Author Topic: Worst Case: Cost of fixing a used conventional oven?  (Read 1203 times)

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Offline locoarts

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Worst Case: Cost of fixing a used conventional oven?
« on: March 04, 2010, 09:32:41 AM »
Hi all..

Ok I have a chance to buy a used conventional oven (boggratt) I dont know the exact spelling/name.. But that brand. 

Well I can get it for really really cheap! Ok here is the story, the guy has restaurants.. he bought it from a school auction, he hasn't used it at all and its in his garage. The guy wants it out of his garage because it's taking up space.

1) Ok worst case. How much would it cost to fix something like this. I know we dont know whats wrong with it, but worst case.

( The price is really low, Im taking his word of the auction and not needing it, Ive seen people just buy stuff maybe for down the line, so that doesn't sound far fetched - At the price, I think I'll be still ahead if I had to fix it.. Im thinking worth the risk)

2) Also, Is there a way I can kinda check it out in his garage before I buy it? Plug it in.. and then what? Can I kinda see something?? Anything else can I do in the guys garage?


Suggestions? Idea of Repair (ball park) worst case.

Thanks
l:)


Offline GotRocks

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Re: Worst Case: Cost of fixing a used conventional oven?
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2010, 10:41:23 AM »
My suggestion is to get the correct name of the manufacturer, (Blodgett maybe?) model number, and serial number and call the manufacturer or an authoirzed service provider, and get the scoop from them. They should be able to tell you typical maintenance needs, high-fatality parts, and what to watch out for better than anyone.

You may be looking at items like replacing deck parts, thermostat parts, hinges, along with a host of other items. They may even be able to pull up a service history for you to see if & what has been replaced, and a general idea of what shape it was in when it was in it's working place.
A skinny cook is not to be trusted!

Offline pcampbell

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Re: Worst Case: Cost of fixing a used conventional oven?
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2010, 11:13:25 AM »
Definitely find out the model #.  It must be a Blodgett. 

Find out if it is a PIZZA oven or bake oven. Blodgett sells a lot of bake ovens that are not designed to have high BTUs necessary for pizza. 

I know that these ovens can rust inside if especially they use aluminized (sp.) steel not stainless. They also may not be the best insulated.   

I know when I turn mine on it starts condensing, which I do not really understand.... and concerns me since wet insulation does not insulate right.

Mechanically these ovens really have only 3-4 real parts to the gas system.  One is a shut off valve, this never fails and if it does costs $5 to fix

Thermostat is like 100-200 bucks.  Also does not fail very often I don't think. 

The next is a thing called a pilot safety valve.  This cuts the gas flow off if BOTH the main burner and pilot flame go out.  I feel like this is really only necessary if you leave the pilot running all night when you are not there.  Also 100-200 bucks.

Somewhere in there is a fuel pressure regulator, sometimes part of the pilot safety, and sometimes not.

Then there are the stones... which can break.

I think the doors are pretty straight forward.

« Last Edit: March 04, 2010, 11:25:58 AM by pcampbell »
Patrick

Offline locoarts

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Re: Worst Case: Cost of fixing a used conventional oven?
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2010, 03:19:32 PM »
well thank you! I know I was vague, I wanted a general idea because I can get it for a few 100 dollars... so its good to ask.

thank you!
 ;D

Offline dms

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Re: Worst Case: Cost of fixing a used conventional oven?
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2010, 06:40:15 PM »

The next is a thing called a pilot safety valve.  This cuts the gas flow off if BOTH the main burner and pilot flame go out.  I feel like this is really only necessary if you leave the pilot running all night when you are not there.  Also 100-200 bucks.

Your fire marshall, insurance company, and gas company rather strongly disagree.  (So do I: flame proving devices save lives; but my approbation doesn't mean much.) 

Offline pcampbell

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Re: Worst Case: Cost of fixing a used conventional oven?
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2010, 06:54:29 PM »
I am sure it is required.  I wouldn't put one in a restaurant without it.
Patrick


 

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