Author Topic: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes  (Read 4021 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« on: February 04, 2010, 09:29:51 PM »
I know that our members are always on the lookout for interesting pizza recipes to try. I recently found an interesting collection of recipes and ideas from sunset.com, at http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/kitchen-assistant/easy-homemade-pizza-recipes-00400000062188/. There are several contributions from well-known pizzerias, including Pizzetta's, Delfina's, Emilia's and Tony Gemignani. For a preview of the photos of the 14 pizzas, see http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/kitchen-assistant/easy-homemade-pizza-recipes-00400000062188/page17.html.

Peter


Offline Bob1

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2010, 11:07:21 PM »
Pete,
Thanks, a lot of good stuff there

Bob

Offline norma427

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2010, 12:25:24 AM »
Peter,

Thanks for the link and photos.  I like the looks of the Bianca Pizza.  It reminds me of a white pizza.  That is something I want to try.

Norma
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Offline Essen1

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2010, 12:25:59 PM »
Peter,

Thanks for the link. I went over the Delfina recipe and noticed that the salt and water contents must be off or a misprint. So I decided to take a look at the "Comments section" and sure enough, people had the same problems.

Check it out...

http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/techniques/how-to-make-pizza-00400000063306/comments-index.html
Mike

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2010, 01:14:50 PM »
Mike,

Thanks for the link. If the Kosher salt, at 3 T, is the Diamond Crystal brand, then the salt usage based on 30 ounces of flour comes to about 3.6%. If the Kosher salt is the Morton's brand, then the salt usage is about 5.1%. Those numbers are too high. If three teaspoons of salt is intended, the salt usage is about 1.2% for the Diamond Crystal brand and about 1.69% for the Morton's brand. I would say that 3 teaspoons is perhaps what was intended. And the Morton's brand of Kosher salt is perhaps closer to what Delfina's has in mind even though the Diamond Crystal salt at about 1.2% should also work. What the commenters said about the poor quality dough is accurate what is I would expect at 3.6-5.1% Kosher salt. No doubt, our members would have suspected that something was wrong with the salt amount in the recipe, just as you did.

I believe that the water is given in the proper amount. According to November's Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/, two cups plus one tablespoon of water comes to about 17.2 ounces. On the basis of 30 ounces of flour, that is a hydration of about 57.4%. That is in line with the rated absorption value for the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour. However, it is a few percent on the low side for a typical all-purpose flour.

One commentor felt that the salt was out of order in the dough preparation process. I believe that the late addition of the salt may have been intentional. I believe that an autolyse-like rest period was intended before adding the salt. In the classic autolyse, both the yeast and salt are left out of the autolysed dough but some people add the yeast on the theory that it will take a while for the yeast to commence fermentation and won't acidify the dough to any material degree. However, using fresh yeast, that is perhaps less true because it does not require any rehydration. But, I can't be too hard on Delfina's for this. The autolyse process is often misapplied and misused, even by professionals.

Peter

Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2010, 12:02:02 PM »
I dunno Peter, it seems to me since he's all about "00" flours in a 550 oven he should read this post, as should anyone about to attempt these recipes.

In your own words...
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg88260.html#msg88260
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2010, 01:10:38 PM »
Jim,

Remember, this dough is fermented at room temperature for several hours at a warm room temperature. I don't know how much one teaspoon of fresh yeast weighs (I have read estimates all over the place), but apparently it is enough to get a decent rise in the dough over a several-hour period. I estimate that the total dough weight for the recipe is around 48 ounces, for 6 dough balls of around 8 ounces each. Each dough ball is used to make a pizza that is 11"-12". Those sizes correspond to a thickness factor of about 0.084 (for the 11" size) and 0.071 (for the 12" size). When I had 00 flour on hand I used to fairly regularly make 10"-12" pizzas within one hour, from start to finish. I used a lot of yeast, water as hot as I could safely use it, and I used a food processor to knead the dough and my proofing box at around 120 degrees F, all while my pizza stone was being preheated. The pizzas were soft and very tasty but the crusts were on the light side. I suspect the pizzas made using the Delfina dough should exhibit similar crust characteristics and will also have light-colored crusts. The Delfina dough also contains some oil, about 0.80%, which should also help soften the crust a bit. I did not use any oil with my one-hour pizzas.

With recipes like the Delfina dough recipe, you just have to give it a try to see what you end up with.

Peter

Offline Essen1

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2010, 11:12:58 PM »
Quote
I suspect the pizzas made using the Delfina dough should exhibit similar crust characteristics and will also have light-colored crusts.

Peter,

I think Delfina's pies are more of a hit and miss kind of thing when it comes to coloration. Just look at the pics.

But what I'd like to know is where you got the 0.80 % oil info from? They guard their recipe pretty well.

Mike

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2010, 09:19:08 AM »
But what I'd like to know is where you got the 0.80 % oil info from? They guard their recipe pretty well.

Mike,

One and a half teaspoons of extra virgin olive oil (or essentially any oil for that matter) from the Delfina dough recipe weighs about 0.24 ounces. So, 0.24/30 = 0.80%.

