Author Topic: Essen1's NY-style pizza project  (Read 110321 times)

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #240 on: November 19, 2009, 11:49:19 PM »
Mike,

I used a 50/50 blend of Trader Joe's PS and WM mozz on tonight's pizza and it was hands down the best mozz I've used so far.  It melted just like I wanted it to and wasn't greasy at all.  Incidentally, it was also the least expensive cheese I've used.  Thanks for the suggestion.  I'm going to go with Trader Joe's mozz from now on!

Matt

Matt,

Glad you liked it. I told you it was good.  ;D

And very affordable compared to the Precious or Safeway brands. I do like the Grande but it's too expensive here at over $7 for less than a pound at Whole Foods. And they are the only ones carrying it.

I don't know where you located but I stopped by at TJ's tonight, too, and restocked on the cheese. Here in SF, CA we get the mozzarella at TJ's shown below.

Btw, they also carry Crimini mushrooms, the ones I usually use on my pies, at $1.69 for 8oz.

And I found a can of organic tomato sauce I'm going to incorporate in my next batch of sauce.

« Last Edit: November 19, 2009, 11:54:49 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

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Offline cup-o-pizza

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #241 on: November 20, 2009, 09:16:04 AM »
That's the brand of mozz I bought yesterday.   8)

I need to start experimenting with other toppings.  I love mushrooms, so maybe I'll pick some of those crimini ones up next time I'm at TJs.  I've been very happy with using 6 in 1 for my sauce.  I just add salt, pepper, and simple blend of common italian seasonings.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2009, 09:18:11 AM by cup-o-pizza »
Matt

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Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #242 on: November 20, 2009, 12:47:20 PM »

And I found a can of organic tomato sauce I'm going to incorporate in my next batch of sauce.


Ah, good, I think? And maybe you have discussed this before, if so sorry to be redundant, but when you say "next batch" you cook an actual proper sauce then. (?) You're not what Tony Soprano refers to as a " 'Wonder bread wop', the kind of guy that eats his Sunday gravy out of a jar", are you?

I won't get started on this topic again, I've made the ketchup pouring on raw pizza dough photo shops, I've corrected people who say whole tomatoes out of a jar are fully cooked, I've tried to inspire with rough recipes and protocol to no avail. Instead I'll just keep making my great sauce and will commend you for your efforts in making a great pizza crust, and taking the additional effort to not top it with Campbell's tomato soup.

Unless your "batch" is just the above can with some oregano or pizza seasoning tossed in, then I quickly retract any aforementioned praising.  ;D
« Last Edit: November 20, 2009, 12:51:50 PM by NY pizzastriver »
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #243 on: November 20, 2009, 02:57:35 PM »
That's the brand of mozz I bought yesterday.   8)

I need to start experimenting with other toppings.  I love mushrooms, so maybe I'll pick some of those crimini ones up next time I'm at TJs.  I've been very happy with using 6 in 1 for my sauce.  I just add salt, pepper, and simple blend of common italian seasonings.

Matt,

I use the 6in1s also. The tomato sauce is only used to make the the pizza sauce a bit smoother and to dilute the 6in1sa bit instead of using water. Add a tad more flavor, too.

The Criminis are pretty good. Better than the regular white mushrooms, imho.


Jimbo,

I'm sorry to disappoint but I don't 'cook' my sauce.

I just, carefully and with lots and lots of love, put my sauce together. But now I think I have to try the Campell's soup on my pies accompanied by lots of gravy to dip any left-over crust in it. Ahhh....Gravy!  ;D

Mike

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #244 on: November 20, 2009, 04:54:29 PM »
Mike,

I have set forth below a protocol for your next poolish-based experiment. For the basic dough formulation for the experiment, I used a modified version of the dough formulation you posted at Reply 209 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8093.msg83584.html#msg83584. The total amount of dough was selected to produce four dough balls, each weighing 375 grams, which is the dough ball weight you previously used. I used a bowl residue compensation, as noted below, to compensate for minor dough losses during the preparation of the dough. That is why the dough ball weights shown in the dough formulation below are a bit larger than 375 grams.

