Author Topic: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"  (Read 8580 times)

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Offline Irish Daveyboy

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March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« on: March 01, 2010, 08:16:15 PM »
Hi All,
I was invited to host this months challenge.

Your criteria is to create a pizza 'WITHOUT DOUGH' any other medium is exceptable.

So lets see how creative you are ?

Suggested mediums are:

Potato

Pasta

Vegetable

Rice

Ground Nuts/Seeds


Here's an example of a Rice Crust Type Pizza.


Best Regards,
David H

Diagnosed Coeliac 2005 after Chronic Illness. Couldn't eat the commercially available GF Foods.
Decided to make my own, I read cookbooks both GF and regular so now I devise my own from 'scratch recipes'

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Offline DKM

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2010, 07:01:28 PM »
I like this one. ;D
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2010, 10:45:19 PM »
This was a hard one since pizza for me is always about the dough. So this isn't a pizza. Not sure what to call it, but it is a Southeast Asian something.

The crust is made from sticks of sweet potato that have been soaked in slaked lime (calcium hydroxide). A batter/binder was made from rice flour and tapioca flour and combined with the sweet potato sticks. The mixture was poured into hot peanut oil and fried into a disk until golden. Topped with:
- shrimp
- fresh mint
- toasted peanuts
- cilantro
- red onion

drizzled with sauce of:
- lime juice
- fish sauce
- sugar
- garlic

Eaten wrapped in a lettuce leaf. NOT pizza but a great combination of flavors, textures, and temperatures.

Sometimes I use big words that I don’t fully understand in an effort to make myself sound more photosynthesis. - @itjenlawrence

Offline Irish Daveyboy

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2010, 05:33:45 AM »
This was a hard one since pizza for me is always about the dough. So this isn't a pizza. Not sure what to call it, but it is a Southeast Asian something.

The crust is made from sticks of sweet potato that have been soaked in slaked lime (calcium hydroxide). A batter/binder was made from rice flour and tapioca flour and combined with the sweet potato sticks. The mixture was poured into hot peanut oil and fried into a disk until golden. Topped with:
- shrimp
- fresh mint
- toasted peanuts
- cilantro
- red onion

drizzled with sauce of:
- lime juice
- fish sauce
- sugar
- garlic

NOT pizza but a great combination of flavors, textures, and temperatures.



Hi Bill,
It looks really tasty and I would have no problem sampling it.

I've looked on the Internet and found Bases (crusts) made with sliced Zuchinni in a 9" cake tin and one made with ground Almonds, seeds egg and cheese and then baked.

Best Regards,
David
Diagnosed Coeliac 2005 after Chronic Illness. Couldn't eat the commercially available GF Foods.
Decided to make my own, I read cookbooks both GF and regular so now I devise my own from 'scratch recipes'

Click links for Website &  Recipes Blogs 

David's Space
Glutenfree-Au-Naturale
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Gluten Free Internet Recipes

Offline norma427

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2010, 11:54:21 AM »
Rainy Day Breakfast

This challenge was interesting to me.  I decided to do a pizza crust with potato starch and tapioca flour with added Betty Crocker Seasoned Skillet Hash Browns.  Since the Hash Browns have added onion, I thought that would add to the taste of the crust.  I could have grated my own potatoes, but have used these Betty Crocker Seasoned Skillet Hash Browns for breakfast many times and like them.

The ingredients I used were:

1/3 cup Tapioca Flour
1 cup Potato Starch
1/4 tsp. Baking Powder
1/4 cup milk ( I added ½ tsp. Baking Soda and ½ tsp. Apple Cider Vinegar to the milk) this makes the mixture foam and creates something like buttermilk
½ tsp. IDY
½ tsp. Sea Salt
1 egg beaten well
½ cup water
1 package of Betty Crocker Seasoned Skillet Hash Browns

I mix the crust together and refrigerated it overnight.  When I checked on the mixture in the morning it was hard. I guess the potatoes absorbed the water. I then added another ½ cup warm water.  This seems to make the mixture better.

