Author Topic: Pizzarium  (Read 140359 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #340 on: January 28, 2011, 06:38:38 AM »
Jet_deck,

For your first attempt I think you did great!  :) Some of us have been trying for about a year to make a pizza like Pizzarium.  What kind of different taste in the crumb did you taste.  Your pizza does look airy.  Did you proof the dough at all?  Your crumb looks like it was springy.  Was it?  It makes me wonder since your dough didnít double in 3 hrs., if you would have left it rise longer, what kind of results you might have gotten.

Nice job.

Norma

Matt,

You are right, that this kind of pizza is a hard one to make.  I also hope Katie can shed some light on the easiest way to make this kind of pizza. 

Norma
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Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #341 on: January 28, 2011, 08:26:02 AM »
John,
This is a tough one to nail & it's hit & miss.  FWIW my starter batch last week was also an Epic Loss.  It was the 1st & last time I use Caputo Red for pizza in Teglia.  To me, the best mix is 85/15 Manitoba to Semola.  Keep at it bro!  Hopefully Katie can shed some light.
BTW: How are the pans?  Mine are still on backorder.

Matt

Matt - I don't have access to Manitoba flour, and quite frankly I still do not know what the equivalent flour is. I thought the 14% Ultimate Performer was it, but apparently not with the results I got. Or it could be my workflow needs a different direction.

On the pans, they made a huge difference in the bake. So much so that I think they do not need to be placed on the stone. The bottoms were very evenly overdone. I seasoned them by oiling and then baking at 375 for 30 minutes.

Norma - Thanks for the encouragement! I am still going to keep at it.

John


Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #343 on: January 28, 2011, 08:48:38 AM »
For anyone that might be interested,  I am learning how to navagiate the pizza.it forum.  Here is one post by Marco on making pizza in telgia.  He said one student of  Gabriel did a wonderful pan with Caputo Red and Manitoba. translated:

The pan pizza is the one that Gabriel ...

But in general it is normal to be full of water to cook the whole time, otherwise you bread ....

In Naples, a student of Gabriel did a wonderful pan with the red and Manitoba ....

http://www.pizza.it/forum/pizza/ShowMessage.asp?ID=37210

Another post by Marco.  http://www.pizza.it/forum/pizza/ShowMessage.asp?ID=37194

Translated for anyone that canít read Italian.

Surely everyone can 'do as he wishes, but we clarify a little bit of trivia ....

First of all, if a mill study uses two types of flour for two opposite and instead advice you to reverse, we should begin to take some questions.

The focaccia and pizza in a pan to be made with higher inpasti hydrated, often with double dough, cha need strong flour and / or who have very strong long maturation, and should seek to maintain a gluten that "holds". 

Then explain the theory that with a little flour with baking powder is necessary to use more force ... (And please note here is that the enzymatic activity of the flour that is added with the yeast ...) If I use a stronger flour for pizza I do (see photo) and do not change jobs, I find myself with a gummy pasta and / or closed, perhaps even a little difficult to cut ....

Do you remember the pictures of the eaves of Cyrus made with 100% Barilla??

Pixior one reply to Marco, translated

http://www.pizza.it/forum/pizza/ShowMessage.asp?ID=37138

Hello Mark,

The focaccia and pizza in a pan of flour do not need power because 'the dough to rise and remains stationary when fired and is' more than most of the rise without having to' handle. You can use a higher dose of yeast and thus shorten the time.
For the pizza paddle in hand, and 'better to work with long maturity and with a little yeast. In this way you get the best results Paving and cooking (cornice & co.).

For long rising yeast and with little 'need to use flour with a little' more 'strength. So for me the Red and 'perfect.


... (And please note here is that the enzymatic activity of the flour that is added with the yeast ...) If I use a stronger flour for pizza I do (see photo) and do not change jobs, I find myself with a gummy pasta and / or closed, perhaps even a little difficult to cut ....

This post is by gabriele translated:

http://www.pizza.it/forum/pizza/ShowMessage.asp?ID=2916

Message:
And what did you cut it with the strong?
To the pan, since the absorption and the fear of starting a season in qty poolisch who do you recommend?
I thought of a 50% in the red W360
             20% Manitoba
             30% PIZZASOIA

You say, good or bad knowing a little wheat flour believe the two to reach a trance. to an absorption of 1150/1200 in 1000 of H2o

you say?

cazzeggiano?
preovo?

hello gabriele

another post by gabriele translated:

http://www.pizza.it/forum/pizza/ShowMessage.asp?ID=2933

but but but .... organoleptic analysis .... it is known in the finished product ... and tell me a little stefano .. As if to make the swords?
then there is only soy lecithin, no soy meal (which I do not know it) and no soy flour ...
Cost? You have the list?
Are you using Spadoni?
Not me gusta hang with the white, just maybe a mixture of semolina and large cuts regrind, white makes the jelly ... better a little wet and released it just a little spring that I throw around ... as to whether in fact they are not to start you had a little tolerance for a product such as me knows that I am not na lira ...
Spadoni only know the line from the supermarket.
Give me the site address where you copied the card?

Does this post mean that soy lecithin might be used in Gabrieleís dough?

Another post by Gabriele translated:

http://www.pizza.it/forum/pizza/ShowMessage.asp?ID=2942

.. Well, I use the pan to spread the flour, only the edges and anoint his hands better not, otherwise "tigers" where the oil is imprinted.