Since you set a start time for the preparation of the poolish at 6 PM, I settled on a 3-hour poolish. That means that you will have to complete the Final Mix at around 9 PM. The poolish is a classic poolish with 100% hydration. For the amount of poolish (less yeast) to use for the experiment, I decided to use 50% of the usual range of 20-80% of the total formula water. That way, based on your results, you can move the needle in either direction to increase or decrease the total amount of the poolish for future experiments. Ideally, the poolish should reach the break point at the expiration of the 3-hour prefermentation period. That period is based on the water temperature and the room temperature. As noted below, you should use the water for the poolish at 60 degrees F. Normally, the temperature of prefermentation of the poolish is 80-85 degrees F. I assumed that your room temperature is perhaps around 70 degrees F. So, to compensate for the difference in temperature, I increased the amount of yeast for the poolish from the value that would be used for a room temperature of 80-85 degrees F. Because the poolish is very temperature sensitive, you may want to monitor the progress of the poolish to see if it reaches the break point at the expiration of the 3-hour period, or thereabouts. You will note that I did not specify any salt for the poolish. The reason is that a classic poolish normally does not use any salt. I confirmed this from the Rosada article and Professor Calvel’s book The Taste of Bread.

Ideally, for the Final Mix, you will want to use the remaining formula water at a temperature to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 75-80 degrees F. The poolish should already be at room temperature. You might want to note the finished dough temperature in case future adjustments are needed.

The total formula yeast was selected so that you might be able to start making pizzas at around noon on the following day, and for some time thereafter. In accordance with your request, the dough will go into the refrigerator aftet the Final Mix. You will want to decide whether to do the division and scaling of the dough before or after refrigeration. Since I can’t accurately predict the outer limit of the window of use of the dough, you will want to monitor the development of the dough to be sure that it does not overferment.

Here are the particulars:

Total Dough Formulation
50/50 KABF/SBBF Flour Blend (100%):
Water (63%):
IDY (0.35%):
Sea Salt (2.5%):
Olive Oil (2%):
Raw Sugar (2%):
Total (169.85%):
Single Ball:
905.21 g  |  31.93 oz | 2 lbs
570.28 g  |  20.12 oz | 1.26 lbs
3.17 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.05 tsp | 0.35 tbsp
22.63 g | 0.8 oz | 0.05 lbs | 4.05 tsp | 1.35 tbsp
18.1 g | 0.64 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.02 tsp | 1.34 tbsp
18.1 g | 0.64 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.54 tsp | 1.51 tbsp
1537.5 g | 54.23 oz | 3.39 lbs | TF = N/A
384.37 g | 13.56 oz | 0.85 lbs
Note: For four 375 g dough balls; bowl residue compensation = 2.5%

3-Hour Poolish
100% KABF/SBBF Flour Blend: 285.14 g
100% Water (60 degrees F): 285.14 g
0.60% IDY: 1.71 g (0.57 t., or a bit more than ½ t.)
Total: 571.99 g
Note: Poolish weight (less yeast) is 50% of the total formula water; water temperature for the poolish is 60 degrees F; assumed room temperature is 70 degrees F

Final Mix
Poolish: 571.99 g
Remaining 50/50 KABF/SBBF Flour Blend: 620.07 g
Remaining formula water: 285.14 g
Remaining IDY: 1.46 g (0.48 t., or a bit less than 1/2 t.)
Sea Salt: 22.63 g
Olive Oil: 18.1 g
Raw Sugar: 18.1 g
Total: 1537.5 g
Note: Use water temperature to achieve a finished dough temperature of about 75-80 degrees F

Good luck. I hope it works.

Peter

Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #245 on: November 20, 2009, 05:54:47 PM »

But now I think I have to try the Campell's soup on my pies accompanied by lots of gravy to dip any left-over crust in it. Ahhh....Gravy!  ;D



Lol, oh well, and by the way "gravy" refers to tomato sauce. And yes, when it's real sauce the crusts are great dipped into a side of it!
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #246 on: November 20, 2009, 06:37:24 PM »
Mike,

I have set forth below a protocol for your next poolish-based experiment. For the basic dough formulation for the experiment, I used a modified version of the dough formulation you posted at Reply 209 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8093.msg83584.html#msg83584. The total amount of dough was selected to produce four dough balls, each weighing 375 grams, which is the dough ball weight you previously used. I used a bowl residue compensation, as noted below, to compensate for minor dough losses during the preparation of the dough. That is why the dough ball weights shown in the dough formulation below are a bit larger than 375 grams.