Aluminum foil was first put on the pan with olive oil The crust has some extra olive oil drizzled on before baking and then was baked without the topping until it was almost finished.  It was then dressed with red caramelized onions, eggs scrambled, bacon, cooked sausage links, White American Cheese, Parmesan cheese Asiago Cheese and a drizzles Texas Pete’s Buffalo Style Chicken Wing Barbecue Sauce mixed with butter.  A few pieces of Italian Parsley were used for the garnished.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2010, 11:55:39 AM »
rest of pictures..sorry I posted the pictures in the wrong order.  The last picture was before the pie was baked.

Norma
« Last Edit: March 13, 2010, 12:00:11 PM by norma427 »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2010, 12:35:25 PM »
Norma,

Your breakfast "pizza" looks mighty tasty. How did you like it?

I wondered whether your pizza was entirely gluten-free, especially since you used some ingredients like tapioca flour and potato starch. I believe that most baking powders are now gluten-free, including the Calumet's. However, when I looked at the ingredients list for the Betty Crocker Seasoned Skillet Hash Browns, at http://www.generalmills.com/corporate/brands/product_image.aspx?catID=23343&itemID=3647, I see that there is some wheat flour in the product. Of course, that is easily remedied if one wants to avoid the wheat flour, as by grating your own potatoes, etc., as you mentioned. A latkes "base", but without using any wheat flour to make the latkes, would also make a very nice breakfast dish with the eggs and other toppings you used.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2010, 12:49:11 PM »
Peter,

The pizza was tasty..just the edges of the crust was baked a little to long.  The bottom of the crust did have crunch.  No, I don't think my pizza was entirely gluten-free, because I also looked at the ingredients on the Betty Crocker Skillet Hash Browns and saw there was wheat flour in them.  If I would have made the potatoes by grating them myself, I guess the pizza would have been gluten-free.  I never tried any latkes, so I really don't know they taste.  Maybe the latkes is something I will have to look into to. 
Was this challenge supposed to be all gluten-free? 

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2010, 01:13:29 PM »
Was this challenge supposed to be all gluten-free? 

Norma,

Since nothing was said on this point, I would have to say that the answer is no. However, since Irish Daveyboy is hosting the Challenge this month, I thought that if I were to participate in this Challenge, I would try to come up with something that is completely gluten-free that those with celiac disease might possibly enjoy. I have thought a lot about this month's Challenge, as I do with the other Challenges, and it is a tough one.

Peter


Offline Irish Daveyboy

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2010, 01:14:38 PM »
Peter,

The pizza was tasty..just the edges of the crust was baked a little to long.  The bottom of the crust did have crunch.  No, I don't think my pizza was entirely gluten-free, because I also looked at the ingredients on the Betty Crocker Skillet Hash Browns and saw there was wheat flour in them.  If I would have made the potatoes by grating them myself, I guess the pizza would have been gluten-free.  I never tried any latkes, so I really don't know they taste.  Maybe the latkes is something I will have to look into to. 
Was this challenge supposed to be all gluten-free? 

Norma

Norma,
Well done, It looks good and I imagine it also tastes good.
On the point of being Gluten Free, as I'm a Coeliac I'd think that leaving out the hash brown would help,
I'd have reservations about the sausages (Breakfast links) as they probably would contain breadcrumbs or rusk.

Well done.

Best Regards,
David
Diagnosed Coeliac 2005 after Chronic Illness. Couldn't eat the commercially available GF Foods.
Decided to make my own, I read cookbooks both GF and regular so now I devise my own from 'scratch recipes'

Click links for Website &  Recipes Blogs 

David's Space
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Gluten Free Internet Recipes

Offline Irish Daveyboy

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2010, 01:22:03 PM »
Norma,

Since nothing was said on this point, I would have to say that the answer is no. However, since Irish Daveyboy is hosting the Challenge this month, I thought that if I were to participate in this Challenge, I would try to come up with something that is completely gluten-free that those with celiac disease might possibly enjoy. I have thought a lot about this month's Challenge, as I do with the other Challenges, and it is a tough one.

