Author Topic: Regina Pizzeria  (Read 7882 times)

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Offline bakerbill

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Regina Pizzeria
« on: February 27, 2010, 03:22:02 PM »
Has anyone tried to reverse engineer Regina Pizza that comes out of Boston?  Or does anyone know the recipe? 

bakerbill



Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2010, 03:38:15 PM »
this thread is from way back,  but i believe member pizza shark used to work there.

 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3736.msg31160.html#msg31160

interesting though,  they just opened one in the food court in my local mall.  the slice box I took out dfrom there a couple weeks ago reads regarding the crust.  "since 1926 our secret dough recipe has used a special natural yeast and is aged to perfection".   I do think thier crust is very good,  but I have never heard that they used what a sourdough starter?  -marc

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2010, 08:56:46 PM »
According to the Pizzeria Regina website at http://www.reginapizzeria.com/locations.php?area=all, there are now 17 Pizzeria Regina locations. There are also three Polcari's restaurants that also sell Pizzeria Regina pizzas. Both companies are managed by Boston Restaurant Asociates, Inc. In 2006, BRAI became controlled by a private equity firm (Dolphin). In a 2006 filing with the SEC, at http://google.brand.edgar-online.com/EFX_dll/EDGARpro.dll?FetchFilingHTML1?ID=4700524&SessionID=wjfWWqvBON0Hwl7, BRAI described the Pizzeria Regina pizzas as follows:

The Pizzeria Regina restaurants feature the Company’s premium Neapolitan style, thin crust, brick oven pizza. This pizza features a proprietary dough and pizza sauce, which the Company believes combine to produce a distinct flavor and superior pizza. These pizzas are offered with a wide variety of fresh vegetable and cured meat toppings. The Company believes that the premium quality of its pizza, a result of a proprietary ingredient mix and baking process, provides appeal to both the lunch and dinner markets. The original Pizzeria Regina, located in Boston’s historic North End, has served the Company’s premium brick oven pizza since 1926.

Elsewhere in the abovereferenced SEC document, there is this statement:

The Company maintains a commissary where pizza dough is produced for the Company’s restaurants. The dough preparation requires a high degree of consistency that would be more difficult to maintain at the individual restaurant locations. The Company believes that close, centralized monitoring of the dough preparation ensures a more consistent premium product.

Based on the last statement, I think it would be a challenge to make a commissary dough for 20 restaurants that is based solely on a natural yeast if, by "natural yeast", we mean a natural sourdough. I wouldn't be surprised if commercial yeast is also used. It may even dominate the dough from a fermentation standpoint. Maybe the natural yeast is a commercial formulation that includes sourdough-like flavors like lactic acid. See, for example, http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/nutrition.jsp?id=1575.

Peter


« Last Edit: March 01, 2010, 09:34:19 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline bakerbill

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2010, 07:16:32 PM »
Peter,

Thanks very much for the information about Regina Pizza. It was invaluable.

bakerbill

Offline bakerbill

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2010, 07:21:57 PM »
Peter,

I just found a note that I had received a while ago from someone who talked with a Regina Pizzeria employee.  What kind of yeast?  Anheuser Busch brewer's yeast. What kind of flour? Industry high-gluten flour from Archer Davis Midland (ADM).

bakerbill

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2010, 10:13:43 PM »
I just found a note that I had received a while ago from someone who talked with a Regina Pizzeria employee.  What kind of yeast?  Anheuser Busch brewer's yeast. What kind of flour? Industry high-gluten flour from Archer Davis Midland (ADM).


bakerbill,

That is interesting information. I wonder where one would buy Anheuser Busch brewer's yeast. Maybe one of our beer brewing members will know.

On the flour, I believe you meant Arthur Daniels Midland rather than Arthur Davis Midland. ADM offers four high-gluten flours, Regal, Cavalier, Hi-Rise and Gigantic. Basic information on these flours is given at http://www.adm.com/en-US/Milling/Flour/USWheat/Pages/Regal.aspx, http://www.adm.com/en-US/Milling/Flour/USWheat/Pages/Cavalier.aspx, http://www.adm.com/en-US/Milling/Flour/USWheat/Pages/Hi-Rise.aspx and http://www.adm.com/en-US/Milling/Flour/USWheat/Pages/Gigantic.aspx. Of these four flours, I would guess the Gigantic as the most likely flour for the type of pizza that Pizzeria Regina makes.

Peter

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2010, 10:34:26 PM »
Huh thats interesting about the yeast.  I live less than 5 miles from the merrimack NH brewery.  I know I know people that work there,  just cant remember who right now,  but they are open for tours every day....  -marc

edit: two of the major homebrew suppliers are fermentis and white labs.  I have used the saflager before to ferment dough as you might remember peter.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2010, 10:44:23 PM by widespreadpizza »

Offline dms

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2010, 12:08:23 AM »
bakerbill,

That is interesting information. I wonder where one would buy Anheuser Busch brewer's yeast. Maybe one of our beer brewing members will know.


