Author Topic: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe  (Read 3231 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DenaliPete

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 258
DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« on: November 19, 2008, 07:43:11 PM »
Hi folks,

I've been lurking these forums for quite awhile and feel I've become a better overall cook by reading and applying many of the things I've read on these forums.  I feel it only right that I contribute in my own way.  I've got one more final on Friday and need the break from studying.

I think we've all been in a spot where either we just want pizza tonight (ie, we didn't think ahead to make dough a day or two before) or we found out that we'll be having some last minute guests tonight.

I don't know if anyone already has their emergency dough recipe stored in their head, but this is the one that I currently employ.  Its actually a spin-off from my mother's french bread recipe.

I will forewarn everyone though; if you're not a fan of JerryMac's  NY style recipe (ie, forget alot of the measurements, go by the feel) then you may want to skip this for a few days.  The next time I make the dough I'll actually measure out the additional flour that I end up needing to apply, but I will try and get some measurements for those out in the coming days.


To begin with:

2 cups flour (by volume)
2 tablespoons yeast - I know its alot, but this is a quick pizza
1 tablespoon sugar
3/4 tablespoon kosher salt
2 1/2 cups warm water


For the dough:

I combine the flour, yeast, salt, and sugar in the bowl of my mixer and combine, then slowly add the 2.5 cups of water.  Once it is mixed and still looking like soppy biscuit dough (if you're using a paddle, I usually do to avoid washing the whisk) I remove the hook and apply cling wrap to the bowl and just let it sit for 15-25 minutes for the autolyse.

After the autolyse I re-attatch the paddle and start in on the stir setting.  At this point I start adding flour gradually, I scoop it with a 1/2 cup and slowly introduce it in.  Once it appears to come together a little more I apply the dough hook.  Similar to JerryMac's recipe I'm usually looking for the dough to pull from the sides of the bowl but not quite the bottom.  I have added a little extra flour before and had the dough completely come off the bottom and that works fine too.  Once I get the dough seperated from the sides and not the bottom I increase the speed of the dough hook to 2 on my kitchenaid mixer and let it knead for a good 8-10 minutes. 

After the kneading is done I'll give it a brief hand knead and then put the dough into an oiled tupperware container with a rubberband at the level of the dough, cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel and allow to double in size.  Once the dough has doubled in size I'll dump it onto a floured countertop and tri-fold it several times.  After that I seperate the dough into 2-3 dough balls depending on the size of the pizza I'm after.

I let the dough balls rise again until they just about double near as my eyes can tell, then I reflour my counter and shape my skins.  Its more of a moist dough so it stretches pretty easily so I think it lends itself to more of a NY style but I have also made a thicker pie with it, both taste great to me.

That's it, dress the pie and slide it on your stone and cook as normal.  I use the stone on the bottom rack for a good 7 minutes or so.

Listen, I hope you all enjoy the recipe.  After my finals I'll make some more dough and get some more volume measurements.  I treated myself to a digital scale so I may try my hand at figuring it out by weight too.

I would really appreciate some constructive criticism with this recipe.  Like I said, its not my normal recipe, but an adaptation of my dear mother's famous french bread recipe.  I may just be partial to the taste because its nostalgic for me. 

I hope you all give it a shot and give me some honest feedback.  I've found that this makes a great emergency dough but if there's room for improvement I would certainly like to give it a shot.

Tonight is the first night I'll be trying to give a portion of my dough an overnight rise in the fridge to see how the flavors develop.  I'm sorta fearful that I may have way too much yeast for it to be successful.

DenaliPete


Offline KY Kernal

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12
  • Location: Bowling Green, KY
Re: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2008, 12:59:34 PM »
Help!  Hopefully Peetza can help me out, or if DenaliPete is still hanging around...November, anyone!  I got in late last night and thought I would try this emergency dough recipe and stay up late enough to have a late-night snack.  I made it til about right here:



 "I combine the flour, yeast, salt, and sugar in the bowl of my mixer and combine, then slowly add the 2.5 cups of water.  Once it is mixed and still looking like soppy biscuit dough (if you're using a paddle, I usually do to avoid washing the whisk) I remove the hook and apply cling wrap to the bowl and just let it sit for 15-25 minutes for the autolyse.

After the autolyse I re-attatch the paddle and start in on the stir setting.  At this point I start adding flour gradually, I scoop it with a 1/2 cup and slowly introduce it in.  Once it appears to come together a little more I apply the dough hook.  Similar to JerryMac's recipe I'm usually looking for the dough to pull from the sides of the bowl but not quite the bottom.  I have added a little extra flour before and had the dough completely come off the bottom and that works fine too.  Once I get the dough seperated from the sides and not the bottom I increase the speed of the dough hook to 2 on my kitchenaid mixer and let it knead for a good 8-10 minutes.

After the kneading is done I'll give it a brief hand knead and then put the dough into an oiled tupperware container with a rubberband at the level of the dough, cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel and allow to double in size..."

Then it got late and I put the dough in an oiled tupperware container and set it in the fridge.  Right before bed, I punched it down (if I didn't it was going to come out and attack, certainly because of the yeast amount and sugar)  I got up this morning, it looked great.  I took it out, floured it, separated it into two balls and put back in the fridge in two separated lightly oiled containers.  My question is, since I've never had to ditch out of an emergency dough recipe and refrigerate in midstream, so to speak, what would you recommend I do if I want to make a pie tonight?  Just pick up where this recipe says next, or would you suggest something different?  Thanks. :pizza:
The World Wants Results Not Excuses!

