knead time was 3 minutes from when I started the machine. Thankfully the dough was still soft and tacky. I added back to the container, reoiled the top of skin and put in freezer.

I just checked the dough now, 5 hrs later and its flattened out and spread. Never the less, I don't know what to expect after this mess up I made - hope it all works out.

Thanks
PM
 


Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #74 on: November 25, 2012, 12:30:18 PM »
Hi Pete
I was ready to use my dough today and didn't know what to expect.

I had to contend to few more unforeseen circumstances. We had an electricity cut at 1AM this morning and hence the fridge was out till 11AM. The fridge was still cool but not at its optimal temp.

Never the less I got to my dough at about 1PM and pulled it out the fridge and left at room temp for about an hour. The dough was extremely soft and sticky but I managed to get it onto my floured surface and began to stretch out the first skin. It just wasn't streching easily and kept springing back but then I just kept going at it until the centre of my dough was quite thin and then had 2 small holes. I tried to pinch the dough together and eventually managed to stretch the dough from end to end of the pan. I did the same for the second dough but this time used a rolling pin which made things much easier, I got the dough to the desired size and put it into my pan. Both my pans were laced with oil enough to cover the bottom. Both pizza's were left for 1 hour to proof as it was very low and didn't puff up and fill the pan. After the 1hr rise, the dough was still quite low and not that puffy but never the less I had hungry vultures waiting so I put it into my 220C oven and baked for 10 minutes on 2nd last rack from the bottom. Thankfully, it started to puff up as it bake and after 10 mins I removed and served. It wasn't bad at all considering I forgot the yeast. It was soft and chewy although lacked some airyness.

Everyone enjoyed it so that was a big thumbs up for me but I can improve further, I'm sure of that. I'm still looking through the threads you gave me to see if I can find that perfect looking pizza but for now any advice is welcome.

There's 1 thing I have to do from my side. Until I perfect the dough and base, I aint going to top the pizza with anything, just going to bake it plain and when its baked going to top it with garlic butter just for a little flavour but my objective is to get the base perfect then I'll work on the sauce, cheese and toppings later.

I noticed 1 thing in my crumb compared to others I've seen, mine lacks the snow white colour on the inside, its a more creamish brownish looking - it think that's just a visual effect but something I'd like to achieve.

Sorry couldn't get any pics, invited over some guests at the last minute and when I went to grab my camera, there wasn't any pizza to take a pic of :)

Thanks
Regards
PM
« Last Edit: November 25, 2012, 12:32:45 PM by PizzaManic »

Offline PizzaManic

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  • Posts: 125
Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #75 on: January 20, 2014, 10:35:09 AM »
Hello to All my Good Friends
I trust all are well and the very best for 2014.

It's been a while since posting here but I've had so many Life Changing events go on over the last 2 years that I really don't know where the time has lapsed to, none the less, good news is I haven't abandoned my pizza making adventures - I'm always looking through the forum and get motivated by other users success - Oh! And the pictures just make you crave more and more pizza.

So, the reason for my post is to celebrate my success at long last. When I first joined this forum, my goal was to produce a Deep Pan Pizza like Pizza Hut. In the beginning we encountered a lot of challenges - mainly the availability of ingredients here in SA amongst many others. I want to take this opportunity to thanks Pete-zza for his perseverance and patience during my learning phase - I would pester him with the most obnoxious questions and he would always provide me with the best solutions in the most humble of ways, so really without him and many others on this forum, I don't think I would have got to the stage in Pizza Making where I am today.

For my most recent attempts, I used the formulation in the 2nd last post of this thread and the end result was pure bliss - absolutely light interior of the crust, crispy and fried underneath - melt in your mouth sensation - every characteristic I was looking for was met in the pizza. I have up to date made this pizza 3 times and all 3 times have been consistent - now I know for sure that I have perfected the Deep Pan Pizza to my liking and felt it’s time to share the good news with you all.

On my last attempt, I invited guests over and part of that guest list was a critic of note - I love having him over because he is very thorough in his criticism and doesn’t leave any stone unturned. Whilst he was over, I was busy topping the pizza and as he watched me do so, he began to criticise whatever little he could see me doing. Once the pizza was popped into the oven, he popped by the kitchen again and gave me some pointers about when is the right time to remove the pizza and so on.... None the less, I timed my pizza to how I normally make it and then not long after I served it. He quickly grabbed a slice and as he took the first bite he became totally silent - all he could say was MMMmmmmm, your pizza is nice. As he took the 2nd slice, he said the crust is soooo crispy and he gulped it down. Everyone else demolished the pizza but the most heartfelt comment came from my Mum who said - I just love your pizza.

Photo’s was never my strong point purely because I never owned a decent camera but recently I got myself an Samsung S4 with a nice 13MP HD Camera. I also have timing issues with the Photo’s and generally the pizza is gone before I ever get a chance to grab a few shots but this time I made damn sure (especially to put it up here on the forum) I grabbed some shots so you all can see the end result of all the hard work you guys put into getting me to this point in my Pizza Making Adventures.

Along the way, I discovered so much about Pizza's that one goal now turned into many more different goals so I guess Pizza Making is going to be a part of my life and it's a continuous learning experience which I am already enjoying very much.

Until my next thread on my next style of pizza (which I hope to start soon) - take care.
Regards
PM
« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 10:37:18 AM by PizzaManic »