There are culturable quantities of yeast in nearly all beer, even filtered stuff.  So it's quite possible to take a bottle of Bud, and grow the yeast from it.  I wouldn't be surprised if one (or more) of the commercial beer suppliers sell a yeast that's derived from AB's stuff. 

Online scott123

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2010, 12:23:27 AM »
There are culturable quantities of yeast in nearly all beer, even filtered stuff.

Are you sure about this?  All of ABs beers are pasteurized. As far as I know, yeast can't survive the pasteurization process.

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2010, 07:56:57 AM »
Scott,  I pulled this off of the AB site.  I had no idea that bud was naturally carbonated,  by using the same method many craft breweries use,  most notably sierra neveda.   On the fact sheet for Bud,  there is no mention of it.  I wonder if the miller cold filtered,  never heat pasteurized adds way back were just brainwash aimed at the king?

Ingredients/Brewing:
Brewed using a blend of imported and classic American aroma hops and a blend of barley malts and rice. Budweiser is brewed with time-honored methods including “kraeusening” for natural carbonation and Beechwood aging, which results in unparalleled balance and character.

-marc
« Last Edit: March 02, 2010, 08:00:22 AM by widespreadpizza »


Offline dms

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2010, 11:04:31 AM »
Are you sure about this?  All of ABs beers are pasteurized. As far as I know, yeast can't survive the pasteurization process.

I don't know if all of AB's bottle and can products are pasteurized.  (Probably, but I don't know, nor care much).  But their draft beers aren't.  And beer pasteurization doesn't kill everything, just the vast majority.  If you've got a good procedure, and the right equipment, you can make cultures from it.  (An acquaintance of  mine did it when he was in grad school.  His adviser used it for a class demo.) 

Offline bakerbill

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2010, 03:50:05 PM »
Peter,

Checking the note, it said Archer Daniels Midland. I tried to get some information from the Anheuser Busch web site but was unsuccessful. Perhaps other members can find out more about it and whether it is available to general public.

bakerbill

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2010, 06:11:42 PM »
Anyone remember eagle snacks?  I always herad around here that tha was AB's way of using up brewing byproducts.  Wheter that is true or not........  maybe they were selling thier yeast and or still do?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Regina Pizzeria
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2010, 06:28:04 PM »
I also checked the Anheuser-Busch website and, when I found nothing pertinent there, I did some Google searching. Among other things, I discovered that A-B sold five-pound packages of brewer's yeast under the Budweiser name during Prohibition. That was enough to allow users to make a large batch of beer. To see if A-B still had a yeast connection, I called their number from their website and spoke with a customer service rep and also a fellow in their materials section to whom I was referred. From these individuals, I learned that A-B sold its yeast business in 1988. The company that purchased the business resold it and then went out of business. I was told that Fleischmann's ended up with the business. But when I called Fleischmann's, I was told that they did not end up with the A-H yeast business.

From what I can tell, there are active and inactive forms of brewer's yeast. The active form can be used to make beer and has some limited baking applications. We know the latter from the work that Marc (widespreadpizza) and one or two other members conducted using beer yeasts. The inactive form is used as a nutritional supplement, and is typically found in vitamin shops. One can only speculate which form, if any, Pizzeria Regina is using. They may also be using normal commercial yeast. I was told by the A-B materials specialist that A-B now uses only liquid forms of yeast.

Through my research today, I also came across an interesting discussion of the Budweiser yeast finding its way into the hands of home brewers, at http://www.bayoubro.com/index_files/Excerpt2.htm. The pertinent section is excerpted below:

As to the theories of the availability of Bud yeast, the prevailing speculation is that it had long ago fallen into the hands of homebrewers, who traded it around under the moniker “Amateur Brewer’s Yeast”—or “AB Yeast,” for short, the AB being a wink and a nudge that really meant Anheuser-Busch. It’s a matter of historical fact that Anheuser-Busch was in the baker’s yeast business until 1988; one of the Yeast People told me that for a while the baker’s yeast strain it sold was actually the same as its Bud beer-yeast strain. True or not, AB Yeast ended up in the yeast labs where it is sold under guises such as the one that Steve Moore described.

Beyond that, there are other ways the Bud yeast could have made its way into this quasi-public domain. Bud is pasteurized and filtered before bottling to kill any existing organisms, including yeast, so there’s little chance that yeast could have been cloned directly from the beer itself. But given the tons of yeast that Anheuser-Busch uses annually and the number of people with access to it over the decades, it’s hardly unimaginable that a thimbleful walked out of a brewery someplace one day and into the test tube of a yeast rustler. And, as we’ll see, the possibilities don’t end there. The official Anheuser-Busch position is that the yeast it uses today is from the original strain acquired by Adolphus Busch in 1876 and is indeed proprietary. The company had no comment on whether people have or haven’t cloned it.


Peter