Peter

Hi Peter,
No it wasn't designed to be a Gluten Free Challenge.

I just thought it would be interesting to see how seasoned pizza makers
would cope without a dough crust.

Best Regards,
David
Diagnosed Coeliac 2005 after Chronic Illness. Couldn't eat the commercially available GF Foods.
Decided to make my own, I read cookbooks both GF and regular so now I devise my own from 'scratch recipes'

Click links for Website &  Recipes Blogs 

David's Space
Glutenfree-Au-Naturale
The Gluten Free Video Cookbook
Gluten Free Internet Recipes

Offline norma427

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2010, 01:40:32 PM »
David,

Thanks for saying the pie looks good.  I was also thinking about how to go about making a gluten-free pie and the choices are a lot more limited, in my opinion.  I am sure since you know much more about this being Coeliac, you are the best person to advise on what might have ingredients in that can’t be used.  As I said I had thought about using raw potatoes and grating them, but decided to go the easy way.  I never even thought about sausage having breadcrumbs in them.  I went the easy way with the sausage, also.  I used Banquet Turkey Brown’N Serve Sausage.  I just looked on the box and I can’t see that any breadcrumbs are used.  The ingredients say turkey, water, soy protein, citric acid, corn syrup, dextrose, natural flavorings, salt, soy lecithin, spices, sugar.  Are any of this ingredients something you can’t eat?
Since you have said it wasn’t meant to be a Gluten-Free Challenge I now have something else in mind to try.

Thanks,

Norma

Peter,

I have an idea for you.  Maybe it isn’t something you want to try, but I have made Mexican Potato Pancakes and they use fresh grated potatoes, salt, pepper, hot pepper sauce, onions, eggs, jalapenos and you could use one of the flours that people that are Coeliac can use.

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2010, 01:49:47 PM »
Peter,

I have an idea for you.  Maybe it isn’t something you want to try, but I have made Mexican Potato Pancakes and they use fresh grated potatoes, salt, pepper, hot pepper sauce, onions, eggs, jalapenos and you could use one of the flours that people that are Coeliac can use.

Norma,

Thank you for the idea. Because of David, Canadave and others, I have been looking for the types of gluten-free ingredients that they have mentioned and used but, where I am, there are very few of them sold in the supermarkets. I will have to await my next trip into Dallas to see whether the stores there carry such items.

Peter

Offline Irish Daveyboy

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2010, 01:50:55 PM »
David,

I never even thought about sausage having breadcrumbs in them.  I went the easy way with the sausage, also.  I used Banquet Turkey Brown’N Serve Sausage.  I just looked on the box and I can’t see that any breadcrumbs are used.  The ingredients say turkey, water, soy protein, citric acid, corn syrup, dextrose, natural flavorings, salt, soy lecithin, spices, sugar.  Are any of this ingredients something you can’t eat?
Since you have said it wasn’t meant to be a Gluten-Free Challenge I now have something else in mind to try.

Thanks,

Norma

Hi Norma,
sometimes spices have a flour added to keeping them free-flowing (thought not necessarily Wheat)
Also they could be produced on a line that produces gluten laden foods (breaded) and therfore could be Cross Contaminated with Gluten.

I presume you've looked at my Gluten Free Pizza Crust in the Gluten Free Section ?

Best Regards,
David
Diagnosed Coeliac 2005 after Chronic Illness. Couldn't eat the commercially available GF Foods.
Decided to make my own, I read cookbooks both GF and regular so now I devise my own from 'scratch recipes'

Click links for Website &  Recipes Blogs 

David's Space
Glutenfree-Au-Naturale
The Gluten Free Video Cookbook
Gluten Free Internet Recipes

Offline Irish Daveyboy

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2010, 02:06:10 PM »
Norma,

Thank you for the idea. Because of David, Canadave and others, I have been looking for the types of gluten-free ingredients that they have mentioned and used but, where I am, there are very few of them sold in the supermarkets. I will have to await my next trip into Dallas to see whether the stores there carry such items.

Peter

Hi Peter,
These are the ingredients I use in my GF Pizza Crust.

