Author Topic: Grind Your Own Flour?  (Read 3780 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21285
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2010, 08:58:30 PM »
Toby,

I had a call back from the representative at the other mill.  Talking to him was very interesting.  He said they didnít carry wheat berries, but would check what the prices would be for a bag. 

I know they do all their grinding at this mill.  It is a small mill.  I then asked him about what other kinds of flour they grind.  He mentioned corn meal, barley flour and possibly soon buckwheat.  He also said they milled Ethiopian Flour.  I asked him what that was.  He said it was from African Grass Seed.  I asked him more, because I have never heard of this kind of flour.  He then said since there is a large Ethiopian community around here they do a fair amount of milling that kind of flour.  Did you ever hear of using this kind of flour?  I then asked him if I could purchase some and try it and he said, yes.  I wonder how this kind of flour would act?  He then explained that they make this kind of sour-like fermented pancake and use it to eat their food, without utensils.  I thought very interesting.

I copied this off the web, what this kind of flour is.

The preferred staple in the Ethiopian and Eritrean diet is engera (pronounced en-jer-a, and sometimes spelled injera), a flat sour-like fermented pancake that is used with "wot", a stew made with spices, meats and pulses, such as lentils, beans and split peas. In Ethiopia and Eritrea, teff is the most common cereal crop used to make engera. Teff is a tiny, round, khaki-colored grain closely resembling millet. Its scientific name is Eragrostis, teff. "Teffa", the Amharic word for "lost", is so named because of teff's small size. It is the smallest grain in the world and often is lost in the harvesting and threshing process because of its size.

http://dev.ethnomed.org/ethnomed/cultures/ethiop/teff.html

http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/recipe-injera.html

http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/activity-gluten.html

                        
The representative said they are looking to try a new approach to milling flour and have it on their drawing board.  It is something going back in time and doing things the old way.  He said they used to first bake the wheat berries and then grind them.  Did you ever hear of this method?

I told him when he finds out about the wheat berries, I would like to talk to him further about both of these flours.

Thanks,

Norma 
Always working and looking for new information!


Offline Matthew

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2228
Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2010, 06:06:27 AM »
Hi Norma,

I just realized that my mixer (Magic Mill Assistent) has an optional Grain Mill.  It may be worth considering if you're in the market for a new mixer.

Matt

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21285
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2010, 06:19:33 AM »
Matt,

Thanks for the advise.   :)  Wish I was getting some kind of mixer in the future, but I guess for now I will just mix by hand or with my Hamilton Beach.
Still searching if I really want to try grinding my own flour for home use.  It's just an idea for now.  ::)
It would be something to play around with. 
When I talked to the miller he said there is somewhere that a homemaker is trying roasting the wheat berries and then grinding them with great results.

Thanks,

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!