Peter

Offline NY pizzastriver

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2010, 10:27:46 AM »
Peter, Oh ok, so "00" flour is ok to use as a room temp rise, not a cold ferment at 550. I don't really do any room temp rises, Jerry Mac aside...but that's been months, but maybe I'll try one someday. My thoughts on the whole thing has basically become there's one great formula out there, Glutenboys. At 550 KABF works, and there's no all trumps here, so my quest for additional greatness is over/stopped until I get a way to go to 650 temps. And quite frankly I'm pretty happy with the GB at 550, so I'm not really "striving" to find a way to get to 650 anytime soon.

Mike, the first pizza in those pics looks absolutely awful! I think it must be called the "Delfina Carrie Special".

 :-D

Peace all, thanks for all the help, and happy Pizza.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2010, 10:40:05 AM by NY pizzastriver »
"If God said you can come to heaven now, but you have to stop eating my pizza, you'd stay and finish instead, right?" - Essen1


Offline Guyver

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2010, 11:12:06 AM »
Peter,

I think Delfina's pies are more of a hit and miss kind of thing when it comes to coloration. Just look at the pics.

But what I'd like to know is where you got the 0.80 % oil info from? They guard their recipe pretty well.



Wow That looks pretty good! In the first picture, which pizza is that? I never saw that one before.
If you love eating pizza, you'll love making pizza!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2010, 11:54:27 AM »
I recently decided to try a variation of the Emelia’s dough recipe as given at http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=1955931.  I decided to use this recipe mainly because the dough is based on using a preferment (more on this below) and because the dough could be made and used the same day. It had also been a long time since I last used all-purpose flour and this gave me a reason to use it again.

The two major changes that I made to the recipe were to halve the recipe to make dough for only one pizza (12”) and the second change was to substitute IDY for fresh yeast, which is no longer sold in supermarkets near me.

As is often the case when trying out new dough recipes recited in volume measurements, I also struggled with the Emilia's dough recipe. The first obstacle was that the amounts specified for the flour and water suggested a hydration of over 80%, which is considerably higher than the rated absorption value for all-purpose flour. Since no weight was given for the flour, and since I had no way of knowing what was intended with the recipe, I decided to assume that the flour is measured out Textbook style, and to let the chips fall as they may. As most members know, the Textbook method of flour measurement entails stirring the flour in its container (like a flour bag), lifting the flour into the measuring cup(s) with a scoop or ordinary tablespoon to the point of overflowing, and then leveling off the flour with a straight edge (such as the flat side of a standard kitchen knife). For the water, I measured it out by volume while the measuring cup was on a flat surface and viewed at eye level. I then weighed the water.

Based on the above approach, I came up with the following profile for the Amelia’s dough recipe, as I halved it for my purposes. Since I was using the King Arthur all-purpose flour, my numbers were based on that flour.

Total Emilia’s Dough Formulation
King Arthur All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (82.3529%):
IDY (1.3888%):
Sea Salt (0.91199%):
Total (184.65369%):
153 g  |  5.4 oz | 0.34 lbs
126 g  |  4.44 oz | 0.28 lbs
2.12 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.71 tsp | 0.24 tbsp
1.4 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.25 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
282.52 g | 9.97 oz | 0.62 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation

Preferment
King Arthur All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (136.956%):
IDY (2.30978%):
Total (239.26578%):
92 g  |  3.25 oz | 0.2 lbs
126 g  |  4.44 oz | 0.28 lbs
2.13 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.71 tsp | 0.24 tbsp
220.13 g | 7.76 oz | 0.49 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: Water was at 50 degrees F

Final Mix
Preferment (from above):                                                  220.13 g | 7.76 oz | 0.49 lbs
Remaining Total Formula King Arthur All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Total Formula Salt (2.28745%):
61 g  |  2.15 oz | 0.13 lbs
1.4 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.25 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
Total Dough Weight:                                                         282.52 g | 9.97 oz | 0.62 lbs

As can be seen from the above, the preferment cannot technically be called a “sponge”. It can’t even be technically called a “poolish”. If anything, it is a poolish-like preferment. However, at a hydration of 136.96%, that meant that the preferment would bubble after 4 hours of prefermentation at room temperature (at 64.4 degrees F in my case) but that it would be more frothy than a classic poolish. And, such was indeed the case. There were more bubbles at the end of the prefermention than at the beginning, and there was a significant volume expansion, but the bubbles were largely disguised by the frothy character of the preferment.

When time came to prepare the Final Mix, I ran into the second major obstacle. The instructions call for kneading the final dough for 25-30 minutes. My first reaction was that maybe such a long knead time was to fully develop the gluten while making such a high hydration dough capable of handling without sticking to one’s hands. Although the instructions did not give any hint about the purpose of the 25-30 minute knead time, the method is one that I have seen described for doughs with hydrations of close to 100%. After five minutes of kneading, I saw that little was happening to the dough other than being sloshed around by the dough hook. So, to get a workable dough, I found it necessary to add more flour, to the tune of 43 grams. While I did not re-do the profile given above, I calculated that the total formula hydration was 64.29%. That was still high for an all-purpose flour but it was not that far out of line and consistent with prior efforts in which I have been able to achieve around 65% hydration for such a flour.

