Author Topic: Turkish Pizza - Lahmacun?  (Read 8061 times)

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Offline tzoavva

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Re: Turkish Pizza - Lahmacun?
« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2010, 06:53:24 AM »
Glad I came across this topic.  I haven't had a Lahmacun or lahmajun as I know it in a while.  I have eaten it in Turkey were I thought it was originally from but years later and with the internet I think I read they are in fact from Armenia.  Also I have eaten them in Greece.  The pictures above from Norma are great to let folks see what they look like you can normally find those in your local international stores that sell Greek/Turkish/Arabic foods.  I always say I will buy them sometime but always skip out of doing so...anyway so not sure how those ones taste.

You will see the dough is like a very think pita (no pocket by the way on True Greek Pitas :P ) and in Turkey I found theirs were topped with spices that are pressed on to the dough.  Actually the one I hate the Turkish family that I was staying with made the spices themselves and took it to the bakery where the took the toppings and put it on their dough (flattend out thin as well) cooked it and the family would go later on and pick it up.  Not that it takes a long time to cook but my guess is the bakers fix first their breads then the ovens turn down and then they bake other things (such as food in pans taken to them by families and Lahmajuns).  They used to do that in Greece too where food was taken to the Bakery but not sure if they do that still....haven't seen my family take any food to them on my recent trips.  Anyway the Greek version I had was in a local Souvlaki shop (aka Gyro shop) where their interpretation of lahmajun was very very spiced up ground meat my guess is lamb or combo lamb and beef that was press in a ball shape that was pressed on flat onto the pita bread and it was grilled both sides on the charcoal grill.  That one was rolled up and served plain or like a gyro with onion/tomato/tzatziki.  No comparison with a Gyro in taste appearance what so ever but the meathod the same.  The Turkish one I had was cut in slices kind of like a pizza or in squares and eaten as an appetizer.

Bill and Chris your pics have inspired me to try this out so thanks for the reminder of something I loved and have had many years to taste.  I will try to post back results when I try it out.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2010, 06:55:08 AM by tzoavva »


Offline norma427

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Re: Turkish Pizza - Lahmacun?
« Reply #21 on: March 03, 2010, 07:30:31 AM »
tzoavva,

Thanks for your post and saying you are going to try this Lahmacun.  It will be interesting to see what your results are.

I am that familiar with Lahmacun, but was wondering if it anything like Injera (Ethiopian Flat Bread) I read about this kind of bread on the web and wondered if anyone knows what the difference is.  ::)

This is what I read off the web and what it had to say about making Injera.

I gladly refer you to Mary for the full recipes for this dinner, she has step by step pics to make
 injera and if you wish to present your family with a -tr-additional Ethiopian meal she has even more things to make. The butter mixture is wonderful btw!

About teff; the first bag I grabbed from the health food store turned out to be a ready mix, consisting of all kinds of different non-gluten flours and baking powder. It is still in the pantry. The next bag was the one I was looking for: brown all teff flour, in Holland it's a very very finely ground flour contrary to the flour Mary used I think.
To get a headstart on the starter (dŰh) I used two tbs of a very active sourdough I had somewhere in the back of my fridge. Fed it with teff and off it went. Very lively, but with a teenage tendency to slump, frown, and roll eyes when confronted with authority... in other words, quick to bubble, quick to form the liquid brown on top. Another thing that comes to mind when looking at the evolving starter is quicksand.

Baking injera is easy.... if only I could get used to NOT flip the darn things over! Very confusing, I've been baking pancakes since I was 12 and all of a sudden I have to think while baking. I guess every other pancake was flipped. Sorry Injera!

(Sourdough Bereketei dough)
Ah yes...the secret ingredient? It's present in the other dishes as well, the bread I made with it is called Sourdough Bereketei and I'm not entirely sure this is going to be a hit, (it smells good though). On it's first rise it went crazy, doubled in an hour. Second rise equally good and then.... no ovenspring! Nothing. Like a 70's girl on the beach, just lie there and get a tan. Tap me on the shoulder when I need to turn.
Later!

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline tzoavva

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Re: Turkish Pizza - Lahmacun?
« Reply #22 on: March 03, 2010, 07:23:39 PM »
Norma,

Did some research to actually see what Injera is and I wouldn't say they are the same or close.  I have eaten once Ethiopian wow spicy food might add.  And from what I gather this is their staple bread that is also used to allow them to grab their foods since most of it is hand food like meals.  From what I remember eating of it and kind of mainly that because evertying was spicy it is light and very pliable kind of like a crepe imagine.  Didn't see any eggs added to it from some recipes I just looked up....but the concept texture is light and pliable like that but more sturdy to grab things.  Also the recipe indicates they fry it.  Lahmajun or Lahmacun is more dense and thicker and it holds up more and is crispier like a pizza to allow it to lay stay somewhat flat if lifted.  Think of it like a very thin thin pita bread or even cracker style pizza for that matter.

Here is a link on youtube on how it is made by an Armenian which somewhat describes what I was referring to in my prior post between how the Greek and Turkish version was. 
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDHXLs8U1bQ" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDHXLs8U1bQ</a>


I need to write down here ingredient list and compare it with the one above to see which one I think my taste bud would like.  but I have to say the earlier pictures are awesome mmmm mouth watering as I type :)  OK could that I am hungry and haven't had supper yet .....

Offline norma427

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Re: Turkish Pizza - Lahmacun?
« Reply #23 on: March 03, 2010, 09:00:04 PM »
tzoavva,

Thanks for doing the research and telling me the difference between Injera and Lahmacun.  I enjoyed watching the video of how to make the Lahmacunís.  The ingredients really sound tasty. 

Good luck on trying the Lahmacunís,  :)

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline hyefatman

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Re: Turkish Pizza - Lahmacun?
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2010, 04:44:20 PM »
update from a armenian

lahmajoon is an armenian food-  served hot 
you can add lemon and plain yogurt
(which is also armenian (madzoon)
yogurt= turkish word
madzoon=armenian
most of the info on the board is correct   but i would add
that the crust can best be described as a flour tortilla without
the lard taste    baked until crispy  unless you like it soft
most of the commercial meat is now beef  but it should be
ground lamb   during lent the meat is removed and a mushroom
creation can be used

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: Turkish Pizza - Lahmacun?
« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2010, 07:59:16 PM »
Nice another Armenian on here, I feel at ease now :-D


 

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