Author Topic: difference between paste, crushed, pureed, etc  (Read 7140 times)

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Offline Jackie Tran

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  • Location: Albuquerque NM
Re: difference between paste, crushed, pureed, etc
« Reply #20 on: March 15, 2010, 04:26:21 PM »
Whoops I screwed up,, it's the Sams club that sells the San Benitos.  I'll check out Costco to see what they have later.

I usually drain and strain all the liquid aside and add the residue back in with the tomatoes.  I'll also strain the tomatoes after I've blended them so I'm tossing out quite a bit of water.  At those prices I won't even worry about it compared to the San Marzanos at $5 a 28 oz can.

Thanks for the tip about keeping it refrigerated.   I'll vacuum seal them so they should last abit longer, though I can probably use them up by then.   I guess I'm going back to stock up on San Benitos.   :-D
« Last Edit: March 15, 2010, 04:38:21 PM by Tranman »


scott123

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Re: difference between paste, crushed, pureed, etc
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2010, 04:53:00 PM »
I got into pizza making primarily for two reasons:

1. My favorite local pizzeria, over the last decade or so, started cutting corners (lower temp, lower hydration, increased thickness factor, teenage help).

2. I got tired of spending $12+ a pie.

Although it seems like every day I spend a little more money on raw materials, the frugality still plays a large part of the experience.

It takes a lot more effort, but I can produce a similar quality pie from $.15/lb private label supermarket flour (on sale) that I get from $.32/lb bromated All Trumps.  I can also almost always find some brand of mozzarella on sale for $1.99, and, if I'm very carefully to choose rigid/non squishy packages and use it quickly, the results are top notch.

But, tomatoes... yeesh.  I'm having a really hard time finding an economical tomato.  Out of all the supermarket brand purees (I've tried all the <$2 ones), the only one I'll go near is Cento. Everything else tastes like reconstituted paste (which it is). I can get cento on sale for as little as .99 a 28 oz. can. That can of cento is thick enough to be able to add a few oz. of water to- enough to be able to just squeeze 4 17" pies out of. With longer and longer cold ferments, my yeast cost per pie is negligible.  And I grow my own basil.

I really like the idea of a $1.50 pizza (about where I'm at now).  I've purchased the Cento San Marzano's and a local brand (Corrado's).  Both say they're packed in 'puree.'  Yeah, right  ::) If I food mill the tomatoes and add the 'puree,' the sauce I end up with is too watery for pizza. If I leave enough of the juice out, I only end up with enough sauce for 2 pies.  I don't really mind the food milling too much, but at $2.50 for a 28 oz. can (Corrado's), I'm almost doubling the cost of my raw materials.

I have to admit, I like the taste of the SMs. Quite a bit.  Even watery, they're still pretty flavorful/fresh tasting. But that $1.25 per pie bump... I'm telling you, it's keeping me awake at night :)

Offline Jackie Tran

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  • Location: Albuquerque NM
Re: difference between paste, crushed, pureed, etc
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2010, 05:47:03 PM »
Unless you have to keep cost as low as possible....life is too short to ______.  I'd say splurge and go for the better tomatoes.  If you are satisfied with the low cost pies, I'd stick with those BUT if you find yourself thinking about the SM tomatoes while eating your pizza, I'd splurge for the SM.   Just think, you're already saving like $8/pie when you bake at home and it tastes better! 

Or you can open up your own pizza shop and eat pizzas for free!