Author Topic: Success with unconventional yeast!  (Read 938 times)

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Offline Steve973

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  • Age: 41
  • Location: Baltimore, MD
  • I love brewing beer and making pizza!
Success with unconventional yeast!
« on: November 18, 2009, 08:47:43 PM »
I have been wondering what would happen if I used "wild" beer yeast in my pizza dough.  So I took the dregs from a beer fermented entirely with 2 strains of Brettanomyces yeast (claussenii and bruxellensis) and mixed up my usual batch of Lehmann-style pizza dough.  For those that will be curious about my specific recipe:

Flour (100%):
Water (62%):
ADY (0.36%):
Salt (1.05%):
Oil (0.84%):
Sugar (1.5%):
Total (165.75%):
265.93 g  |  9.38 oz | 0.59 lbs
164.88 g  |  5.82 oz | 0.36 lbs
0.96 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.25 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
2.79 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
2.23 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
3.99 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
440.78 g | 15.55 oz | 0.97 lbs | TF = 0.101

Instead of using ADY, I included the collected yeast sediment from the bottle, along with some of the liquid, and considered that to be a part of the total amount of water.  Not exactly the most precise way to measure things, I guess.  So I mixed the dough up and let it sit at room temperature for two days.  Today was day two, and I noticed that the dough had doubled in volume.  I heated my oven to 550 (convection) and preheated my stone for almost an hour.  When I tossed the dough, it was a little softer than what I'm normally used to with refrigerator-retarded dough, but it was still nice to work with even though it required a bit more care.  The pizza was done after the usual six minutes, and I noticed a very nice crust rim rise, great coloration, an airy and open (but chewy) crumb, and some great sourdough flavor!  This was such a great success and such a nice surprise that I don't think I even want to bother with conventional yeast anymore unless speed is of the essence.  At any rate, I think this will be the first of several more experiments to come.  So, without further adieu, here are the links to the pictures.  I would attach them, but I'd rather have links with better resolution.

Whole pizza:
http://i45.tinypic.com/oj3ybp.jpg

Another view:
http://i50.tinypic.com/8zp7ch.jpg

Crust rim:
http://i46.tinypic.com/2dj2mat.jpg

Cross section:
http://i49.tinypic.com/2jb020o.jpg

Crust rim 2:
http://i45.tinypic.com/2zqtyf5.jpg

Crust coloration:
http://i48.tinypic.com/i1wp3d.jpg
« Last Edit: November 18, 2009, 09:56:11 PM by Steve973 »
"Right here, right now, from the very beginning, there is only one thing. Constantly clear and unexplained, having never been born and having never died, it cannot be named or described." - Zen Master So Sahn


Offline widespreadpizza

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    • my beer store opening in june 2011
Re: Success with unconventional yeast!
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2009, 09:16:04 PM »
Steve,  nice job!  here are some test that I ran a while ago.  Why I do not keep using these yeasts I do not know.  I  guess my sourdough prevails and doesnt cost 2.00 a packet.  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7151.0.html  keep on testing...  -marc

Offline Steve973

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 56
  • Age: 41
  • Location: Baltimore, MD
  • I love brewing beer and making pizza!
Re: Success with unconventional yeast!
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2009, 09:57:10 PM »
Made a correction to the original post: the dough fermented at room temperature for two days, instead of three like I originally said.
"Right here, right now, from the very beginning, there is only one thing. Constantly clear and unexplained, having never been born and having never died, it cannot be named or described." - Zen Master So Sahn


 

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