Author Topic: Olive Oil  (Read 2569 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline humpty99

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 30
Olive Oil
« on: November 12, 2008, 01:07:32 PM »
I am thinking of springing for a nice bottle of $40.00-$50.00 olive oil.  There are so many to pick from.  Any suggestions?


Offline Art

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 225
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hoschton, GA
  • la pizza la mia vita!!
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2008, 02:00:30 PM »
If you have a Williams-Sonoma store near you, this is the one I use.  Art
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/sku3809464/index.cfm
When baking, follow directions.  When cooking, go by your own taste.

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22026
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2008, 02:20:15 PM »
humpty99,

What do you plan to use the oil for?

Peter

Offline Bill/SFNM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4040
  • Location: Santa Fe, NM
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2008, 02:28:31 PM »
For the past few years, I have splurged every December as a Christmas present to myself for the unparalleled Tuscan "Olio Nuovo" imported by Howard Case (Cristophe, formerly of A16 turned me on to Howard). Given the current economic situation (which seems headed into even darker territory), I'll not be ordering this year. I've got to say that Wild Oats sells a great house-brand Extra Virgin Oil for a fraction of the price. Now that Wild Oats has merged with Whole Foods, I wonder how long they will produce this great, general purpose olive oil.

Also, I'm not using much olive oil on pizzas these days.


Online jeff v

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1456
  • Location: Orland Park, IL
  • I'm Valentino not Varasano :)
    • Pizzeria Valentino
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2008, 04:43:56 PM »


Also, I'm not using much olive oil on pizzas these days.



Care to expand on that?

Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Offline Bill/SFNM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4040
  • Location: Santa Fe, NM
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2008, 05:14:09 PM »
Care to expand on that?

I guess I'm going through a phase where the taste of an excellent olive oil drizzled on a hot pie doesn't have as much appeal for me as it used to. The taste of the crust is, of course, foremost. Then the toppings, like the richness of the cheese contrasting with the acidity of the tomatoes and the aroma of the basil - there doesn't seem to be the need for anything else. Well, not entirely. Lately I've really taken to some garlicky shrimp under the cheese.

As I said, possibly just a phase I'm going through. Toppings may come and go, but the the crust remains my obsession. Capiche?

Bill/SFNM


 

Online jeff v

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1456
  • Location: Orland Park, IL
  • I'm Valentino not Varasano :)
    • Pizzeria Valentino
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2008, 09:53:06 PM »
Bonus points for using "capiche" so well-nice one.

I'm envious of the stage your at right now, you have a zen pizza thing going. Probably because I'm in a phase where it's wolf wolf...what did I eat? It was good right? Bad time for a food enthusiast. :'(

Sorry to hijack your thread humpty99,

Jeff
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Offline BTB

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 972
  • Location: Tampa Bay, FL & S.W. Mich. areas
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2008, 11:10:08 AM »

Also, I'm not using much olive oil on pizzas these days.

One report I've seen on American Test Kitchen seems to indicate that almost all olive oils shipped to and sold in the U.S. is virtually tasteless and low grade olive oil.  Some say they ship the low grade stuff to America because Americans really don't appreciate good olive oil.  I don't know if that's true but if the oil isn't as tasty as it once was, there's good reason not to use or emphasize much use anymore.

Offline apizza

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 405
  • Location: Wethersfield, CT
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2008, 07:10:58 PM »
On the topic of olive oil, this is the first in a series of stories in CT about olive oil.
http://www.courant.com/business/hc-oliveoil1121.artnov21,0,422097.story

The story is still going on and the state is investigating. Are we the only state with a problem? I doubt it.

Offline tdeane

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 521
  • Age: 42
  • Location: British Columbia, Canada
    • Pizzeria Barbarella
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2008, 12:49:43 AM »
I think Peter asked the most important question. What are you using it for? I honestly think Berrio or Colavita are good enough for most purposes. I am using Berrio extra virgin and regular olive oils in my pizzeria because I think it is the best of the less expensive, readily available oils. Colavita would be a close second for me. When I want a better bottle I usually go for Frantoia Barbara or Novelli di Macina. I really don't think you need to spend 40-50 dollars. $20-25 should get you a great bottle of olive oil, but again, what are you going to use it for.


Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22026
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2008, 08:28:00 AM »
Most people tend to associate using a high quality olive oil with Neapolitan pizzas. However, as noted in Reply 24 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,656.msg11520/topicseen.html#msg11520, what is generally far less known is that the Neapolitan pizza operators do not routinely top their pizzas with olive oil, but rather with seed oils or even soybean (soya) oil (of course, no oil is used in the dough itself). All of these oils are safe to use to top pizzas because the short bake time of about a minute or two won't materially degrade the oils and alter their taste or other characteristics. However, in my oven, the typical bake time is much longer and more likely to degrade a high quality olive oil. Consequently, I am more likely to use a lesser quality olive oil to top my pizzas, like the Bertolli Classico brand of olive oil. In my case, for some time now, I have been using soybean oil (vegetable oil) in my doughs rather than olive oil (although I sometimes use the Classico oil in the dough).

If I were a pizza operator wanting to use olive oil in the dough itself, I perhaps would use a pomace oil. I once suggested pomace oil to a member who was also a pizza operator. He had been using extra virgin olive oil. He made the switch to pomace oil and said he (and apparently his customers) couldn't tell the difference. The pomace oil was also quite a bit cheaper than the higher quality olive oils. A blend of olive oil and canola oil, such as a 80% olive oil and 20% canola oil blend is also a reasonable choice, and a less expensive one at that when compared with most olive oils. My own view as a home pizza maker is that the very best olive oils, which are usually expensive, should be reserved for uses other than for pizza.

Peter

Offline shango

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 344
  • Age: 41
  • Location: right here
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2008, 08:41:09 AM »
Academia Barilla makes some nice olive oils. 

http://www.academiabarilla.com/prodotti/iprodotti/oli/index.htm

http://www.shop.academiabarilla.com/index.php/eshop/category/Academia-Barilla-Regional-Olive-Oils.html?a=/1/frmCatID/525/

I have used the 100% Italiano professionally and find that it is perfect for pizza not to overpowering.  The Riviera Ligure is a much stronger oil and well suited for dressing burratta or antipasti...

skip the seed oil..
pizza, pizza, pizza

Offline mmarston

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 534
  • Location: Altamont, NY (Albany)
  • I can stop eating Pizza any time I want!
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2008, 10:28:51 AM »
I like Zoe, a high quality Spanish oil that is a great value. Good for everyday use.
Nobody cares if you can't dance well.  Just get up and dance.  Dave Barry

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22026
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Olive Oil
« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2009, 11:00:33 PM »
Recently, at the PMQ Think Tank, Tom Lehmann posted the following reply in response to a poster who asked about replacing a vegetable/olive oil blend with a pure or extra virgin olive oil (http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=42208#42208):

As you know, the 100% olive oil will cost more. The impact in flavor won't be as dramatic though. My own personal thoughts are that an extra virg. olive oil is wasted in making pizzas, instead opt for a Pomace Oil, it is a bit lower in cost, and stronger, more robust, in flavor making it ideally suited for use in a baking application such as in the dough or sauce. If you will be using the olive oil as a dipping oil, or adding it to the hot, fresh baked pizza, my suggestion in this application is to go with the extra virg. grade olive oil. Also, if you want to brush olive oil on the edge of the crust after baking, or apply it to an order of breadsticks, just before sprinkling on the powdered Parmesan Cheese, I'd go with an extra virg. oil for these applications too. I like to have both types on hand. In most cases you won't need to make any changes in the amount of oil used when making the switch, but in cases where a higher oil level is used (above 3%) , you may find that you will need to reduce the amount of Pomace oil used in the dough as opposed to the blended oil.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


Peter