Author Topic: My first attempt  (Read 4693 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #50 on: February 25, 2010, 05:45:26 PM »
The amount of water that I have read that should be used to rehydrate ADY is about four or five times the weight of the ADY. I just eyeball it and use a small amount of the formula water without weighing it.

Peter


Offline Bob1

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #51 on: February 25, 2010, 05:54:42 PM »
Pete,
I never really use ADY anymore.  Someone commented about not proofing it all.  Does that really work?

Thanks,

Bob

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #52 on: February 25, 2010, 07:28:37 PM »
Someone commented about not proofing it all.  Does that really work?

Bob,

Yes, it does work but you have to be careful because using nonrehydrated ADY can really slow down the fermentation process. It is a neat application if you want the dough to last several days longer than usual. Also, if you try to use the dough after say, a couple of days, you are likely to be disappointed because two days of fermentation will not be enough to get a functional dough that will yield a finished crust that has decent flavor and good texture. You can see an example of what I am talking about and where I used ADY in nonrehydrated form at Reply 48 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg64308.html#msg64308. If I were a Papa John's or a Domino's, or any other commissary-based pizza operator who wants to keep deliveries to stores to twice a week, I think I would use the nonrehydrated ADY and instruct workers to allow sufficient time for the dough balls to ferment before using.

I normally don't recommend that ADY be used without rehydration because someone is likely to think that it is appropriate to use it that way all the time. For normal applications, my advice is to rehydrate it.

Peter

Offline Bob1

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #53 on: February 25, 2010, 07:39:55 PM »
Thanks Pete, I'll have to try it sometime.

Thanks,

Bob

Offline dms

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #54 on: February 25, 2010, 09:51:43 PM »
Bob,

Yes, it does work but you have to be careful because using nonrehydrated ADY can really slow down the fermentation process. It is a neat application if you want the dough to last several days longer than usual. Also, if you try to use the dough after say, a couple of days, you are likely to be disappointed because two days of fermentation will not be enough to get a functional dough that will yield a finished crust that has decent flavor and good texture. You can see an example of what I am talking about and where I used ADY in nonrehydrated form at Reply 48 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg64308.html#msg64308. If I were a Papa John's or a Domino's, or any other commissary-based pizza operator who wants to keep deliveries to stores to twice a week, I think I would use the nonrehydrated ADY and instruct workers to allow sufficient time for the dough balls to ferment before using.


You'd get better, more consistent results using lower levels of IDY.  Activity of un-rehydrated ADY varies an awful lot. 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #55 on: February 25, 2010, 10:24:13 PM »
You'd get better, more consistent results using lower levels of IDY.  Activity of un-rehydrated ADY varies an awful lot. 

dms,

Can you elaborate further on the variations that are incident to the use of unrehydrated ADY?

I did try using a small amount of IDY (0.14%), also in the context of a Papa John's clone dough, as described in Reply 2 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg58197.html#msg58197, so your point is something that perhaps ought to be considered. Previously, I had used the unrehydrated ADY in a NY style dough formulation, as described in Reply 35 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg37060.html#msg37060. Both of those experiments were to see what effect the unrehydrated ADY would have on the longevity of the two doughs. As I am sure you know, ADY has more dead yeast cells than IDY, some of which cells "entomb" live yeast cells, so I theorized that it would take longer to penetrate the dead yeast cells to activate the live ADY cells. I did not do enough tests to draw any conclusions other than were reported.

Peter

Offline dms

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #56 on: February 25, 2010, 11:49:09 PM »
The problem with putting un-rehydrated ADY in dough is that the amount of time it takes to activate the yeast is variable.  So is the distribution of yeast grains through the dough (they're not likely to be uniformly distributed), as is the fraction of the yeast that will actually activate.  (Something like 10% of ADY by volume is dead, but lots depends on storage and handling conditions). 

If you're making bread at home, that's not a big deal: you can wait more or less time.  for a commercial operation, it's a problem.  (There are encapsulated yeast products used in frozen doughs; I wopnder if they're adaptable to fresh, delayed fermentation doughs.) 

Offline Bob1

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #57 on: February 26, 2010, 08:14:15 AM »
DMS,
Thanks for the insight.  I never knew much about the ADY even though I used to use it.  I would guess that for a cold home ferment it would then multiply and distribute well after a few days.   

Thanks,

Bob

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My first attempt
« Reply #58 on: February 26, 2010, 09:52:49 AM »
When I experimented with long, room-temperature fermented doughs, as discussed, for example, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7225.0.html, I used very small amounts of IDY, as low as 0.0449% (1/256 of a teaspoon, based on 9.36 ounces of flour). In the beginning, I actually rehydrated the IDY in a small amount of water because I was concerned that the IDY wouldn't be adequately dispersed throughout the flour and dough. But later I discovered that it didn't really matter. I found that I could just stir the trivial amount of IDY into the flour and I would get good dough performance. I never tried the same experiment using ADY but it would be interesting to see what the results would be from such an experiment. I think I would wait until summer to conduct such an experiment because my kitchen is too cool in the winter to make long fermented doughs of the best quality.

I might add that I was told that one of the major commissary-based pizza chains uses/used the ADY delayed fermentation method. However, I have not been able to confirm whether that is true.

Peter