Author Topic: Tonights pizza  (Read 9666 times)

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Offline Randy

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Tonights pizza
« on: July 09, 2004, 07:29:19 PM »
Went back to 12 min of kneading on the old KitchenAid and went back to 120-130F water.  The higher temp water gets you the big bubbles in the crust.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2004, 07:29:44 PM by Randy »


Offline Randy

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2004, 07:30:57 PM »
Cooked on a screen for 8 min, no stone.

Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2004, 09:45:10 PM »
is that still with an overnight rise?
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Offline Randy

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2004, 06:28:06 AM »
Over night rise, then flattened, divided in half and reshaped into balls for a two hour rise before super.
Tasty!
Randy
« Last Edit: July 11, 2004, 07:14:20 AM by Randy »

Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2004, 10:26:05 PM »
Love the bubbles. ;D
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Offline DKM

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2004, 10:34:14 PM »
Looks really good.


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Offline Randy

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2004, 01:39:35 PM »
I noticed when the Papa Johns people put the sauce on the pizza they stop say 2" from the outside edge of the crust.  I think I will try this next time.

Randy

Offline canadave

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2004, 05:02:06 PM »
Randy,

The distance between the outer crust edge and the start of the sauce is purely a personal preference variable, based on how much you like sauce and whether or not you like that last part of the crust to be pure dough or not :)  I personally like sauce a lot, so I end mine pretty close to the edge (around an inch or less.)

Dave

Offline Randy

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2004, 05:47:33 PM »
I like the sauce also and probably use more than I should but it is wonderful stuff.  In the pictures above you can see how the outer crust is stained even though I did not put any on the outer ring.  When the pizza rises in the oven, it will pull from the flat section and roll outwards, that is the reason for not going to the outer ring if that makes sense.  It makes for a more uniform outer crust appearance.

Randy

Offline canadave

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2004, 10:11:47 PM »
ah, interesting...I use a thinner crust (about 1/4 inch), so I don't notice that effect as much.


Offline DKM

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2004, 10:29:34 PM »
I like the sauce also and probably use more than I should but it is wonderful stuff.  In the pictures above you can see how the outer crust is stained even though I did not put any on the outer ring.  When the pizza rises in the oven, it will pull from the flat section and roll outwards, that is the reason for not going to the outer ring if that makes sense.  It makes for a more uniform outer crust appearance.

I had noticed that before, but had never really thought about the reason for it.

As long as it taste good  ;D
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Offline Les

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2004, 01:04:00 AM »
. . . went back to 120-130F water.  The higher temp water gets you the big bubbles in the crust.

I'm curious about that.  Do you know why that is so?

Offline Randy

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #12 on: July 13, 2004, 07:25:47 AM »
Les I follow the directions on the back of SAF perfect rise yeast package which reads, heat the liquid to 120F-130F and add that to half of the flour and other dry ingredients then I mix for 2 minutes.  The higher temperature water raises the dough temperature higher than it would if I used 70 deg water.  The higher temperature kneaded dough allows for greater yeast growth in the cooler and therefore more bubbles.
I had changed my directions to those Reinhardt suggest in his latest pizza cookbook but have gone back to my old directions because I like the bigger bubbles.

Randy

Offline Les

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #13 on: July 13, 2004, 10:28:49 AM »
Les I follow the directions on the back of SAF perfect rise yeast package which reads, heat the liquid to 120F-130F and add that to half of the flour and other dry ingredients then I mix for 2 minutes.  The higher temperature water raises the dough temperature higher than it would if I used 70 deg water.  The higher temperature kneaded dough allows for greater yeast growth in the cooler and therefore more bubbles.

Excuse me if I seem a little dense but do you let the yeast develop in the water first with a little sugar?  If so, do you reheat it back to 120° before adding it to the flour?

Offline Pizzaholic

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2004, 10:57:36 AM »
add that to half of the flour and other dry ingredients then I mix for 2 minutes.  The higher temperature water raises the dough temperature higher than it would if I used 70 deg water.  

Randy
When do you add the other half of the flour? After the mix for 2 minutes?
Pizzaholic
Is it on the instructions, I admit that I havent read the package yet. I have been doing it the PeterR way.

Offline Randy

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2004, 11:16:37 AM »
Mix together the salt and the flour. Pour half the mixture in the old KA mixer, add one packet SAF perfect rise yeast, set mixer to “Stir”.  Mix 120-130F water with the sugar, and honey in my case, then pour water mixture into running mixer.  Mix for two minutes while scraping the sides. Stop mixer and add the rest of the flour and Crisco or oil.  Stir until you want get a flour bath then set to knead speed 2.  On high gluten, flour 12 minutes works for me.  Remove from mixer and hand-knead with minimal flour until a ball can be formed.  Place in cooler overnight.  
I still like Rinehart’s method but I prefer a bigger bubble structure.
Randy

Offline pizzabill

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #16 on: July 14, 2004, 07:59:36 AM »
When I was trained at Pizza Hut, they told us to sauce to about 1 inch from the edge of crust, but more importantly, to use the cheese to "tie" the sauce to the crust by overlapping them both.

We always had "bottom cheese" and "top cheese" the bottom cheese was placed in a circle around the edge of the sauce to tie it to the crust, none on the sauce  in the middle of the pie. Then the toppings were placed, then top cheese was sprinkled over everything. This really worked to keep everything from sliding into the middle during baking/eating. I still tie my toppings to my crust edge this way!
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Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #17 on: July 14, 2004, 12:19:02 PM »
cool tip bill thanks..... ;D
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Offline Les

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2004, 10:19:46 PM »
Les I follow the directions on the back of SAF perfect rise yeast package which reads, heat the liquid to 120F-130F and add that to half of the flour and other dry ingredients then I mix for 2 minutes.  The higher temperature water raises the dough temperature higher than it would if I used 70 deg water.  The higher temperature kneaded dough allows for greater yeast growth in the cooler and therefore more bubbles.
I had changed my directions to those Reinhardt suggest in his latest pizza cookbook but have gone back to my old directions because I like the bigger bubbles.

Randy, I wanted to thank you for this tip.  Today I used 130° temp water, and my dough acts like it is possessed.   Attached is a pic of my dough after a couple of hours in the fridge.

Offline Randy

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Re:Tonights pizza
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2004, 07:18:49 AM »
Your welcome Les.  I put mine into the coller as soon as the kneading is complete then let ir rise overnight.

Randy