Spy on the loaf on the counter until they surrender a bit of force pushing outward (edges) with 3 fingers and press into the dough to bring the beading cabbage, step on the pan, I prefer a 60x40 steel blue food and putting their fingers in the dough the port to the edge of the pan only half working slowly, helping to relax the dough without pulling it, then maybe a dunk before the season I give ... So they taught me, and I tried everything to ungerrmi hands, wet, apply without flour, less flour, but the result is good, without fault gave it to me this method.
Very nice, seems to pull a tissue.
This is why I asked the Spolverini ...
I thought it was a particular cut of good meal.

Does this post mean the dough is proofed after putting the dough in the pan?

I donít know if any of these posts help.  If anyone want me to keep looking, let me know.

Norma
« Last Edit: January 28, 2011, 08:50:38 AM by norma427 »
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Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #344 on: January 28, 2011, 09:13:30 AM »
Jet_deck,

For your first attempt I think you did great!  Norma


Thank you Norma.  I consider it another work in progress.   The pizza with the most open crumb was springy.  I think the salt and the oil were what made it taste so good.
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Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #345 on: January 28, 2011, 09:42:27 AM »
There is an article on Slice by Adam Kuban, this morning on Pizza Roma in NY.  The articles show pictures of the dough.

http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/01/greenwich-village-pizza-roma-roman-style-pizza-manhattan-nyc.html#continued

Norma
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Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #346 on: January 28, 2011, 10:39:31 AM »
There is an article on Slice by Adam Kuban, this morning on Pizza Roma in NY.  The articles show pictures of the dough.

http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/01/greenwich-village-pizza-roma-roman-style-pizza-manhattan-nyc.html#continued

Norma

Funny - That pie and crumb look almost exact to my failed attempt posted yesterday.

John

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #347 on: January 28, 2011, 04:22:10 PM »
John,

Well, failed might be a bit strong!  Like your recent pie, the Pizza Roma pie seems to a denser crumb.  I wonder if that is typical for their place.  Their dough certainly looks pretty hydrated. Maybe 96 hrs is too long and the gluten looses it.  I'm liking 85% HR or so. On the other hand, isn't the "Gabriel" recipe like 70% HR.  That dough certainly looks easier to deal with.

Do you like your blue steel pans? Does one need to cure them somehow like cast iron?

Paul

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #348 on: January 28, 2011, 06:07:31 PM »
Could someone tell me what the green things are on top of this pizza in teglia?  Dried Celery spines? Probably not.  Thanks in advance.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1690.msg28913.html#msg28913

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Offline Matthew

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #349 on: January 28, 2011, 06:09:24 PM »
Could someone tell me what the green things are on top of this pizza in teglia?  Dried Celery spines? Probably not.  Thanks in advance.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1690.msg28913.html#msg28913



Rosemary


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #350 on: January 29, 2011, 08:12:55 AM »
John,

Well, failed might be a bit strong!  Like your recent pie, the Pizza Roma pie seems to a denser crumb.  I wonder if that is typical for their place.  Their dough certainly looks pretty hydrated. Maybe 96 hrs is too long and the gluten looses it.  I'm liking 85% HR or so. On the other hand, isn't the "Gabriel" recipe like 70% HR.  That dough certainly looks easier to deal with.

Do you like your blue steel pans? Does one need to cure them somehow like cast iron?

Paul

Paul - I believe that the 70% hydration used in the class recipe is lower than the production pizza so people can handle the dough. On the pans, they are really great. I am doing another bake on Sunday, so I will do a separate thread on their performance with pics.

John

Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #351 on: January 29, 2011, 10:59:49 PM »
I did reheat a slice of the recent pizza I had made Tuesday on Thursday.  I also wanted to see how long the remainder of slices would still stay springy, so I reheated some this evening.  The slices still taste good after 4 days.  I wanted to take a video of how springy the slices were on Tuesday, but I forgot.  Tonight I took a video of how the slices are still springy, if anyone is interested.



Two pictures of slices I reheated, one torn apart.

Norma
« Last Edit: January 29, 2011, 11:04:49 PM by norma427 »
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Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #352 on: January 30, 2011, 07:37:33 PM »
Finally getting somewhere!

John

Offline Jose L. Piedra

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #353 on: January 30, 2011, 07:44:21 PM »
Awe-inspiring. Did you do anything differently from the last one?

JLP
Scarsu d'ogghiu, e riccu di provolazzu ::)

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #354 on: January 30, 2011, 07:50:32 PM »
Awe-inspiring. Did you do anything differently from the last one?

JLP

Jose - I flip-flopped the flour ratio: 75% Golden Haven, 25% Ultimate Performer.

John

Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #355 on: January 30, 2011, 08:44:02 PM »
John,

All of those look wonderful!  Great job.

Norma
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #356 on: January 30, 2011, 09:23:17 PM »
Nice work John.   :chef:

Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #357 on: February 01, 2011, 07:26:19 AM »
From the post Toby (foolishpoolish) did before: http://www.elizabethminchilliinrome.com/2011/01/making-pizza-dough-with-gabriele-bonci.html     the videos show how to open dough and grease pans for pizza in teglia, although it says in these videos (in Italian and English) that Gabriele doesnít grease his pans in the bakery.





For anyone that is interested a video about making focaccia from the same channel on YouTube.

Focaccia di Recco

It is interesting to me how thin the dough is and how easily the dough can be stretched.



Another video of Gabriele Bonci making bread.

Gabriele Bonci (Pizzarium) Making Bread



Norma
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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #358 on: February 01, 2011, 09:03:52 AM »
Your last pies look great John!

Offline malvanova

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #359 on: February 01, 2011, 12:26:32 PM »
 John I'm coming over where do you live,,,, I'm droolling over HERE!!!!!!!!   :chef: :chef: :chef: :chef: :chef: :chef: