Author Topic: Nearlypolitan  (Read 50524 times)

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #240 on: June 04, 2012, 10:31:55 AM »
Thanks Craig!

Of course I need to "refine" my technique and understanding of how everything works. Someone pointed out that I used a low protein flour, not really good for pizza, and that's why I got this kind of result - so I'll try to find the perfect flour.

My aim is not to get the browning actually, but a white pizza with leoparding and black bubbles (the way I like it!).

The broiler was glowing red but not always - so what do you suggest as oven test? preheat the stone as MAX TEMP (500F) and then leave it under 400F to make the broiler kick in?

thanks again, I will make other tests and post the results here!

ciao,

Dario


There are others much more experienced here than I when it comes to using the home oven. Hopefully they will chime in. Otherwise, I'd experiment to see how hot you can get the oven where the broiler will still stay on full blast for the entire bake time.

I've made plenty of pies with AP flour. You don't need high protein. Caputo 00 Pizzeria is not particularly high. It's about the same as most AP if I remember correctly.

These are typical of the pies I made with AP flour when I was baking on my modified BBQ. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13475.0.html

CL
Pizza is not bread.


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #241 on: June 04, 2012, 10:42:26 AM »
You should also read through this whole thread if you have not already done so: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11654.0.html

Jackie Tran (real name is Chau) is as good as it gets. Also, starting here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11654.msg181796.html#msg181796, David Deas describes his thoughts on getting the most out of the home oven with simple modifications and makes some pretty awesome pies.

Craig
Pizza is not bread.

Offline jak123

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #242 on: June 05, 2012, 09:16:07 PM »
A mod that i did, and it works really well:

I went to my local machine shop and had my guy cut a piece of black steel plate, 1/4" or 3/16" (cant remember) to the exact size of one of my oven racks. The thing heats up and really stays hot. Season it like you would a cast iron pan on first use. I love it.

but be careful, i kept it too high in the oven on upper rack and it got so hot that it fried the circuit boards under the burners, why wolf range put them there is beyond me, but i consistently get the oven high enough to crank out 2-3 minute pies.

Offline weissblut

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #243 on: June 06, 2012, 11:36:59 AM »
Thank you all guys, I'll try again this friday.

Some things I want to try, but I'd need your opinions:

1. Sticking with a 65% hydration of the dough, what do you think of overnight fermentation IN THE FRIDGE? I've heard someone suggest it to create a better flavour and retain more bubbles inside the dough... also, it is worth it to use plastic wrap when leaving the dough/dough balls fermenting? Someone said to me that this will help the air stick inside too.

2. My oven has a "vent" option, which will turn on a vent inside it to make the air circulate. I've heard that in this way the heat is higher, for 2 reasons, 1st - air circulates and heats better everywhere, 2nd - you trick the sensor in believing that there is a lower temp. I'll try with the vent this friday, but do you have any feedback on this?

3. Grill. Don't remember where I read that keeping the temp lower (around 440 degress) when turining on the broiler/grill works better because the grill will stay on for a longer time (of course the oven must be preheat at max degrees to heat up the stone, but lowering it down of a few degrees would help the stone to "stabilize").

any other suggestion?

thanks in advance, I hope to get you better pictures soon!!!


Offline ringkingpin

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #244 on: June 06, 2012, 11:42:42 AM »
I do a ferment in the fridge if it's too warm to do one overnight in my house.  No problem doing it in the fridge, just make sure that you give the balls enough time to warm up to fully proof.  I always use plastic wrap around the bowl for my bulk to make it air tight.  I also keep the balls in air tight or nearly airtight containers.
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are."
 Brillat-Savarin

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #245 on: December 11, 2013, 05:45:28 AM »
I finally gave the Nearlylolitan style an honest effort. I used 10% protein AP flour, 63% hydration, 3% salt and 3% of my stiff sourdough starter. Bake time 1:40ish on soapstone 2 3/4" under the broiler. This dough was not nearly in its prime; it really needed another 3 h or so on the bench. I opened this dough using NY dough handling technique, and I think it shows (flat cornicione). I learned some things for sure.
Il miglior fabbro

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #246 on: December 11, 2013, 08:16:18 AM »
Looks great, Johnny!  Seeing this makes me want to try again  :)
Mary Ann

Offline JD

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #247 on: December 11, 2013, 09:20:59 AM »
Was this your first try? That looks great Johnny... I wish I had your oven. I tried about 5-6 times a few months ago and realized my broiler is just not cut out for the job.
Josh

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #248 on: December 11, 2013, 09:35:33 AM »
Mine won't do it either.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #249 on: December 13, 2013, 09:04:11 AM »
Was this your first try? That looks great Johnny... I wish I had your oven. I tried about 5-6 times a few months ago and realized my broiler is just not cut out for the job.

Thanks JD. My oven is nothing special; but it's been with me for a few years and I've learned how to harness the most out of it.  In the past, I've set out to make a "Nearlypolitan", but never with as much thought behind it as recently.  I've never had anything that remotely resembles leoparding before.
Il miglior fabbro


Offline JD

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #250 on: December 13, 2013, 09:56:57 AM »
In the past, I've set out to make a "Nearlypolitan", but never with as much thought behind it as recently.

Care to share those thoughts?
Josh

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #251 on: December 13, 2013, 10:28:11 AM »
Care to share those thoughts?

Sure thing. You see, in the past I've used some NY doughs, topped with italian peeled tomatoes and fior di latte, with a stone or steel plate positioned around 2 3/4" from the broiler, hoping to get a "Nearlypolitan", but I found out it's just not that simple. 

After reading up on this thread, as well as Omid's epic Pizza Napoletana post, I felt like I had some better ideas for the next attempt. I made a dough with less hydration than my usual 66% with AP flour, dialing it down to about 62-63%. I eliminated sugar and oil from the formula. I incorporated a bulk RT rise for approximately 15 hours, followed by another 5.  I "closed off" the bottom 2/3 of my oven, using only the uppermost part (top rack), which was covered with a double layer of aluminum foil, therefore creating a smaller volume of space to heat.  Just these small changes (incorporating a "proper" dough formula and oven arrangement) made for some welcome changes. Slowly but surely I'll be doing some more tweaking to achieve a better, balanced bake.
Il miglior fabbro

Offline JD

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #252 on: December 13, 2013, 11:50:23 AM »
Thanks for sharing Johnny. A couple follow up questions if you don't mind:

Does your oven have a top heating element, or just a broiler?
Is your thermostat in the top 1/3 of the oven or below the false floor?
Any idea what temps you are working with in this new configuration?
What yeast are you using to achieve a 20 hour room temp ferment?



Josh

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #253 on: December 13, 2013, 12:00:29 PM »
Thanks for sharing Johnny. A couple follow up questions if you don't mind:

Does your oven have a top heating element, or just a broiler?

My electric oven has a bottom heating element (1200 watts) and a top heating element (1200 watts). Not sure if it's technically correct, but sometimes I refer to the top heating element as the broiler.

Is your thermostat in the top 1/3 of the oven or below the false floor?

My thermostat is located in the top 1/3, tucked right behind the soapstone,yet not touching.

Any idea what temps you are working with in this new configuration?

That's a very good question, but unfortunately I'm unable to answer. I'm sure others with more experience with home oven baked nearlypolitans can chime in with solid estimates based on the bake time - which is right around 1:40.

What yeast are you using to achieve a 20 hour room temp ferment?

I'm using fresh compressed yeast.


You're welcome JD! Hope this helps.
Il miglior fabbro

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #254 on: December 14, 2013, 04:23:40 PM »
Snapped a couple pics with my cell phone of this afternoon's attempt.  1:50-2:00 bake time for each pie. Just sauce, whole milk mozz and EVOO.
Il miglior fabbro

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #255 on: December 14, 2013, 04:36:36 PM »
Snapped a couple pics with my cell phone of this afternoon's attempt.  1:50-2:00 bake time for each pie. Just sauce, whole milk mozz and EVOO.
Mr. Johnny.....daaaang!!  :drool:
That is exactly the type of pizza I wanna make when I grow up.....how'd you do that man?!!   ;D
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #256 on: December 14, 2013, 04:57:17 PM »
Mr. Johnny.....daaaang!!  :drool:
That is exactly the type of pizza I wanna make when I grow up.....how'd you do that man?!!   ;D

Thanks Mr.Bob! I briefly outlined how I'm attempting these nearlypolitan bakes (formula and oven set up) a couple posts up. For this batch I used 10% protein AP flour, 2% salt,  ~.2% compressed yeast. 4 hour RT bulk, 18h refridgerated rise, 2 hours on counter, balled + 4 hours on the counter. I didn't plan on doing it this way, but life got in the way, hehe. BTW- the 2nd pie had sauce over the cheese, the first pie was sauced then cheesed. Does this verb exist- cheesed?
Il miglior fabbro

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Nearlypolitan
« Reply #257 on: December 14, 2013, 05:21:28 PM »
Thanks Mr.Bob! I briefly outlined how I'm attempting these nearlypolitan bakes (formula and oven set up) a couple posts up. For this batch I used 10% protein AP flour, 2% salt,  ~.2% compressed yeast. 4 hour RT bulk, 18h refridgerated rise, 2 hours on counter, balled + 4 hours on the counter. I didn't plan on doing it this way, but life got in the way, hehe. BTW- the 2nd pie had sauce over the cheese, the first pie was sauced then cheesed. Does this verb exist- cheesed?
Cheesed exist?.....it does now Gent! 
Ya'll must have that magic flour over there Johnny. :chef:
Thanks for the work flow bro.  8)
« Last Edit: December 14, 2013, 05:23:06 PM by Chicago Bob »
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