Author Topic: Grind Your Own Flour?  (Read 4820 times)

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Online norma427

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Grind Your Own Flour?
« on: January 24, 2010, 03:11:45 PM »
Has anyone tried grinding their own flour for making pizza?  Warren (UnConundrum), talked about people that grind flour for making their bread, yesterday at the Artisan Bread Making Demo.
If anyone has tried this, what kind of equipment did you buy?
This subject sounds interesting.

http://hubpages.com/hub/Grind-flour

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/homest/  look at grinding your own wheat

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/homest/msg0620312821416.html

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/2149/grinding-your-own-flour-where-do-you-buy-grain

Thanks,

Norma


Infoodel

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2010, 03:19:30 PM »
Has anyone tried grinding their own flour for making pizza?  Warren (UnConundrum), talked about people that grind flour for making their bread, yesterday at the Artisan Bread Making Demo.
If anyone has tried this, what kind of equipment did you buy?
This subject sounds interesting.

http://hubpages.com/hub/Grind-flour

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/homest/  look at grinding your own wheat

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/homest/msg0620312821416.html

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/2149/grinding-your-own-flour-where-do-you-buy-grain

Thanks,

Norma
Strange you should mention this. I'm thinking about embarking on this in the next few weeks. I've spoken with a flour mill which is happy to sell me wheat berries by the kilo - that way I'd know the wheat was suitable for milling (aged long enough, strain of wheat etc.) Simple whole wheat or maybe high-extraction to start with. I'm not about to start sifting large quantities of flour to obtain white flour. The potential for mess is too great - plus from what I've read of others' experiences,  the yield of white flour and effort required from whole grain just doesn't make sense on a domestic scale.

Toby
« Last Edit: January 24, 2010, 03:25:28 PM by Infoodel »

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2010, 04:00:15 PM »
Strange you should mention this. I'm thinking about embarking on this in the next few weeks. I've spoken with a flour mill which is happy to sell me wheat berries by the kilo - that way I'd know the wheat was suitable for milling (aged long enough, strain of wheat etc.) Simple whole wheat or maybe high-extraction to start with. I'm not about to start sifting large quantities of flour to obtain white flour. The potential for mess is too great - plus from what I've read of others' experiences,  the yield of white flour and effort required from whole grain just doesn't make sense on a domestic scale.

Toby

Toby,

I was just thinking about this idea to try here at home to make bread or pizza.  I have a flour mill near me, that still grinds some of their own flour for wholesale.  I have purchased from them for years.  They used to have an old mill where all the original kinds of grinding equipment was. I used to watch them have a hopper, that the flour went in and then into the flour bags, a machine was used by hand to stitch up the bag.  The original mill was always quite dusty with flour. They still had their own grinding wheels on display that they used years, ago. They are now in a new facility. 
When Warren talked about getting a grinder to grind your own flour, I think he said they were expensive.  There was one lady there that said she ground all her flour. 
If you decide to grind your own flour, let me know what kind of equipment you needed to buy.  I will look on ebay and the internet to see what might be needed at the least price. 

Thanks,
Norma

Infoodel

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2010, 04:14:53 PM »
Toby,

I was just thinking about this idea to try here at home to make bread or pizza.  I have a flour mill near me, that still grinds some of their own flour for wholesale.  I have purchased from them for years.  They used to have an old mill where all the original kinds of grinding equipment was. I used to watch them have a hopper, that the flour went in and then into the flour bags, a machine was used by hand to stitch up the bag.  The original mill was always quite dusty with flour. They still had their own grinding wheels on display that they used years, ago. They are now in a new facility. 
When Warren talked about getting a grinder to grind your own flour, I think he said they were expensive.  There was one lady there that said she ground all her flour. 
If you decide to grind your own flour, let me know what kind of equipment you needed to buy.  I will look on ebay and the internet to see what might be needed at the least price. 