Since you set a start time for the preparation of the poolish at 6 PM, I settled on a 3-hour poolish. That means that you will have to complete the Final Mix at around 9 PM. The poolish is a classic poolish with 100% hydration. For the amount of poolish (less yeast) to use for the experiment, I decided to use 50% of the usual range of 20-80% of the total formula water. That way, based on your results, you can move the needle in either direction to increase or decrease the total amount of the poolish for future experiments. Ideally, the poolish should reach the break point at the expiration of the 3-hour prefermentation period. That period is based on the water temperature and the room temperature. As noted below, you should use the water for the poolish at 60 degrees F. Normally, the temperature of prefermentation of the poolish is 80-85 degrees F. I assumed that your room temperature is perhaps around 70 degrees F. So, to compensate for the difference in temperature, I increased the amount of yeast for the poolish from the value that would be used for a room temperature of 80-85 degrees F. Because the poolish is very temperature sensitive, you may want to monitor the progress of the poolish to see if it reaches the break point at the expiration of the 3-hour period, or thereabouts. You will note that I did not specify any salt for the poolish. The reason is that a classic poolish normally does not use any salt. I confirmed this from the Rosada article and Professor Calvel’s book The Taste of Bread.

Ideally, for the Final Mix, you will want to use the remaining formula water at a temperature to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 75-80 degrees F. The poolish should already be at room temperature. You might want to note the finished dough temperature in case future adjustments are needed.

The total formula yeast was selected so that you might be able to start making pizzas at around noon on the following day, and for some time thereafter. In accordance with your request, the dough will go into the refrigerator aftet the Final Mix. You will want to decide whether to do the division and scaling of the dough before or after refrigeration. Since I can’t accurately predict the outer limit of the window of use of the dough, you will want to monitor the development of the dough to be sure that it does not overferment.

Here are the particulars:

Total Dough Formulation
50/50 KABF/SBBF Flour Blend (100%):
Water (63%):
IDY (0.35%):
Sea Salt (2.5%):
Olive Oil (2%):
Raw Sugar (2%):
Total (169.85%):
Single Ball:
905.21 g  |  31.93 oz | 2 lbs
570.28 g  |  20.12 oz | 1.26 lbs
3.17 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.05 tsp | 0.35 tbsp
22.63 g | 0.8 oz | 0.05 lbs | 4.05 tsp | 1.35 tbsp
18.1 g | 0.64 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.02 tsp | 1.34 tbsp
18.1 g | 0.64 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.54 tsp | 1.51 tbsp
1537.5 g | 54.23 oz | 3.39 lbs | TF = N/A
384.37 g | 13.56 oz | 0.85 lbs
Note: For four 375 g dough balls; bowl residue compensation = 2.5%

3-Hour Poolish
100% KABF/SBBF Flour Blend: 285.14 g
100% Water (60 degrees F): 285.14 g
0.60% IDY: 1.71 g (0.57 t., or a bit more than ½ t.)
Total: 571.99 g
Note: Poolish weight (less yeast) is 50% of the total formula water; water temperature for the poolish is 60 degrees F; assumed room temperature is 70 degrees F

Final Mix
Poolish: 571.99 g
Remaining 50/50 KABF/SBBF Flour Blend: 620.07 g
Remaining formula water: 285.14 g
Remaining IDY: 1.46 g (0.48 t., or a bit less than 1/2 t.)
Sea Salt: 22.63 g
Olive Oil: 18.1 g
Raw Sugar: 18.1 g
Total: 1537.5 g
Note: Use water temperature to achieve a finished dough temperature of about 75-80 degrees F

Good luck. I hope it works.

Peter


Wow!

