Author Topic: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.  (Read 24542 times)

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Offline Serpentelli

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #140 on: September 18, 2013, 11:38:01 AM »
This is my favorite one.

I could eat that twice a day, every day, not get bored with it, and probably live to be 115 years old as a direct result of eating that pizza twice a day.

Great job!!!

John K


Offline meatboy

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #141 on: September 19, 2013, 03:03:59 AM »
awesome pie!

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #142 on: September 19, 2013, 09:02:04 AM »
Isn't the sauce beautiful on that pie. And the way the cheese melts gently into the sauce without an abrupt edge... love it.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline Serpentelli

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #143 on: September 19, 2013, 11:18:00 AM »
Yeah,

The sauce is almost caramelized in some places (like a Sicilian) and wet in others. And those cheese dollops look like little quail eggs or something. AND the oil. AND the basil. AND the cornicione.

Any digital enhancement going on there, fornographer?

Not asking as a dig, just wondering in terms of what I am aspiring to.

John K
« Last Edit: September 19, 2013, 12:22:47 PM by Serpentelli »

Offline Mmmph

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #144 on: September 19, 2013, 11:37:25 AM »
Agreed...That cheese and sauce look is what I strive for with every margherita. The Blackstone I'm using tends to brown/burn the cheese too much.
So many pizzas are baked in the Blackstone and shown here on PM.com..IMO, they're flawed with these brown spots.
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Offline Serpentelli

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #145 on: September 19, 2013, 12:24:16 PM »
Also,

I think I just heard that pie say something that sounded like "Do not cut me into slices"...

John K

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #146 on: September 19, 2013, 12:30:10 PM »
 :)   Thank you all.   


@Serpentelli, heheh, no photoshopping on the picture.  Shot with my Canon 5d MKIII and applied a filter that emulated film in Lightroom.  More about the pie:


1.  Sauce:  La Squisita San Marzano tomatoes.   Went through hand cranked food mill (one of those cheap oxo ones from bed bath and beyond) using coarse filter.  I like my sauce with a lot of the tomato flesh still intact.   I just poured the entire can into the food mill.  No salt, sugar, oregano, olive oil.  Just the contents of the can.  To me this brand is a tad bit sweet.  I use this sauce for my sourdough pies and I use Cento Italian for the CY pies.  But this was the only type I had in the kitchen when I was ready to bake.   


2.  Cheese:  Fattorie Garofalo bufalo mozzarella from Costco.  This cheese just melts the way I like it.  It's very creamy and doesn't seize up in a bad way when the pie gets cold.  Relative to the other bufalo mozzarella, it was a good value.  :) I am going to learn how to make my own mozzarella soon.   


3.  Dough:  San Felice Flour (50% blue bag/50% red bag. red bag is for long fermentation).  I mixed it by hand very gently.  I used ice water (cold enough to make your hand a bit numb).  It barely window-paned when I set it for an hour of bulk fermentation.  Most of the gluten developed in the many hours it balled fermented in my kitchen.   As I mentioned originally, I backed way down on the hydration because I wasn't sure how long I was going to be out before being able to bake.  Turned out we got home a bit too early and the dough could have used a couple or so more hours of fermentation.  I think I prefer overfemented dough to underfermented.


Oh yeah, nowadays, I put a lot of olive oil on the pies before launching into the oven.  I think the brand of olive oil I am using is San Giuliano.  It's cold pressed and has a very fruity fresh flavor. 


One of these days, I'll get a video of my bake and/or mixing. 


You can do it too!  It just takes lots of practice and mistakes. 
« Last Edit: September 19, 2013, 12:31:59 PM by fornographer »

Offline Barnstable

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #147 on: September 19, 2013, 01:58:16 PM »
Hi Fornographer,

Lovely Margherita. As already commented, the sauce and cheese melt is striking. It maybe the camera but the sauce appears such a deep red. Do you apply it in the swirl technique leaving a ridge at the rim or just spread to cover with a spoon. I think I`m a fan of the basil under the cheese.

Regards,

Barnstable

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #148 on: September 19, 2013, 06:27:52 PM »
Hi Fornographer,

Lovely Margherita. As already commented, the sauce and cheese melt is striking. It maybe the camera but the sauce appears such a deep red. Do you apply it in the swirl technique leaving a ridge at the rim or just spread to cover with a spoon. I think I`m a fan of the basil under the cheese.

Regards,

Barnstable


Yes, I just apply the swirl method with a ladle.  It's a relatively dry dough (58%) so I put a lot of sauce.  The sauce looks like that because there's a lot of tomato flesh that was still relatively intact. 

Offline crkoller

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #149 on: December 12, 2013, 05:58:58 PM »
Love seeing the evolution, I am about to start what I can only hope to be as successful of a journey. Do you have a CY to IDY conversion? I can never end up using the CY and the IDy is so much easier to store. I also have a homemade starter that I use for bread, but it sounds like trying the Ischia starter at some point in the future might be worth it?

Thanks,

Chris


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #150 on: December 12, 2013, 06:42:00 PM »
Do you have a CY to IDY conversion? I can never end up using the CY and the IDy is so much easier to store.

Chris,

See http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm. In general, and as a rule of thumb, you use one third of the weight of the cake yeast to get to IDY. For ADY, it would be a half.

Peter

Offline crkoller

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #151 on: December 12, 2013, 09:42:36 PM »
Thanks Pete!