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Starters/Sponges / Re: My Poolish Didn't Expand
« Last post by rparker on Today at 11:43:04 AM »
How do you make your speedies? I like to use pork butt marinated in oil, (lots of) vinegar, ranch dressing mix powder, and black pepper.
I had only recently read about them. I've not stopped in Binghamton to try a real one on any trip yet. Not knowing the official preferred flavor, I decided to establish a base flavor with a pre-made bottled. Salamida. one of their other sauces was good, so an easy decision to make.
http://www.spiedie.com/sm.html
The chicken sauce on the far left does a decent job of getting in the neighborhood of Brook's BBQ in Oneonta, NY. (A regional favorite 30 years ago.)

Next time I will find a recipe online and use it for a start.

I diced chicken up and marinated it for 24 once and 36-48 hours the next time.  We all agreed to try pork next. The chicken probably makes for a better sandwich than chunks of pork, though. Did yours get good and soft?

One pork alternative I was thinking about was going Carolina style and do a short sear and longer indirect (both on grill) followed by sealing tight and finishing in oven and then pull it. I don't have a smoker or I'd try that.

Oh, and on the chicken thing, I saved some for a couple stove top experiments just to see what it was like. The pan fried was a bit hit. I like the traditional grilled kabob, but my wife and son dug the pan-fried. I might lose that battle.

I've never done ranch mix on anything. It's good for rubs?
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You learn something new every day, that is good to know.
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Dough Ingredients / Re: Ginger Ale in Dough?
« Last post by steelplayer on Today at 11:18:13 AM »


I read somewhere that some pizza makers replaced all water in a dough formula with soda. That seemed to me to be an excessive amount of sugar, not to mention the greatly increased cost. I concluded that it was unlikely that all of the formula water was replaced by soda.

Peter

Aloha Peter,

I can't speak to whether pizza makers use soda, but I can say from experience in the restaurant industry that using soda probably would not change the cost much if at any.  Most operators are using bag-in-box or cornelius kegs of syrup mixed with water thru a carbonator.  Costs are usually in the 3-4 cent range for a 16 ounce glass.

Tom
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Starters/Sponges / Re: My Poolish Didn't Expand
« Last post by TXCraig1 on Today at 11:06:27 AM »
How do you make your speedies? I like to use pork butt marinated in oil, (lots of) vinegar, ranch dressing mix powder, and black pepper.
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Dough Ingredients / Re: Ginger Ale in Dough?
« Last post by Pete-zza on Today at 10:48:18 AM »
That's really interesting, Peter. What are your thoughts on the impact of the carbonation. I read somewhere that the CO2 lowers the pH of the water. The citric acid would help too. Maybe that ends up like adding vinegar to a pie crust for tenderness.
Jon in Albany,

I really don't have any thoughts on carbonation other than to say that some time ago I tried using carbonated water in pizza dough and I did not detect any major difference in the results. Citric acid is an acidulant that is often used in foods to give them a bit of a tang. It is also used in some chemical leavening systems. So it might have some effect on the dough but I never tested it even though I have some dry citric acid in my pantry.

Peter
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Dough Ingredients / Re: Ginger Ale in Dough?
« Last post by Pete-zza on Today at 10:44:35 AM »
Tom,

Thank you for the analysis.

When I typically work on these kinds of matters, I go to the SelfNutritionData website and look for the item in question. For example, for Sprite, I found this entry: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beverages/3870/2. For a generic ginger ale, I found this entry: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beverages/3863/2.

I read somewhere that some pizza makers replaced all water in a dough formula with soda. That seemed to me to be an excessive amount of sugar, not to mention the greatly increased cost. I concluded that it was unlikely that all of the formula water was replaced by soda.

Peter
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General Pizza Making / Re: Capt. B's pizza journey.......
« Last post by CaptBob on Today at 10:43:58 AM »
If you use the pulse button and keep an eye on it so the meat only gets cut small enough to where it's like it's been ground up and not let it get totally pulverized, you could probably use a food processor in place of a meat grinder.

Might be worth a try John. Thank you!
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The by-products of combustion while corrosive are actually pretty mild when compared to what happens when we introduce a yeast leavened product into the mix. In commercial ovens this used to be a primary concern until we learned how to address the problem. A number of years ago I was in a bakery that was cited for having rust on the inside roof of their oven, to correct the problem they lined the entire oven with stainless steel but neglected to consider that it would be cooler behind all that stainless, the acids condensed behind the stainless and within 18-months completely rusted out the superstructure of the oven, it was a 200-foot long tunnel oven and when the superstructure gave way the oven folded in the middle and with the conveyor still running it was flopping on the floor like a fish out of water, quite a sight to see.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
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Nice!!!  That has been on my hit list, possibly next.   Did you roll up triangles of dough?  My cookbook also shows you that you can make a roll a long filled log and then make slices - same dough, filling, etc. but then they are called "Mini-Schnecken."  Easier production.

Thanks. Hard to see from the photo since each piece has a thick coat of sugar/ground nuts/cinnamon. A piece of dough (made with butter and cream cheese) is rolled out into a rectangle. Fillings (prune lekvar, chopped dates, apricots, roasted nuts, etc.) are spread over the sheet. The sheet is then rolled up into a long cylinder which is brushed with egg wash. Thick slices are cut from the cylinder, dipped into the coating, and placed cut side down on the cooking sheet. Recipe from Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan. I don't care what you call these things, they are amazing with coffee after they have cooled for a few hours. I was never a fan of rugelach until I found this recipe.
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