Thanks so much for your help, Peter.  ;D

I'm going to follow your protocol above as close as possible and will let you know about the outcome. I'll also take note on the dough temps or any possible fluctuations from your original formula if that should happen. I doubt it, though. The only thing I might have to adjust is the room temp tomorrow since it's a little chilly here right now but that's just a minor adjustment on my thermostat.

I'm anxious to see the results. Maybe a preferment is the way to go if one wants to achieve a good NY-style crust at home. I have yet to hear about any NY pizza makers who use the poolish method, although Evelyne Slomon mentioned something over at the PMQ about it, but it can never hurt to try. I think I posted the link here somewhere. Gotta find it.

Peter, again, thanks so much for putting all the work into this. I let you know on Sunday how things went, incl. a detailed report.

Mike

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #247 on: November 20, 2009, 06:38:21 PM »
Lol, oh well, and by the way "gravy" refers to tomato sauce. And yes, when it's real sauce the crusts are great dipped into a side of it!

But Jimbo...I wanted real gravy, you know, like Turkey gravy or brown gravy.  :'(
Mike

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #248 on: November 20, 2009, 06:40:00 PM »
Matt,

Here's a bit more info on the company that makes the "North Beach" mozzarella if that's of any interest. They actually have a nice selection of other cheeses, too.

http://www.pacificcheese.com/brands.html#grandeurope
Mike

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #249 on: November 20, 2009, 07:36:22 PM »
I have yet to hear about any NY pizza makers who use the poolish method, although Evelyne Slomon mentioned something over at the PMQ about it, but it can never hurt to try.

Mike,

Once in a while a poster at the PMQ Think Tank will ask about using preferments, and Tom Lehmann will usually respond and occasionally post a typical preferment-based dough formulation (such as one using a sponge or old dough), but there has been little feedback on actual results. Most pizza operators are not trying to be artisan pizza makers and may even have trouble handling all of the math. Also, preferments like poolish and sponge are so sensitive to temperatures that, unless you have a special temperature-controlled facility (and probably humidity control also) dedicated to the preparation of the preferments, you are likely to experience a lot of variations over the course of the year as ambient temperatures change with the seasons. You really have to be really serious about your pizza making to deal with these kinds of matters. It is not the sort of activity that you are likely to turn over to a bunch of high school kids.

Peter


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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #250 on: November 20, 2009, 08:09:38 PM »
Once in a while a poster at the PMQ Think Tank will ask about using preferments, and Tom Lehmann will usually respond and occasionally post a typical preferment-based dough formulation (such as one using a sponge or old dough), but there has been little feedback on actual results.

Mike,

Here is an example of a thread at the PMQ Think Tank on the use of the sponge method to make pizza dough: http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=25503#25503.

Peter

Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #251 on: November 20, 2009, 10:16:53 PM »
Mike,

Here is an example of a thread at the PMQ Think Tank on the use of the sponge method to make pizza dough: http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=25503#25503.

Peter

The first thing I notice is the 2-1 ratio of flour and water, opposed to the 1-1 we speak of here.
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #252 on: November 21, 2009, 09:04:40 AM »
The first thing I notice is the 2-1 ratio of flour and water, opposed to the 1-1 we speak of here.

Jim,

That is correct. Mike and I are talking about using a poolish, which is elaborated by using equal weights of flour and water to yield a hydration of 100%. Tom calls his 20/40 ratio of water to flour a sponge, but its hydration is more like a classic biga, which typically is a stiff preferment with a hydration of around 50-55%. If Mike wants at some point to convert his dough formulation to a biga format, that is certainly possible. I once did something like that with the basic Lehmann NY style dough formulation, but in the context of a take-and-bake version of that formulation, as I discussed at Reply 362 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg23239.html#msg23239.

Peter

Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #253 on: November 21, 2009, 12:12:18 PM »
OK, I'm with you. Yes this is interesting, the new formula of yours above, in that you hit beak point in 3 hrs, then do final mix, then balls into fridge. I am anxious to see the results.
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #254 on: November 21, 2009, 03:28:34 PM »
OK, I'm with you. Yes this is interesting, the new formula of yours above, in that you hit beak point in 3 hrs, then do final mix, then balls into fridge. I am anxious to see the results.

