Author Topic: pizza dough for desert use  (Read 45278 times)

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Offline cheese

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Re: pizza dough for desert use
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2006, 01:02:06 PM »
any body ever try making ice cream balls ? Just take leftover dough fry it and dip it into ice cream or stuff it with ice cream





                                                                                                 Cheese


Offline November

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Dessert Dough
« Reply #26 on: November 03, 2006, 03:29:55 AM »
This dough has no specific purpose other than to be a dessert dough.  Since I didn't intend it to be used as a pizza dough (my pizza dough never contains anything but plant byproducts), I didn't think it was worth creating a new thread for it, but at the same time someone might want to use it for their dessert pizza.  It bears some similarity to my Dutch Apple Pizza dough with the use of apple cider vinegar and cinnamon, but the resemblance is a result of a comprehensive objective.  I always use apple cider vinegar and cinnamon in dough anytime I want to mask part of the yeastiness due to the chemical interaction of these two ingredients with yeast.  If I hadn't designated this to be a sweet dough, I would use plain distilled vinegar and half the cinnamon.

  144 g   bread flour
  144 g   all-purpose flour
    84 g   water
    84 g   2% evaporated milk
    10 g   apple cider vinegar
    28 g   unsalted butter
      7 g   dark brown sugar
      4 g   kosher salt
      2 g   active dry yeast
   0.5 t   cinnamon

You can use 168g of regular 2% milk in place of the evaporated milk and water, but I separate the two so that I'm not heating the milk unnecessarily.  Bloom the yeast in 84g of 110 F water.  Wait until the temperature reaches 100 F and add cider vinegar, condensed milk, melted butter, brown sugar, salt, and cinnamon.  Stir and add flour.  Stir and knead.  That's the dough in its most generic form.  To add a pizza theme to the use of this dough, try the following:

Pizza Slice Cinnamon Rolls

Roll out the dough into a rectangular shape with a thickness of 0.25".  Coat the dough with a generous amount of melted butter.  Sprinkle a mix of 3 parts light brown sugar and 1 part cinnamon over the top.  Use your preferential judgment as to how much.  Pat down sugar to make sure it sticks well to the dough.  Use a pizza cutting wheel to cut 1" strips.  Roll the strips into pinwheel shapes.  Cup your hands around each pinwheel to mold them into pizza slice shapes as illustrated in the attached image.  Place each on a greased pan and bake at 350 F for about 15 minutes or until golden brown.  Add cream cheese (ah yes, a cheese officially makes it a pizza) frosting as illustrated so that there is the illusion of an outer crust.  What I didn't spend the time illustrating is certainly optional: take cinnamon imperials (red hots) and smash them flat to add the effect of pepperoni on top of the frosting.

- red.november

EDIT: One could use sweetened condensed milk if one does not have evaporated milk on hand.  Use 26g condensed milk, 55g extra water, and leave out the brown sugar.
EDIT 2: Broke away from the desert herd, and joined the dessert pack.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2006, 09:54:03 PM by November »

Offline Kidder

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Re: pizza dough for desert use
« Reply #27 on: November 03, 2006, 03:37:55 PM »
Wouldn't desert dough be rather dry? I mean there really isn't much water to work with there.  :)

Offline Kidder

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Re: pizza dough for desert use
« Reply #28 on: November 03, 2006, 09:23:40 PM »
Kidder,

If you are specifically referring to my desert dough, not really.  My dough contains about 160g of water, or about 55.555% hydration.  I don't want it too wet because I add butter to it when preparing cinnamon rolls.  The dough is in fact pretty sticky, not dry by most people's standards.

- red.november

EDIT: Most desert doughs need to be formulated so that they can withstand a lot of outside moisture from things like fillings, syrups, fruit, butter, etc.

You didn't catch the sarcasm did ya? Desert...as in dry, sandy Arizona/Sahara desert, unlike dessert which you meant. Sorry, just poking fun at your misspelling. It's all in good fun...... >:D

Offline November

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Re: pizza dough for desert use
« Reply #29 on: November 03, 2006, 09:50:50 PM »
Wow, thanks for catching that.  I guess it was one of those rare unconscious moments I just went with the spelling that came before me.  That's probably why I didn't get your joke.  Technically it wasn't my spelling, but I should have still caught it.  You're such a kidder.

I'm going to delete my response to you since it no longer has any relevance.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2006, 09:56:48 PM by November »

Offline Kidder

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Re: pizza dough for desert use
« Reply #30 on: November 03, 2006, 09:58:18 PM »
Wow, thanks for catching that.  I guess it was one of those rare unconscious moments I just went with the spelling that came before me.  That's probably why I didn't get your joke.  Technically it wasn't my spelling, but I should have still caught it.  You're such a kidder.

Well, I try to live up to my name. But really, good topic/post....

Offline pizzaman383

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Re: pizza dough for desert use
« Reply #31 on: November 22, 2006, 10:03:27 AM »
Folks,

I developed a pizza dough specifically for dessert pizzas.  It's an adaptation of a wonderful bread dough I found in the Breads of New England cookbook.  I hope you like it.

Herman Sourdough Starter
Make three to five days before you make the dough.
1/4 cup lukewarm tap water (105 - 115 degrees F)
1 pkg. (about 3/4 Tbsp.) active dry yeast (not quick-rise)
1 cup milk1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 cup sugar

Pour the water into a non-metallic mixing bowl. Make sure to use a bowl that is 5 to 6 times the size of the starter, or it will overflow the top.  Sprinkle in the yeast; stir gently for a few seconds. Let stand a few minutes. Add the milk, flour, and sugar and mix thoroughly with a non-metallic spoon.

Cover the bowl with a kitchen towel and place it in a draft-free place at room temperature overnight. The next day, place the starter in the refrigerator.  You can leave the starter refrigerated for three to five days; stir with a non-metallic spoon once or twice a day.

Herman Sourdough Pizza Dough
1/4 cup lukewarm tap water
1 tsp. active dry yeast (not quick-rise)
1 tsp. sugar
1 cup Herman Starter (made at least 3 - 5 days in advance)
2 Tbsp. vegetable shortening (melted)
2 To 2 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 tsp. salt
unbleached all-purpose flour (for kneading)

Dissolve the yeast in the half cup water in a small bowl or cup; stir gently for a few seconds.  Let stand a few minutes.
Pour the water and yeast into the large mixing bowl with the Herman Starter, the sugar, the melted shortening, and the salt. Mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon. Add two cups of the flour and mix well.  You may need to add up to an
additional half cup or so of flour if the dough is very wet or very sticky.  Note that this dough has a higher water content than other doughs, so resist the temptation to add too much flour.  In addition to being sticky, the dough will be quite light and airy when baked.

Knead the dough until the dough is smooth and elastic.  Shape the dough into a ball for rising.
 
This dough is best when hand-stretched or rolled out into a thin crust. Assemble the pizza on a pizza peel or pizza screen.

This dough has a higher sugar content so it may brown or burn more quickly than a normal pizza dough.
Author - Passionate About Pizza: Making Great Homemade Pizza


 

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