Thanks,
Norma
Norma, flour mills are not that expensive (or needn't be). You can get a small manual one for as little as $50.
The volume of grain you want to process, fineness of grind (everything from v. fine to coarse grind etc.) and desired flour are big factors, I think.  I'm hoping to find an electric one (or manual with the ability to motorise later) for small(ish) volumes. I'll let you know what I find. I've noticed some of the popular models in the US aren't available here in the UK.
Toby

Cheers,

toby

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2010, 04:35:48 PM »
Toby, Norma,  have a look at this machine,  the nutrimill.  I think it is one of the most popular and best reviewed as far as a home miller goes.  I almost ordered one recently,  but decided to hold off for now,  as getting the grain shipped is my only option.  Until that changes,  I may not get into it. -marc

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2010, 04:38:42 PM »
Norma, flour mills are not that expensive (or needn't be). You can get a small manual one for as little as $50.
The volume of grain you want to process, fineness of grind (everything from v. fine to coarse grind etc.) and desired flour are big factors, I think.  I'm hoping to find an electric one (or manual with the ability to motorise later) for small(ish) volumes. I'll let you know what I find. I've noticed some of the popular models in the US aren't available here in the UK.
Toby

Cheers,

toby

Toby,

I will let you know what I find in types of grinders, also.  There is another mill near me that still grinds their own flour, cornmeal and other things.  When I was in the funnel cake business, I had called them and they gave me free bags to try.  I will contact them this week to see what they have to offer.

Thanks for your help,

Norma

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2010, 04:42:37 PM »
Toby, Norma,  have a look at this machine,  the nutrimill.  I think it is one of the most popular and best reviewed as far as a home miller goes.  I almost ordered one recently,  but decided to hold off for now,  as getting the grain shipped is my only option.  Until that changes,  I may not get into it. -marc

http://www.kitchenresource.com/

widespreadpizza,

Thanks for the information.  I will look around to see where nutrimill can be purchased at the best price.

Norma


Infoodel

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2010, 04:43:41 PM »
Toby, Norma,  have a look at this machine,  the nutrimill.  I think it is one of the most popular and best reviewed as far as a home miller goes.  I almost ordered one recently,  but decided to hold off for now,  as getting the grain shipped is my only option.  Until that changes,  I may not get into it. -marc

http://www.kitchenresource.com/
Thanks Marc - yeah that was one of the models I was looking at - and unfortunately I don't think I can find them here in the UK. 
For folks in the UK interested in a mill, this website seems to offer a wide range. I'm thinking about going for the 'Jupiter' model http://www.grain-mills.co.uk/

Toby

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2010, 05:17:15 PM »
Toby,

I have an old food grinder that has many attachments.  I think I am first going to try this out if I can get some wheat berries or something like you mentioned..  Ebay sells these new and says they are for wheat grinding.  Any thoughts?  Under this article it mentions Burr grinders.  I guess they are talking about something like an old food grinder. 
Before I decide if I really want to pursue this and buy a better grinder, I think will give this a shot.
I gave the old food grinder a shot at grating mozzarella and it worked for that.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9961.0.html

http://www.internet-grocer.net/grinders.htm

Norma


Offline charbo

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2010, 06:36:27 PM »
If you want to sift bran from the flour, I wouldnít recommend a Nutrimill.  Impact (micronizer) mills generate a grind that is too uniform.  There are other negatives.  However, they can mill very finely and quickly and are not expensive.

For sifting bran, get a stone or burr mill.  I use a Retsel Mil-Rite and can very quickly remove about a quarter of the bran with a #16 strainer.  However, for the hobbyist to get a completely refined flour is problematic.

A comparison of manual mills can be found here:
http://www.grainmillcomparison.com/2009_07_01_archive.html

There is much more info about home mills at The Fresh Loaf.

Iíve only used the Mil-Rite; but, from what Iíve read about mills, one gets what one pays for.



Offline meline cyrille

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2010, 06:43:22 PM »
ciao desole je ne suis pas sur le bon post mais comment se presentť a vous ????

