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1
Hearth Ovens / Re: FGM 950 B on the way
« Last post by chillcoolcold on Today at 08:44:12 AM »
Live Laugh love
2
New York Style / Re: same methods....different hydration!!!
« Last post by Harborganics on Today at 08:11:40 AM »
After doing many months of experiments on a pizza I called the "Hybrid Reinhart", I thought I had done all I could to come up with a simple, delicious pizza...at least according to my likes.  So, my thought was to try something totally different.... I started with a 62% hydration dough, using the same percentages of yeast, oil, and honey as the "Hybrid Reinhart".

Flour (100%):
Water (62%):
IDY (.5%):
Salt (2%):
Olive Oil (2%):
Honey (2.%):
Total (168.5%):
Single Ball:
1235.62 g  |  43.58 oz | 2.72 lbs
766.09 g  |  27.02 oz | 1.69 lbs
6.18 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 2.05 tsp | 0.68 tbsp
24.71 g | 0.87 oz | 0.05 lbs | 4.43 tsp | 1.48 tbsp
24.71 g | 0.87 oz | 0.05 lbs | 5.49 tsp | 1.83 tbsp
24.71 g | 0.87 oz | 0.05 lbs | 3.53 tsp | 1.18 tbsp
2082.02 g | 73.44 oz | 4.59 lbs | TF = N/A
347 g | 12.24 oz | 0.76 lbs

I added the water, yeast, salt, oil and honey to my Kitchen Aid bowl and whisked together.  I then added the flour (KABF) and used the dough hook in my hand to combine the ingredients very roughly.  Then I mixed the dough on stir for 4 minutes......let the dough rest 5 minutes....and then finished the mixing for 3 minutes on stir plus 1/2.  (This is all taken directly from the Reinhart instructions.)  Finished dough temp was about 82 degrees.  Immediately scaled, balled and refrigerated.  I've used the dough from day 2 to day 7, reballing the dough balls the day before usage, and taking doughs out to warm up 1 to 2 hours prior to baking. 

This dough is even better than the Hybrid Reinhart and it really shows in the texture.  While the pizza is crisp enough to stand out on it's own when holding an edge, the crust yields very easily to the tooth, with no chewiness, and is a delight to eat.
The following is a typical result:
John
Hi John, I am pretty new to the wfo business and I am struggling to find a dough that works for me. Same as you I have been experimenting with different methods, more oil, less oil, no oil etc..
It's a long journey for sure. My problem is being mobile with temperatures as low as 10-15 degr. Celsius and the dough balls just not wanting to stretch or roll out. I do ferment my dough balls for at least 24 hours and seen no way out other then to par bake them the day before we operate. Sometimes that goes really well but other times you pull out the bases from the mobile fridge and they got all dark spots on the base which I think must have to do with being in the fridge overnight..I still like to roll them out on the spot but with the lower temps I am just too scared they won't stretch..
I haven't tried your dough yet and will experiment with it this week to see how that behaves.
I guess ones you find a perfect combo it will all be different when we hit the 35-40 degr. Celsius again in summer. Oh the joys of the never ending journey in search of the perfect dough  :)
Also, it is mentioned just about everywhere cold fermenting in the fridge, does that mean at fridge temps? As my fridge is set on 4 degr. Celsius and a few had said that is too low..?
Love the great pics. I don't often pull them out the oven looking like that and I really want to.
Cheers,
Jack.
3
Neapolitan Style / Re: Home oven issues with baking steel
« Last post by ravishi on Today at 03:35:07 AM »
I don't think I explained my problem well.  I realize 750F is too hot for steel and I know that's why the bottom is burned.  I tried to explain in my original post that I'm looking for alternatives to steel since steel's thermal conductivity is too strong.

 
Fibrament has lower conductivity than cordierite.

Thanks, I saw this as an option but was thrown off by people saying cordierite was superior.  Probably for the same reason as using steel: lower oven temps require higher thermal conductivity.  But if my broiler is strong enough to produce 750F, then steel is not the best option.  Looks like I'll have to try fibrament unless others suggest something else.
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Ask the Dough Doctor / Effect of docking on the cornicione
« Last post by justin541 on Today at 12:49:33 AM »
I had only a Sicilian dough to add to my (I got it) list before I started here.  I have since gotten the help I needed to create a great NY style dough (Thanks Hodgey1) and just recently had an American style that I crafted, and was good with, but still want to perfect.  So far I love my recipe. I got a good rise on the cornicione, but had to pop alot of bubbles after 4 min of baking at 500F.  I understand the cold dough to heat problems. I was just wondering the effects of docking the dough would have. I know it's taboo, but if I did decide to dock the dough, should I dock the cornicione too, or just the center. What effect might this have? I'm using a overnight cold fermentation with 62% hydration, per pound of 13.33% flour. I used 1g IDY, 3g Sugar, 2 gram salt. No oil.  Stirred the ingredients together with a spoon. Ran on speed 2 with j hook till everything looked combined. Autolyse for 30 min. Then turn on speed 2 for 7 min. Check with Lehmann test of chicken egg size portion of dough for flexability. Usually have to go the full 10 min. tighten skin, then off to the fridge, after being patted with paper towel soaked in evoo. After overnight ferment, I take the dough out of the fridge and straight to a floured surface, open the dough, top, bake.
5
Off-Topic Foods / Re: 17 Foods That Aren't Worth Making At Home
« Last post by Jackitup on Today at 12:01:47 AM »
 ^^^ Eggs should be cooked like a good steak....RARE-MED RARE even scrambled, loose and wiggley! :drool:
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Off-Topic Foods / Re: 17 Foods That Aren't Worth Making At Home
« Last post by jkb on Yesterday at 11:54:44 PM »
Hey, hey, don't knock my JP. He's one of the good ones!  :chef:

J/K.  Jacques is the man.  I just really prefer my eggs barely cooked.  I think he probably agrees with me but was just being PC.
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Off-Topic Foods / Re: 17 Foods That Aren't Worth Making At Home
« Last post by Jackitup on Yesterday at 11:34:02 PM »
Jacques has no idea what he's talking about.  The French omelet is way better than the country omelet.  (I don't like eggs that have browned >:()

Hey, hey, don't knock my JP. He's one of the good ones!  :chef:
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Off-Topic Foods / Re: 17 Foods That Aren't Worth Making At Home
« Last post by jkb on Yesterday at 11:25:12 PM »
Pepin is the omelette man.


Jacques has no idea what he's talking about.  The French omelet is way better than the country omelet.  (I don't like eggs that have browned >:()
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Off-Topic Foods / Re: Anova Sous Vide Immersion Circulator
« Last post by Jackitup on Yesterday at 10:42:05 PM »
Went for 22 hours,, could have been a few hours longer. Ended up with toast potato sallad and cole slaw. All and all, chuck was excellent. Flavors were infused right to the center!

jon
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Neapolitan Style / Re: Home oven issues with baking steel
« Last post by Jersey Pie Boy on Yesterday at 10:04:54 PM »
+1 with Craig, Deb and Mitch.. 600+ is a great place to launch on steel in  home oven..You can get an excellent balance of top and bottom.  If you leave that broiler on, you certainly won't be getting actual NP's, but in under 3 mins you'll get a very fine, soft yet chewy, flavorful NP-ish pie..somewhere between NY and NP, but nobody's measuring what the NP score is..just how great it tastes and looks. And it sounds like you already do this  :)
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