1 sachet of dried yeast 7g or 2.25 tsp (bakery section of any supermarket)
100g of brown rice flour (Asian Food store)
70g of tapioca starch/flour  (Asian food store Cassava or Manioc)
2 Tbls of dried milk powder  (cadbury's Marvel)
2 tsp of xanthan gum (health food store or Asian market)
1/2 tsp of salt
1 tsp of dried gelatin powder (bakery section used to make homemade Jellies)
1 Tbls of mixed Italian herbs  (Supermarket McCormicks Herb stand)
160ml of warm water (105 deg) (Think baby's bottle on back of wrist)
1/2 tsp of caster sugar/superfine
1 tsp of olive oil
1 tsp of apple cider/red wine vinegar (Supermarket)

Not all that hard to find if you have the stores closeby.

Best Regards,
David
Diagnosed Coeliac 2005 after Chronic Illness. Couldn't eat the commercially available GF Foods.
Decided to make my own, I read cookbooks both GF and regular so now I devise my own from 'scratch recipes'

Click links for Website &  Recipes Blogs 

David's Space
Glutenfree-Au-Naturale
The Gluten Free Video Cookbook
Gluten Free Internet Recipes

Offline norma427

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #15 on: March 13, 2010, 02:11:08 PM »
David,

Your formula and pie look fantastic.  :)  I couldn’t imagine what it would be like to have to look at all the ingredients to make sure a grocery item doesn’t contain something I couldn’t eat.  Looks like you are doing a great job in making your own food. 
When I was at our local Country Store yesterday, I saw they have two aisles full of all kinds of Gluten-Free items.  The one item that interested me the most was the Gluten-Free pizza crust by Bob’s Red Mill.  Did you ever try that mix to see how the pizza tastes?  http://www.bobsredmill.com/gf_pizza-crust-mix.html  The mix in our local Country Store was 3.49 for a one crust mix.

I also know the owner of that store and she showed me the many frozen items in their freezers.  I couldn’t believe how expensive those items were, but she told me many people buy them.  I think I would try to make my own food items.

Norma
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Offline ERASMO

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2010, 02:17:14 PM »
Bill
Can you tell me more about the soaked sweet pot.  What does that soaking do to them.  My wife and I really like sweet potato french fries but can never figure out the trick to getting them crispy.
Thanks


Offline norma427

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #17 on: March 13, 2010, 09:45:49 PM »
Second submission for this months challenge.

Funnel Cake Pizza with Dried Apples and Ice Cream

With an origin dating back to Germany in 1879, sweet funnel cakes have not only stood the test of time, but have also evolved into the fun finger food that we still crave today: Doughnuts, Fritters and Funnel Cakes. Appropriately named, funnel cakes have a donut-like taste and texture, but have been drizzled into hot oil with a funnel to create a lacy shape that's easily pulled apart and devoured. Once you discover how easy it is to make a batch on your own, funnel cake may just become your dessert and snack or pizza recipe

The funnel cake pizza I made is not gluten-free, but here are some recipes for gluten-free funnel cakes.

http://allergyfreedelights.com/funnel-cakes-for-new-years-eve/

http://www.recipezaar.com/Gluten-Free-Funnel-Cake-187546

I think the dressings for this Funnel Cake Pizza would be okay for people that can’t eat wheat, but am not sure.  ::)

I used a funnel cake mix, added 1 egg, and 1 cup of water.  Put batter into a funnel, drizzled in and then deep-fried.

The Funnel Cake Pizza was dressed with powdered sugar, vanilla ice cream, dried apples which were cooked and then these ingredients were added: (sugar, juice of ½ lemon, cinnamon, and dash of salt) After mixing this, the mixture was put back on the stove with added corn starch to thicken the mixture.

I like the nice and airy crumb, always!  ;D

Norma
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Offline Aldo

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #18 on: March 21, 2010, 12:21:04 AM »
Norma, thank you!  You bring a smile to my face seeing your latest post -- and always you bring a good word!  Many happy posts ahead!

