Author Topic: DRAMATIC Improvement!  (Read 460 times)

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Offline TurkeyOnRye

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DRAMATIC Improvement!
« on: August 26, 2016, 10:00:34 PM »
Yesterday, I posted my first results using the GlutenBoy recipe. I showcased the results of a 4-day cold ferment and noted some lackluster results. The crust suffered from lack of flavor, browning, and crumb development. Link below:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=44521.0

Today, I used up the rest of the dough, but decided to make a rather significant change. I don't have a pizza stone or pizza steel to work with, so my pizzas having been heating up rather slowly after going into the oven. To simulate a stone, instead of putting the sheet in cold with the pizza on top, I preheated the sheet pan in the oven, and then slid the pizza on top of it while resting on foil. It resulted in a much less dense crumb, a darker crust, and better flavor. Dramatically so, in fact. Not the perfect solution, certainly, but it seems to work.

I guess this just goes to show the importance of doing pizzas hot and fast. Although I still have much to learn with regard to creating a good dough, it would appear that a stone or steel would be the single greatest investment to improving my pizzas. 

Feeling accomplished that I made some real headway.  8)

« Last Edit: August 26, 2016, 10:03:47 PM by TurkeyOnRye »

Offline bigMoose

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Re: DRAMATIC Improvement!
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2016, 09:02:35 AM »
If you go looking for a stone, stay away from the cheaper 3/8 inch ones from discount stores.  I broke two of them going above 450 deg F early on.  I leaned from this board and went with a cordierite stone (mine was old stone brand) (can search for many threads on them) and it has been bulletproof.  Some use cordierite kiln shelves that fit the oven more fully.  Some have progressed to 1/2 inch steel for an even quicker bake in the home oven.

From your other thread, I also followed tips here and changed from ADY to IDY (SAF brand).  That change in yeast added the most consistency to my baking, both pizza's and breads.  IDY is the most reliable, predictable  and easy to use yeast.  Just mix it with the dry ingredients for most applications.  I buy a 1# brick of it, keep a small amount in a jar in the fridge, and the rest in a sealed jar in the freezer. 

Welcome to the board and just keep making pies, I found the joy is in the journey!  It also looks like you are off to a great start.

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: DRAMATIC Improvement!
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2016, 12:59:08 PM »
 ^^^

Offline TurkeyOnRye

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Re: DRAMATIC Improvement!
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2016, 07:11:38 PM »
If you go looking for a stone, stay away from the cheaper 3/8 inch ones from discount stores.  I broke two of them going above 450 deg F early on.  I leaned from this board and went with a cordierite stone (mine was old stone brand) (can search for many threads on them) and it has been bulletproof.  Some use cordierite kiln shelves that fit the oven more fully.  Some have progressed to 1/2 inch steel for an even quicker bake in the home oven.

From your other thread, I also followed tips here and changed from ADY to IDY (SAF brand).  That change in yeast added the most consistency to my baking, both pizza's and breads.  IDY is the most reliable, predictable  and easy to use yeast.  Just mix it with the dry ingredients for most applications.  I buy a 1# brick of it, keep a small amount in a jar in the fridge, and the rest in a sealed jar in the freezer. 

Welcome to the board and just keep making pies, I found the joy is in the journey!  It also looks like you are off to a great start.

Thanks for the feedback! I'm very interesting in getting a baking steel. The thicker variants are extremely expensive, but if I can get great results with a 3/8" steel for less, I think I'll do that. Aside from the steels that are <0.25", I've read people getting excellent results.

This crust, while much more flavorful and having a better-looking crumb and skin, was much too tough. Fairly difficult to bite into, actually. I'm scratching my head as to why that occurs and how I can fix that. If I could eliminate the toughness while increasing the puff on the ring, it would be almost perfect. Perhaps this particular dough could've benefited from a longer rest period after being shaped.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2016, 07:16:06 PM by TurkeyOnRye »

Offline bigMoose

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Re: DRAMATIC Improvement!
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2016, 02:49:52 PM »
I think there are two directions you could go to reduce the "toughness."  One would be lowering the gluten content of your flour.  For example, I tried a 50# bag of General Mills All Trumps (about 13.6%) and got some spectacular results, but more often not so good.  The pro's here can make superb pizza with it each time, every time.  But for this ol' guy it was just too temperamental.  A pro friend recommended that I go to 12.6% GM Full Strength flour and I have never looked back.  It is much more forgiving for my skill level.  You could go to an All Purpose (AP) flour for even more softness/tenderness.

Another way is to add more oil/shortening.  This will "shorten" the gluten strands and make for a softer dough.  I recently tried a cracker crust recipe with 11% oil (compared with my usual 4 to 6%) oil.  While I usually get a shatter in the crust, that 11% oil crust was tender everywhere but where I burnt it (as a test).  So upping the oil content will add tender.

Also adding milk or bakers milk solids will add tender.  For soft breads I add some potato flour.

The final way I know how to make tender is the high temperature bake.  It tends to give a nice thin, crunch crust and a tender center when done above 600 degF and with a nominal 62% ish hydration level NY dough.  I had it when I got to bake my dough in a pro's deck oven, and also in my friends home gas oven with the burner below.  He puts the stone down low and it gets much hotter than the 550 degF thermostat.

There are many threads here on tender crusts if you find the right search words, and also many that are more knowledgeable than I on this board.


 

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