The final dough, which had a finished dough temperature of 70.8 degrees F and a weight of 311 grams, was allowed to ferment at room temperature (67 degrees F) for four hours, by which time the dough had more than doubled in volume. I shaped the dough to a 12” size as instructed (the dough was a bit extensible but easy to handle), docked it using a dough docker, and then pre-baked the 12” skin for two minutes on a pizza stone that had been placed on the middle oven rack position and preheated for about an hour at around 525 degrees F. During the pre-bake, the crust developed a few large bubbles but I simply pierced them with the tip of a sharp knife when I removed the crust from the oven. I then dressed the pizza with the cheese and toppings and finished the bake on the pizza stone, about 7 more minutes, at which time the crust had developed a nice brown color. I thought the pre-bake was a pretty good idea since it allowed me to leisurely dress the pizza without fear that the pizza would stick to the peel.

A photo of the finished pizza, which shows the finished crust, can be seen at Reply 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10176.msg91645.html#msg91645. The crust had very nice color, both top and bottom, and was chewy at the rim and crispy from the rim to the center. From a thickness standpoint, the pizza had a thickness factor of 0.0970. The flavor of the crust was good but not exceptional despite the use of the preferment as I elaborated it as discussed above. In this case, the star of the show was the toppings and the flavors they imparted to the pizza. Also, I found the crust not to be salty enough. So, next time, irrespective of how I might modify the Emilia’s dough recipe to achieve improved performance, I would use more salt. I also think that using bread flour in lieu of all-purpose flour should also work well with the recipe.

As noted above, I did not rework the profile for the dough I made. However, I can do so if anyone is interested, with or without the salt increase.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 01, 2010, 12:42:40 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline norma427

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2010, 05:00:03 PM »
Peter,

I find how you decided to make this Emelia’s dough recipe interesting since you used a poolish- like preferment.  In your description of how you went about making the dough, finding out how to mix the dough, adding the extra flour, and then pre-baking the crust so the dough wouldn’t stick to the peel all tell you are an experienced dough maker. If you try this dough recipe again, with modifications, I would be interested in hearing how it went.

Your Jamaican Jerk Chicken did look delicious.  :)  All those ingredients sound good in a combination for a pizza.  Did you take any rim shots of the finished pie?

Thanks for the detailed description of the dough and the finished pie,

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2010, 05:28:42 PM »
Norma,

It's a shame that the Emilia's dough recipe was unclear or faulty since we don't know what results we should get. I played around with all kinds of weights for the flour and could not come up with values that would pass muster as a sponge or poolish. So, I concluded that the term "sponge" was loosely used, not a technically precise characterization. I could reconstruct the recipe to any number of preferment versions but there would be no way to tell which is like what was intended with the recipe.

The photos shown at Replies 26/27 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,704.msg91701.html#msg91701 are representative of the photos I took. The ones still in my camera are like the ones in Replies 26/27. The rim of the pizza was well defined but the crumb wasn't all that open and airy. I was using the middle oven rack position, as called for by the instructions to the recipe, so it is possible that there wasn't enough bottom heat to produce a better oven spring. Also, the pre-bake no doubt limited the oven spring by causing the skin to set, even though it was in the oven for only two minutes. The dough before forming was soft and billowy. I could have eliminated the pre-bake step but my practice when trying a new dough recipe for the first time is to follow the instructions as carefully as possible. The advantage of the pre-bake is that it made it easy to dress the pizza at a leisurely pace without worrying about the skin sticking to the peel and particularly with a lot of toppings (I estimate the pizza weighed about two pounds). It was very easy to re-load the pizza into the oven. It slid right off the peel.

I ate more of this pizza than normal, so that was a good sign that I really liked the pizza.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2010, 06:01:56 PM »
Peter,

Thanks for the explanations.  I didn't go down far enough to see your last 3 pictures of your pizza.  :-[
It's good to hear you really did enjoy this pie.  :)

Norma
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Offline Essen1

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2010, 10:58:45 PM »
Here's my take on a home-style Delfina pie...

Mike

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #16 on: March 03, 2010, 11:19:36 PM »
Mike,

The pizzas look pretty darn good. How did they taste? And did you use the Delfina'a dough recipe and, if so, what flour did you use?

Peter

Offline Essen1

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Re: Sunset.com: 14 great homemade pizza recipes
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2010, 01:08:52 PM »
Peter,

Thanks.

I made those pies almost a couple of weeks ago from the recipe that was posted by you. I made some adjustments and tried to convert the recipe into Baker's Percent but I'm not sure if the numbers were very accurate. I wrote down the numbers but can't find the notes anymore. I'm sure they are here somewhere and if I find them I'll post them. The pizzas tasted good, however.

The flour was the Pillsbury bleached AP. One tip of advice on this flour. I have been through two bags so far and it is possibly the worst flour I have ever worked with. To get the skins to open it took quite some time. I have made several batches, one even last night, and had to resort to using a rolling pin on a couple of them to get them to the desired size without tearing. To me, that flour is a nightmare.



Mike

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