Offline norma427

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #19 on: March 21, 2010, 01:07:39 AM »
Norma, thank you!  You bring a smile to my face seeing your latest post -- and always you bring a good word!  Many happy posts ahead!

Aldo,

Thanks for the kind words.  :)  My guess is you like funnel cakes. 

Many posts ahead for you, also  :D

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2010, 04:46:25 PM »
My entry for this month’s Monthly Challenge is a crustless deep-dish pizza. The idea for this type of pizza came to me when I was researching deep-dish pizzas sold by Malnati’s, the famous purveyor of deep-dish pizzas in the Chicago area. Their crustless deep-dish pizza is based on using sausage to prepare a shell, or “patty”, that is fit into a deep-dish pan, followed by slices of low-moisture, part-skim mozzarella cheese, a fresh-pack tomato based pizza sauce, toppings, and a grated cheese/oregano blend. I decided to make a basic cheese pizza although, as noted below, I found that I was able to add multiple toppings on top of slices that were reheated in my toaster oven. To the best of my knowledge, the mail order crustless pizza is a plain 9” cheese pizza.

From what I have read, the Malnati’s crustless deep-dish pizza has been certified (if that is the correct term) as being gluten-free. In my research, I also found a few bloggers who said that the Malnati’s crustless pizza was, in fact, gluten-free (some said carb-free also). I believe that Malnati’s menu in their stores also make reference to that pizza as being gluten-free. When I looked for a photo of the pizza at the Malnati’s website, I could not find one. However, I was able to find several photos posted on the Internet, of which the photos at http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/8vFJH_paXsMocmEO_KAa3w?select=0EUEoOGbGy6B6FXmc9JFSQ and http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/8vFJH_paXsMocmEO_KAa3w?select=LNIzq6uvSoaZhgy6qnhBMA are representative. As can be seen, the toppings for the crustless pizza are placed on top of the sauce rather than under as Malnati’s does with its other deep-dish pizzas. I would imagine that pepperoni slices might be placed under the sauce, but I was not able to confirm this.

To make my crustless pizza, I pressed bulk Italian sausage into a 9” x 2” straight-sided aluminum cake pan that I had lightly oiled on the bottom with a bit of olive oil. I pressed the sausage up the sides of the pan by about 1 ½”. In purchasing the bulk sausage, I asked the butcher what was in it. He brought me the box in which the supermarket receives the sausage, and I saw that it did not contain any flour or any other filler or ingredient that might be out of bounds for those who want a gluten-free product. The supplier of the sausage is Syracuse Sausage Company, a Texas-based meat products company. After I fitted the sausage “patty” into the pan, I added slices of low-moisture, part-skim mozzarella cheese (a store brand) on top of the sausage patty. I did not have any fresh-pack tomatoes from which to make a pizza sauce like that used by Malnati’s, so I used Redpack whole peeled tomatoes in thick puree. To form the sauce, I crushed the tomatoes by hand and drained the contents of the can in a sieve until I got a texture and consistency such as I observed in a Mark Malnati YouTube video at . To simulate the sweetness of the fresh-pack tomatoes (from San Benito’s) that Malnati’s uses, I added a couple of teaspoons of honey to the drained tomatoes. I thought the sauce was very nice tasting.

In terms of quantities, I used 10.3 ounces of sausage, 7.15 ounces of mozzarella cheese slices, and 10.25 ounces of sauce. Before baking the pizza, I sprinkled grated Parmesan and Romano cheeses over the pizza, along with some dried oregano. The unbaked pizza weighed 27.55 ounces.

I baked the pizza in a way as to simulate how I imagined Malnati’s bakes its crustless pizzas, specifically, in a deck oven (quite likely dedicated to crustless pizzas). In my case, I baked my version of the crustless pizza on a pizza stone that I had placed at the middle oven rack position of my electric oven and preheated for about an hour at 475 degrees F. The pizza baked for about 25 minutes. When I removed the pizza from the oven, I saw that the pizza had shrunk away from the sides of the pan as the sausage baked. When I attempted to remove the pizza from the pan, I experienced a slight problem with the bottom of the pizza sticking to the pan. I attributed this to the fact that I was using a pan that I have been gradually seasoning but apparently was not yet fully seasoned. Fortunately, I was able to use a small spatula to dislodge and remove the pizza, although it would have been possible to cut the pizza into slices right in the pan. However, next time, I would use a dark, anodized deep-dish pan with smooth surfaces.

