Author Topic: Cracker crust experiment  (Read 5323 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 1946
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Richmond, VA
    • pizzamaking.com
Cracker crust experiment
« on: January 09, 2004, 08:19:51 PM »
Found what appears to be a good recipe for white soda crackers (a.k.a. saltine crackers).

The recipe looks surprisingly like a pizza dough recipe, but has added baking soda, cream of tartar, and malt syrup.

So, tomorrow night I'm going to double the recipe and make a thin crust pizza out of it!  ;D

I'll post my results when I have them!
Pizzamaking.com is a member-supported public resource. Click HERE to become a Supporting Member.


Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 1946
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Richmond, VA
    • pizzamaking.com
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2004, 08:28:04 PM »
Almost forgot...

The recipe says to roll out the dough very thin (1/16"), then fold it in half, then in half again (4 layers). Roll out thin again and fold, fold. After all of this folding and rolling out twice, then you roll it out for the last time, dock, then bake. I assume the layering of the dough gives the crust its flakey appearence.

Anyway, I'm going to follow the recipe to the letter except it's going to make a pizza instead of a bunch of crackers.

Again, will let everyone know the results on Sunday.
Pizzamaking.com is a member-supported public resource. Click HERE to become a Supporting Member.

Offline Pierre

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 272
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Hamburg, Germany
  • Someone say "PIZZA !!"?
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2004, 11:00:52 AM »
The same method is used for “blaetterteig” or “paper dough” when making "Apple-Strudel". Only that blaetterteig is folded up to 120 times. The dough consists of a layer of fat (usually butter) between 2 layers of dough. Both are chilled and then rolled out, folded and rolled out again, consecutively, until the desired amount of layers are reached. The fat between each layer allows for the separate rise of each dough layer.

The recipe you found just might achieve the results you are looking for, a thin and flaky crust. Let us know what happens. Lot’s of luck.
 :)


Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2004, 01:03:31 PM »

Pierre, it sounds like you are an  experienced Pizza and Pastry maker?

Randy

Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2004, 01:04:03 PM »
Steve did you make the recipe as crackers first?

Randy

Offline Pierre

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 272
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Hamburg, Germany
  • Someone say "PIZZA !!"?
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2004, 07:28:14 PM »
Randy,

my wife is Austrian. I once had seen the traditional hand folded and rolling method performed by a 5 star cook. Commercially sold apple-strudel here in Germany is quite good, it would be hard to achieve the same consistency and quality by hand each and every time. And who would like to fold and roll out the dough to achieve as much as 120 folds...My Wife though has made it a few times and the results were good.

I do though like to make bread and pizza. I have been following Steve's Site for over a year I guess and the Forum since September/October 2003. I just haven't had much time to add my feedback in the past.

Pierre

Offline DKM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1684
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Texas
  • Chicago - Now that's Pizza!
    • The Emperor.net
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2004, 11:19:41 PM »
Well I'm glad you have had some time to post.  Hope to here more from you.

Did I understand correctly that you are in Germany?

DKM
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2004, 07:20:23 AM »
How did it come out Steve?

Randy

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 1946
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Richmond, VA
    • pizzamaking.com
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2004, 07:34:19 AM »
Doughs are still rising... pizza is tonight.

My first dough is the experiemtal "soda cracker" recipe. It called for lots of shortening and butter (2 T. each using only 2 cups of flour). I substituted more shortening for the butter since I didn't want a buttery crust (4 T. shortening).

For my second crust, using DKM's scaled down Pizza Inn recipe, I decided to experiement and add 1 t. baking soda to see what that might do to the finished crust.

Both pizzas are for dinner tonight. I'll post the results as soon as I have them!  ;D
Pizzamaking.com is a member-supported public resource. Click HERE to become a Supporting Member.

Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2004, 07:44:33 AM »
Take pictures if time permits. ;D

Randy


Offline DKM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1684
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Texas
  • Chicago - Now that's Pizza!
    • The Emperor.net
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2004, 10:03:45 AM »
Yes please, pictures if possible.

I really want to see the difference if possible.

DKM
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Pierre

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 272
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Hamburg, Germany
  • Someone say "PIZZA !!"?
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2004, 06:20:59 PM »

Did I understand correctly that you are in Germany?

DKM

Yes DKM, that's correct. I live in germany since 1982 now. Before that I lived in New York and Florida. I'll try to contribute to the forum when & where I can.

Pierre

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 1946
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Richmond, VA
    • pizzamaking.com
Re:Cracker crust experiment
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2004, 08:59:40 AM »
Ok, since the forum was offline yesterday, here's the result of my pizza experiment.

As you know, I made two pizzas on Sunday. One using DKM's scaled down "Pizza Inn" recipe and the other using a "Soda Cracker" recipe out of a breadmaking book that I have.

To DKM's recipe, I added 1 tsp. of baking soda to see how it would affect the texture and taste of the crust. Results: The crust had good flavor, but its texture was all wrong. No flakiness at all. It reminded me of melba toast, although not nearly as hard and crunchy.

The "Soda Cracker" crust was the real winner here. It had a light and flakey crust with distinct layers (somewhat croissant like). Both my wife and I loved this crust, although it was too thin in my opinion. I am going to attempt this recipe again and make the crust a little thicker. I'll post the exact recipe later tonight. But, for now here's what I remember: bread flour, water, vegetable shortening, yeast, salt, baking soda, cream of tartar, and malt syrup.

To make the dough, I followed the directions by rolling it out into a large thin sheet, then I folded it in half, and then in half again. I repeated this procedure several times. Then I docked, sauced, and topped the pizza. I used a cutter pan and baked at 500 degrees F. on the lowest rack in my oven. I think 500 degrees was a little too hot, since the bottom started to burn before the toppings were cooked. Next time I'll try 450.

All in all, I really liked this crust. I loved the distinct layers and the flakiness. I am pretty sure that all the folding was the key here.  ;D
Pizzamaking.com is a member-supported public resource. Click HERE to become a Supporting Member.


 

pizzapan