I'll make sure I take pics of the individual steps and the outcome.
Mike

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Offline s00da

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #255 on: November 21, 2009, 05:28:04 PM »
If Karl Benz and Gottlieb Daimler wouldn’t have explored many avenues before they invented the first gas-powered car and combustion engine respectively, I’m sure they would not have succeeded, don’t you think?

I totally agree. I myself got inspired initially by varasano's page and gradually found myself making neapolitan pies. Now I ended up with my true love  :-[ the 18" NY. Who knows what's next!

I did try lower oil percentages, really. And I eliminated oil altogether in some of my doughs, too, just for s#$*s and giggles, and ended up with a Frisbee with a pizza theme on it. Yes, it flew well, thanks for asking. Which reminds me to get a dog…

For this to happen at a temp of 620F+, what mode are you using in the oven? I was never aware of the different modes I have in my oven until I started making baguettes. Cuz I have pizza mode in it and it basically blows hot air like crazy. Convection mode. and for baguettes it was just not right. It would make the crust brown too quickly and even burn them poor baguettes.

Saad

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #256 on: November 21, 2009, 05:56:28 PM »
It will be very interesting to see the results of the dough formulation put together by Pete. Initially, I think it will have a well browned crust with a sweet taste.

Mike,
Mike,

Once in a while a poster at the PMQ Think Tank will ask about using preferments, and Tom Lehmann will usually respond and occasionally post a typical preferment-based dough formulation (such as one using a sponge or old dough), but there has been little feedback on actual results. Most pizza operators are not trying to be artisan pizza makers and may even have trouble handling all of the math. Also, preferments like poolish and sponge are so sensitive to temperatures that, unless you have a special temperature-controlled facility (and probably humidity control also) dedicated to the preparation of the preferments, you are likely to experience a lot of variations over the course of the year as ambient temperatures change with the seasons. You really have to be really serious about your pizza making to deal with these kinds of matters. It is not the sort of activity that you are likely to turn over to a bunch of high school kids.

Peter

Peter, I like Reinhart's method of preparing the poolish or any pre-ferment. He really doesn't bother much about the timing cuz he prepares a 4-hours poolish and doesn't look for a breaking point. He would target when it's really bubbly and then retard it in the fridge to be used the next day and up to 2 days.  I believe this way is very efficient in making the process simple and still achieve a good flavor through retardation. I think his assumption is that retarding when the poolish is bubbly will extend the window around the breaking point. Thus, giving a great flexibility when using a preferment.

Saad

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #257 on: November 21, 2009, 08:30:49 PM »
Saad,

All I was trying to do is to offer up another possibility for Mike to consider. He may not even like it as much as his last approach. But there are so many other possible variations of poolish and other preferments that he will never run out of experiments to conduct in his quest to find the one he likes the best for his NY style. I laid out all of the math for my example to serve as guidance to Mike should he decide to make modifications based on the results he achieves. Maybe others will also be encouraged to conduct their own experiments.

I agree that one doesn't have to stand over a poolish to get the break point at exactly the right time. If the poolish is bubbly like you said, that is usually around the break point anyway. Even after the break point, there is a reasonable period of time to use it or refrigerate it. Most of my comments relative to the poolish were with respect to its use in a commercial setting. In a home setting, we don't have to be as fussy.

Peter

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #258 on: November 26, 2009, 12:53:02 PM »
Okay, first off I apologize for the delay in reporting back on last weekend’s experiment but work was crazy before the holidays and besides a few quick posts here and there, I wasn’t able to write a longer one, detailing everything. And frankly, a couple of Hockey games (Go Sharks!) distracted me.  ;) But it was nice to kick back and have cold one, though.

With that said, on to the report.

As you can see from the pics below I had Peter’s recommendations/instructions with me at all times!  :chef:

I started the preferment a little after 6:00 pm on Saturday and tried to match Peter’s recommendation of a water temp 60° F but ended up at 62°F. Since I started later than 6:00 pm, I gave it an additional 30mins to do its job and checked back at 9:45 pm.