Infoodel

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2010, 06:56:55 PM »
Thanks for that tip Charbo.
I definitely want the option of sifting bran - so stone or burr mill is going to have to be the way.

And yes TFL is a good place to get info on milling - that's where I got a few recommendations for suitable mills.

There's no way I'm going to get a reasonable amount of super white flour from home milling and I'm pretty much resigned to that. Eventually, I'd like to achieve something similar to T80 or 'farine bise' flour if possible.

Toby

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2010, 07:03:44 PM »
charbo and Toby,

Thanks for the additional information.   Will have to check into all of this.  :)

Norma

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2010, 08:34:57 AM »
Toby,

Is this some of the wheat berries you were talking about?  I contacted the one supplier and here is what they wrote back. 

We sell Golden 86 Hard Wheat berries in 50# bag for $29.10.

Thanks for your help,

Norma

Infoodel

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2010, 12:21:49 PM »
Toby,

Is this some of the wheat berries you were talking about?  I contacted the one supplier and here is what they wrote back. 

We sell Golden 86 Hard Wheat berries in 50# bag for $29.10.

Thanks for your help,

Norma

Yep. They would work. Here's a link about them on TFL:
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/1995/walton-feeds-golden-86-wheat

You might also want to check out Wheat Montana:
http://www.wheatmontana.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=22&products_id=169
(you may already be familiar with their flour products)

The golden 86 is allegedly superior to hard red wheat in terms of flavour.

Toby

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #15 on: January 25, 2010, 12:39:31 PM »
Toby,

Thanks for the additional links.  :)  They are interesting.  I did call the other mill and will wait for their call back to see if they also have wheat berries for sale or other products.

Thanks,

Norma 

Offline pcampbell

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2010, 01:25:33 PM »
I have a bit of a dumb question here....

I would like to look into this also.   They sell mill attachments for KitchenAid mixers.

There is a place in NY state near New Paltz (sort of) that sells locally grown organic wheat berries, called http://www.wildhivefarm.com/

If you grind your own wheat berries, this is going to be whole wheat flour yes?    White flour is just the endorsperm, is that correct?  How do they get the endosperm separated from the bran and germ....  ?
Patrick


Infoodel

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #17 on: January 25, 2010, 01:35:40 PM »
I have a bit of a dumb question here....

I would like to look into this also.   They sell mill attachments for KitchenAid mixers.

There is a place in NY state near New Paltz (sort of) that sells locally grown organic wheat berries, called http://www.wildhivefarm.com/

If you grind your own wheat berries, this is going to be whole wheat flour yes?    White flour is just the endorsperm, is that correct?  How do they get the endosperm separated from the bran and germ....  ?
To separate out the bran and germ, as I understand it, you have to stone/burr mill the grain (not impact - since that will create more equally sized particles of bran/germ/endosperm) - which will then allow for sifting (sifting out coarser bran and germ). I believe it's done in stages.
That said, I personally wouldn't try to get a fine white flour from a home-milling setup. From what I've read of others' experiences - it's not worth it.

Toby


Offline UnConundrum

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2010, 08:49:17 PM »
Sorry I didn't respond right away Norma, haven't had time to hang out here lately.  I've actually been thinking of a manual mill, the Country Living Grain Mill (http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/country_living_mill.aspx) that I might connect to a motor.  It's American made which is a good thing, and a lot of people have great things to say about it.  Also, I want the manual capabilities should we go without power for a bit.  It's not cheap by any means, but I understand it is VERY well made.

Also, you should be aware of the issue of aging flour.  I'm just learning as well, but I think you can use flour right away, OR you have to age it for a while.  I believe it has to do with the enzymes.

As to wheat berries, you heard me mention Echo Hill at Fred's.  They carry Spring hard wheat at a very reasonable price.  When I looked I was actually surprised.  It was less than $.70/pound, by the pound, and they always offer a discount if you buy a bag (same with KA flours).  That is less than several online sources I've looked at and there is no postage.