The finished pizza weighed 22.6 ounces. That represented a loss of weight during baking of 4.95 ounces, or about 17.3%. That was more than what I would have expected. For comparison purposes, the Malnati’s Nutrition Facts for its 9” mail-order crustless pizza indicates that the pizza weighs around 19 ounces. I have never seen a real-life Malnati’s mail-order crustless pizza, so I have no way of knowing whether my version was, in fact, too heavy.

The photos below show the finished pizza. I thought it turned out quite well. However, it was different than a typical crusted deep-dish pizza for which I have developed a fond attachment. Yet the flavors were very good. I later decided that I would use various toppings on leftover slices to be reheated in my toaster oven. The last photo shows a slice that I reheated with sautéed diced green pepper, sliced mushrooms, onions (caramelized) and pepperoni slices.

Peter

Offline Irish Daveyboy

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2010, 05:15:40 PM »
Second submission for this months challenge.

Funnel Cake Pizza with Dried Apples and Ice Cream

The Funnel Cake Pizza was dressed with powdered sugar, vanilla ice cream, dried apples which were cooked and then these ingredients were added: (sugar, juice of ½ lemon, cinnamon, and dash of salt) After mixing this, the mixture was put back on the stove with added corn starch to thicken the mixture.

I like the nice and airy crumb, always!  ;D

Norma

OMG Norma,

Cholesterol City here I come, great idea, I wonder?

Could you incorporate golden sultanas, cooked apple, apple pie spice and cinnamon within the batter?
The batter probably would need to be thicker and the funnel larger, a bit like a German Strudel but in batter instead of pastry

Best Regards,
David
Diagnosed Coeliac 2005 after Chronic Illness. Couldn't eat the commercially available GF Foods.
Decided to make my own, I read cookbooks both GF and regular so now I devise my own from 'scratch recipes'

Click links for Website &  Recipes Blogs 

David's Space
Glutenfree-Au-Naturale
The Gluten Free Video Cookbook
Gluten Free Internet Recipes

Offline Irish Daveyboy

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #22 on: March 22, 2010, 05:23:37 PM »
My entry for this month’s Monthly Challenge is a crustless deep-dish pizza. The idea for this type of pizza came to me when I was researching deep-dish pizzas sold by Malnati’s, the famous purveyor of deep-dish pizzas in the Chicago area.

The photos below show the finished pizza. I thought it turned out quite well. However, it was different than a typical crusted deep-dish pizza for which I have developed a fond attachment. Yet the flavors were very good. I later decided that I would use various toppings on leftover slices to be reheated in my toaster oven. The last photo shows a slice that I reheated with sautéed diced green pepper, sliced mushrooms, onions (caramelized) and pepperoni slices.

Peter


Looks good Peter,
maybe a little 'greasy' from the saugage meat, but a great entry.

Your last photo (the re-heated slice with onions mushrooms etc, looks like a meal in itself).

Thanks for the heads up on the Crustless GF Pizza from Malnati’s in Chicago, handy for travellers to the USA especially those going to Chicago.

Best Regards,
David
Diagnosed Coeliac 2005 after Chronic Illness. Couldn't eat the commercially available GF Foods.
Decided to make my own, I read cookbooks both GF and regular so now I devise my own from 'scratch recipes'

Click links for Website &  Recipes Blogs 

David's Space
Glutenfree-Au-Naturale
The Gluten Free Video Cookbook
Gluten Free Internet Recipes

Offline norma427

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #23 on: March 22, 2010, 06:36:13 PM »
Irish Daveyboy,

I guess you could incorporate golden sultanas, cooked apple, apple pie spice and cinnamon within the batter.  You would just need something like a tea pot and then pour a thicker batter. There are special kinds of pourers that have a bigger opening for pouring batter.  The thicker batter could be something like a fritter batter.  They also use apples and raisins in that kind of batter.  As far as cholesterol, in my opinion a little bit doesn’t hurt.

