Author Topic: Contamination question  (Read 862 times)

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Offline CAPSLOCK

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Contamination question
« on: February 01, 2010, 08:48:06 PM »
Hi folks! I have a couple of starters a local one (I'm in the S.F. Bay Area) and the Italian culture from sourdo.com, I use them regularly and usually have one or both active at any given time. I also use IDY quite a bit in my kitchen as well as we have tons of wild yeast, enough in fact that it was super easy for me to develop my wild sourdough culture in a short period of time. My concern is that my Italian culture will get contaminated by all of the other yeasts present in my kitchen, and I really like that culture.

My protocol is this, I keep my mother culture in my fridge and when I want to build a poolish I pull out the cold culture feed it and place it in my proofing box, when it's really kicking I divide it and place the mother in a clean jar and place it in the fridge, then take the rest of the culture and build it up to the volume that I need. What are the chances that my culture will become contaminated with the IDY that is everywhere in my kitchen? Are there any steps I can take to avoid contamination, or is my protocol enough to insure that my culture will remain uncontaminated?


Offline Crider

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  • Location: Northern California
Re: Contamination question
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2010, 01:07:54 PM »
Commercial baker's yeast can't survive in an acidic environment of a sourdough culture. It's the lactobacillus which is a big variable -- whatever bacilli prefer the cold refrigerator environment are likely what's dominant in your starters.

Offline CAPSLOCK

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Re: Contamination question
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2010, 03:26:16 PM »
Commercial baker's yeast can't survive in an acidic environment of a sourdough culture. It's the lactobacillus which is a big variable -- whatever bacilli prefer the cold refrigerator environment are likely what's dominant in your starters.

Cool thanks, I reckon this is why things turn out best when I do hybrid doughs...


 

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