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #19 on: January 26, 2010, 09:05:43 PM »
Sorry I didn't respond right away Norma, haven't had time to hang out here lately.  I've actually been thinking of a manual mill, the Country Living Grain Mill (http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/country_living_mill.aspx) that I might connect to a motor.  It's American made which is a good thing, and a lot of people have great things to say about it.  Also, I want the manual capabilities should we go without power for a bit.  It's not cheap by any means, but I understand it is VERY well made.

Also, you should be aware of the issue of aging flour.  I'm just learning as well, but I think you can use flour right away, OR you have to age it for a while.  I believe it has to do with the enzymes.

As to wheat berries, you heard me mention Echo Hill at Fred's.  They carry Spring hard wheat at a very reasonable price.  When I looked I was actually surprised.  It was less than $.70/pound, by the pound, and they always offer a discount if you buy a bag (same with KA flours).  That is less than several online sources I've looked at and there is no postage.

Warren,

The Country Living Grain Mill looks very nice.  I don't think I want to spend that much, until I know more about grinding flour. 
I forgot about you mentioning Echo Hill at Fred's.  I didn't have time in the last few days to go over the notes I took.  That price sounds good. 

Thanks for the information,

Norma

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2010, 08:58:30 PM »
Toby,

I had a call back from the representative at the other mill.  Talking to him was very interesting.  He said they didnít carry wheat berries, but would check what the prices would be for a bag. 

I know they do all their grinding at this mill.  It is a small mill.  I then asked him about what other kinds of flour they grind.  He mentioned corn meal, barley flour and possibly soon buckwheat.  He also said they milled Ethiopian Flour.  I asked him what that was.  He said it was from African Grass Seed.  I asked him more, because I have never heard of this kind of flour.  He then said since there is a large Ethiopian community around here they do a fair amount of milling that kind of flour.  Did you ever hear of using this kind of flour?  I then asked him if I could purchase some and try it and he said, yes.  I wonder how this kind of flour would act?  He then explained that they make this kind of sour-like fermented pancake and use it to eat their food, without utensils.  I thought very interesting.

I copied this off the web, what this kind of flour is.

The preferred staple in the Ethiopian and Eritrean diet is engera (pronounced en-jer-a, and sometimes spelled injera), a flat sour-like fermented pancake that is used with "wot", a stew made with spices, meats and pulses, such as lentils, beans and split peas. In Ethiopia and Eritrea, teff is the most common cereal crop used to make engera. Teff is a tiny, round, khaki-colored grain closely resembling millet. Its scientific name is Eragrostis, teff. "Teffa", the Amharic word for "lost", is so named because of teff's small size. It is the smallest grain in the world and often is lost in the harvesting and threshing process because of its size.

http://dev.ethnomed.org/ethnomed/cultures/ethiop/teff.html

http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/recipe-injera.html

http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/activity-gluten.html

                        
The representative said they are looking to try a new approach to milling flour and have it on their drawing board.  It is something going back in time and doing things the old way.  He said they used to first bake the wheat berries and then grind them.  Did you ever hear of this method?

I told him when he finds out about the wheat berries, I would like to talk to him further about both of these flours.

Thanks,

Norma 

Offline Matthew

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2010, 06:06:27 AM »
Hi Norma,

I just realized that my mixer (Magic Mill Assistent) has an optional Grain Mill.  It may be worth considering if you're in the market for a new mixer.

Matt

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Re: Grind Your Own Flour?
« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2010, 06:19:33 AM »
Matt,

Thanks for the advise.   :)  Wish I was getting some kind of mixer in the future, but I guess for now I will just mix by hand or with my Hamilton Beach.
Still searching if I really want to try grinding my own flour for home use.  It's just an idea for now.  ::)
It would be something to play around with. 
When I talked to the miller he said there is somewhere that a homemaker is trying roasting the wheat berries and then grinding them with great results.

Thanks,

Norma


 

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