I started by adding the water to the mixing bowl, then sifted in the flour and added the yeast on top before incorporating everything with the back of a wooden spoon. Once everything was stirred together, I used the paddle attachment to mix it well and gave it 3.5 hrs of rest. The pics below show the progress.

I sifted in the rest of the flour, added the rest of the water, the oil, sugar and sea salt and used the dough hook to incorporate everything (Pic below). I followed the same mixing regimen I used before which you can read here (2nd paragraph) http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8093.msg83757.html#msg83757

Unfortunately, I ran out of batteries for my cam and was unable to take any pics between the steps of the first rest period and the finished dough balls. I made a run to my local pharmacy store and got some new batteries, though. Anyway, the dough came out at 82°F and I decided against an individual rise and did an overnight bulk-rise instead.

The next morning around 10:00am, after having coffee, a bowl of cereal, feeding the cat, and checking out which footballs games are on TV (Niners lost, btw  :'( ), I divided the dough into four balls at 375gr each and placed them in my dough box (Pic below) and left them out on the counter since I wanted to see how this formula holds up against an extended day use.

I contacted a neighbor of mine, who’s a self-proclaimed pizza fanatic, a guy in his mid-fifties who grew up in Chicago on deep-dish and thin Chicago crusts but has also lived in New York for 20 years. I figured he knows his pies, right? I’ll post his assessment in a separate post. But he was my first taste tester, or guinea pig if you will.

Anyway, the first pizza went to him – a simple cheese & pepperoni. The dough handled and stretched very easily, had a wonderful smell to it, not sour but more of a nicely fermented, yeasty dough. Hard to accurately describe and pinpoint, but it was wonderful. I didn’t get to take pics of the first dough but when watching it bake, the oven spring and rise was incredible. Never seen anything like it so far.

The crust puffed up in matter of a minute and it didn’t come out dry or too crunchy. It had a nice balance of firmness, crispness and softness to it when it came out of the oven.

In regards to the cheese, it was a combo of low-moist., part-skim and low-moist., whole-milk from TJ’s with a pinch of salt added and a tad of Grana Padano from TJ’s grated in. The pepperoni was the Bridgford Pepperoni brand, which I find superior to any other brand I have tried so far. It has no excessive “oiling off”, the taste is great, and no oily/orange coloring of the cheese, for the lack of better terms to describe it.

The second one was a mushroom/salami pie, with Crimini ‘shrooms from TJ’s and Columbus Dry Salame. However, there are no pictures of pies 3 & 4. I dropped the camera and I had to put it together…works fine, but the “zoom” control isn’t as smooth as it was, doesn’t snap back any longer. Anyone know of a good repair shop in the BA?

When you look at the crust pics of the Salami/Mushrooms pie, you’ll see the crust is very fluffy, airy and light but was a bit too chewy for my taste although the aftertaste of the crust was impressive…it had a slight hint of “breadiness”, had a nice aroma, a subtle hint of sweetness…in other words, the crust has “Rockstar” material.

However, I couldn’t make all four pizzas that day so I kept two dough balls and put them back in the fridge. The next day, after letting them come up to room temp for about an hour, I noticed that they were actually overfermenting and were hard to work with. Too many bubbles that created thin spots and almost no oven spring. I didn’t even bother to take any pictures.

Preliminary conclusion:

I think the dough formula is excellent if used the same day, all day long and used consecutively. The preferment added nice texture and structure to the crust as well as flavor, which were lacking in same-day formulas I’ve made previously without the preferment. In regards to the ‘commercial’ use, I think it could be done if some modifications would be made in terms of preventing the dough balls of fermenting too fast because I could imagine that a in a commercial setting the room temp would be quite higher than in a home setting. Overall, the crust was great with room for improvement.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #259 on: November 26, 2009, 12:57:20 PM »
And here are the rest of the pictures. The coloration issue is still there for some reason. I have a hunch that it might be the flour combo I use because I went through four possible solutions, adding reg. sugar, adding honey, adding sugar and honey and using organic sugar, but to no avail.


Edit: Posted one pic twice (crust2)
« Last Edit: November 26, 2009, 03:13:46 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/