Norma

Peter,

You and Bill always come up with the unique ideas for the Challenge.   The third picture  Crustless deep dish slice 3.JPG (60.01 KB, 490x367 really looks like a deep dish slice.  I can imagine that crustless deep-dish pizza was very tasty. I also never knew there was a Malnati’s crustless pizza.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: March 2010 Monthly Challenge.."anything except dough"
« Reply #24 on: March 25, 2010, 01:42:36 PM »
Following up on my last "crustless" deep-dish pizza, I decided to make a somewhat different version, but still be a gluten-free pizza. For my latest effort, I decided to combine rice flour with some bulk sausage to see if I could achieve some "crunch" to the sausage "shell". Since I did not want to make a pizza that ended up not being edible and having to throw it away, I decided to make a "mini" deep-dish pizza using a small (7" x 6.5" x 0.75") dark anodized PSTK cutter pan. Such a cutter pan is shown at http://www.pizzatools.com/Cutter_Pans/subgrouping.htm?cat=30870&orderfield=prsdesc&sort=sku&mid=0.

To prepare the sausage shell, I took an amount of bulk sausage that appeared to be enough to completely cover the inside surfaces of the cutter pan when pressed or rolled out. To the sausage, I added some rice flour. I added as much of the rice flour as the sausage would take but still be fairly dry and not be stiff. I stopped adding the rice flour when the sausage had a feel and consistency of a piece of pizza dough. At this point, the rice flour/sausage ball was not greasy to the touch, no doubt because the fat in the sausage had absorbed the rice flour. By analogy to a pizza dough ball, I would say that the "hydration" of the rice flour/sausage ball was around 60%. Since this was an impromptu experiment, I did not note, by weight, the amounts of sausage and rice flour I actually used. However, the rice flour/sausage ball felt like a piece of dough. To simplify the assembly process, I rolled out the rice flour/sausage ball to a diameter large enough to completely to fit the inside of the cutter pan. This was very easy to do. I then formed the "shell" to fit the cutter pan. This step was far easier to consummate than using only raw sausage, which has a tendency to stick to ones fingers and to slide and shift a lot.

To dress the pizza, I added slices of low-moisture, part-skim cheese on top of the shell. This was followed by a few pepperoni slices, pizza sauce, and toppings that included sauteed mushrooms, caramelized sweet onions, diced green pepper and a cheese/oregano blend of grated Romano and Parmesan cheeses and some dried oregano. In retrospect, I am certain that I could have "built" the pizza in the standard manner. However, I wanted to stay with the approach that I understand Malnati's uses for its crustless pizza. The pizza so dressed was baked in my countertop toaster oven for about 20 minutes at a temperature of about 475 degrees F. I did not use a small pizza stone. I simply placed the pan on the lowest rack position of my toaster oven.

The photos below show the finished pizza. I thought that it was excellent. The rice flour/sausage shell was crispy and crunchy. This was evident from the moment I ran my pizza cutter across the pizza to cut it into slices. The rice flour/sausage shell was not greasy, which came as a surprise to me, yet the flavors of the cooked sausage were still there. But not so much as to distract one from the rest of the pizza. I am sure that it should be able to make a normal deep-dish pizza using a regular deep-dish pan and a shell as described above. In fact, I plan to try such a deep-dish pizza some time. I would perhaps build the pizza in the typical way, if only to see how such a pizza compares with the regular deep-dish pizzas I have made.

Overall, I thought that the latest pizza was considerably better than the crustless Malnati-style deep-dish pizza that I discussed earlier in this thread. I think the crunchy, essentially greaseless rice flour/sausage shell was the main reason. It also occurs to me that the sausage is a good medium or vehicle amenable to taking on ingredients other than rice flour, like ground nuts or some of the other gluten-free ingredients that celiacs often use.

Peter


 

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