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21188
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2008, 01:31:25 PM »
KY Kernal,

If you can't use the dough until tonight, I would put the dough balls back in the refrigerator and hope that they don't overferment if they haven't already done so. It's hard to tell what percent of yeast (I assume that it is IDY) is used because an unspecified amount of additional flour beyond the initial 2 cups is added after the "autolyse" (it is technically not an autolyse because of the addition of yeast, salt and sugar but let's not quibble over that for now), but if the hydration based on 2 1/2 cups of water is around 68% like JerryMac's recipe (the dough clears the sides of the bowl but not the bottom), I estimate that the baker's percent for the yeast is around 2%, maybe a bit more. That is still a high percent but the dough might make it until tonight if kept refrigerated. If you see when you are ready to use the dough that it is wet and slack, and if it is hard to shape and slap out the skins without tears forming, then those would be clear signs of overfermentation. You might get a good flavored crust under the circumstances because of the fermentation byproducts, but you may not get good oven spring or crust color.

Please let us know what you experience and how things turn out.

Peter

Offline KY Kernal

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12
  • Location: Bowling Green, KY
Re: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2008, 02:09:42 PM »
Pete,
    Thanks.  I immediately put them back in the fridge before I left for work this morning, so we'll see.  They definitely had a real beerish aroma.  Back to the autolyse subject, I gotcha.  I did, however follow those instructions fairly closely.  After I had gotten into it, I realized that the recipe was open-ended with the flour addition, so after about at least 5 possible more half-cups of additional flour (Pilsbury Bread Flour) the thing finally started coming around.  I don't have a hydrometer, but it was still pretty danged wet by the time I got it into the container.   Thanks again for your help.  I'll post my results... :pizza:
The World Wants Results Not Excuses!

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21188
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2008, 03:05:53 PM »
KY Kernal,

On the basis of 2 1/2 cups of water and an estimated hydration of 68%, I estimated that the total flour was perhaps between 5 and 6 cups, maybe even a bit more.

Because of your addiction to emergency type doughs, you may want to complete an application for the pizzamaking.com 12-step plan. Upon completion of that program, you will be eligible to be a "guest" at the pizzamaking.com half-way house. Once we are satisfied that you can be released back into society and actually make a non-emergency pizza dough, you will receive a certificate to that effect, along with a bill for our services.

The photo below is our last guest at the pizzamaking.com half-way house. He, too, specialized in emergency pizza doughs.

Peter

Offline KY Kernal

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12
  • Location: Bowling Green, KY
Re: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2008, 03:45:38 PM »
That's a good one!  How did you get my picture?   ;D  Honestly, the last time I went to get on the forum and do my first long-term dough, there were so many choices, I wasn't able to make a decision.  What's your best gut answer (no pun intended) if I were to ask you for your advice on a first-time recipe utilizing fairly common ingredients (I probably will have to use bread flour)  Thanks again.  Funny stuff... :pizza:
The World Wants Results Not Excuses!

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21188
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2008, 04:07:15 PM »
KY Kernal,

In order not to send this thread off in another direction, you might want to start a new thread and indicate what kind of pizza you are after. I think we should be able to come up with a recipe for you to try. In that vein, it would help to know what pizza making gear you have available to make the dough and bake pizzas, and also what size pizza you have in mind. If you have a specific style in mind, such as NY style or American or cracker, it would be useful to know that also.

Peter

« Last Edit: December 10, 2008, 04:24:16 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline KY Kernal

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12
  • Location: Bowling Green, KY
Re: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2008, 04:35:39 PM »
Will do.  Here we go... :pizza:
The World Wants Results Not Excuses!

Offline DenaliPete

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 258
Re: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2009, 06:25:58 AM »
Pete-zza,

I noticed that you referenced this in another thread, I sincerely appreciate it as I'm partial to this recipe when I want short-notice pizza (I'm partial to my mamma's recipes too, I suppose.)

Have you had a chance to give this recipe a shot?  I know that you keep pretty busy with your own pizza work on this forum.  But should you get a wild hair, I'd really love to hear some feedback from the guru.  Even with pizza, I'm always seeking to move onward and upward.

If my measurements just aren't compatible, I'd be willing to throw down more concrete measurements to bring things as close to baseline as possible.

DenaliPete

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21188
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: DenaliPete's emergency dough recipe
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2009, 10:56:25 AM »
DanaliPete,

No, I have not tried your emergency dough recipe although, I can understand how you, as a student, can find it valuable to have a dough recipe that you can whip out on short notice. You indicated in your original post in this thread that you were considering converting your recipe from volume measurements to weight measurements. If you can do that for the flour and water, including the amount of additional flour use add to the mixer bowl, it should be fairly straightforward to convert your recipe to baker's percent format so that users can make whatever size pizza they want. You indicated that you divided the bulk dough into two or three pieces. What size pizzas are made from those dough pieces?

There are several members whose dough recipes I intend to try. It is just that I haven't been able to find the time to make them all.

Peter


 

pizzapan