Author Topic: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?  (Read 19184 times)

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Offline Bob1

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2010, 06:51:08 PM »
Norma,
Yes we do a nice size garden.  I have never used the manure tea.  I just till horse manure into the soil and it works pretty well.  The main work is in fertilizing, tilling, and mulching.  After the mulch no weeds grow.  The plants just need to be staked.  I assumed with all your energy you would be doing something with descent size.  Is it worth it for me to learn more about the tea?

Thanks,

Bob


Offline norma427

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2010, 07:17:07 PM »
Norma,
Yes we do a nice size garden.  I have never used the manure tea.  I just till horse manure into the soil and it works pretty well.  The main work is in fertilizing, tilling, and mulching.  After the mulch no weeds grow.  The plants just need to be staked.  I assumed with all your energy you would be doing something with descent size.  Is it worth it for me to learn more about the tea?

Thanks,

Bob

Bob,

Sounds like you are going to have a nice size garden.   :) The manure tea is a good organic fertilizer.  Doesn't take that much to make.  You can use the nursery variety or get some fresh.  Manure tea is simple to make. This is the ratio that is used for the water and manure (5 parts water to 1 part manure). You can either place a shovel full of manure in a 5-gallon bucket, which will require straining, or in a large burlap sack or pillowcase. This is a basic manure tea I use, but there are more on the web.  Just be careful if you use this it isn't too strong or it will kill the leaves or roots.  It should look like weak tea.  It should be fermented for at least a week or more is better.
Kinda sounds like using yeast and allowing the dough to ferment.  :-D

Norma
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Offline pdxstudies

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #22 on: April 28, 2010, 03:16:16 PM »
I have been buying "Seeds from Italy" for several years. I couldnt post the link since I am new but if you search for Seeds from Italy you will find the growitalian.com link.

Offline norma427

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #23 on: April 28, 2010, 03:25:10 PM »
I have been buying "Seeds from Italy" for several years. I couldnt post the link since I am new but if you search for Seeds from Italy you will find the growitalian.com link.

pdxstudies,

Thank you so much for this information.  :)  Is this the link?
http://growitalian.com/Qstore/Qstore.cgi 

It would be great to see some pictures of your plants.  Keep posting and after you have five posts, you will be able to post pictures and links.

Happy pizza making!

Norma
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Offline pcampbell

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2010, 03:58:32 PM »
I think my wife is using Johnny's organic seeds.

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/

Patrick

Offline norma427

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2010, 04:05:49 PM »
I think my wife is using Johnny's organic seeds.

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/



pcampbell,

Thanks for sharing where your wife gets the organic seeds.  :)

Norma
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Offline mmarston

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2010, 10:42:51 PM »
The mother of all heirloom seed sources.

http://www.seedsavers.org/

Tomatoes only
http://www.tomatofest.com/

Good general source.
http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/GP/homepage/page1

I would not recommend  growing San Marzano tomatoes in a non Mediterranean climate.
Look for varieties that match your climate and growing season.
Nobody cares if you can't dance well.  Just get up and dance.  Dave Barry

Offline norma427

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2010, 11:03:05 PM »
The mother of all heirloom seed sources.

http://www.seedsavers.org/

Tomatoes only
http://www.tomatofest.com/

Good general source.
http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/GP/homepage/page1

I would not recommend  growing San Marzano tomatoes in a non Mediterranean climate.
Look for varieties that match your climate and growing season.

mmarston,

Thanks for the sources for heirlooms, tomatoes and general sources.   :)

I never tried the San Marzano tomatoes, but thought I would give them a try this year, to see what happens.  I did purchase some tomato plants, but have about a month until I can safely plant them outside.  I am going to a place that sells heirloom plants.  Will see what I can find there this year.

Norma

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Offline norma427

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I saw on Facebook last evening that Landis Valley Museum was having a plant sale of leftover plants from their Heirloom Plant Project.  It said all their plants were 1.00.  I went there this morning and purchased different varieties of tomatoes and some other heirloom plants.  Then I went to another place that sells heirloom plants and purchased some different kinds of basil, Greek oregano and some other plants.

Pictures below are of the plant wagon at Landis Valley Museum and the different plants I purchased today.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Steve (Ev) gave me some tomato plants this past Tuesday, that he started from seed.  He gave me Amish Paste, Margherita, Super Marzano, Hung Italian, E Wonder and Viva Italiano.  Looks like I am going to be busy with tomato plants this summer.  Has anyone tried these different varieties in sauces they make for pizzas or even sauces they make for pastas?  First picture is of Steve’s plants he gave to me.

At least my San Marzano tomato plants I started from seed awhile ago, are finally staring to grow.  Last picture is of two of the plants.  Looks like Steve is a better gardener than I am.

Norma
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Offline beeftime

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If you are around  Mt. Laurel NJ there is a place called Springville Orchard and Herbary.

It's run by a very knowledgeable person and has almost every kind of herb imaginable.

Offline norma427

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If you are around  Mt. Laurel NJ there is a place called Springville Orchard and Herbary.

It's run by a very knowledgeable person and has almost every kind of herb imaginable.

beeftime,

Thanks for telling me where there is a good place to purchase herbs.  I can't remember at this moment, but think that is where Bob went to purchase his Oregano.  I live in Lancaster County, Pa., so NJ is a drive for me.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Some of my tomato plants are finally getting tomatoes on them.  The ones I started from seed are in the second picture the first four plants. I first started the San Marzano’s from seed around the end of March. I never thought they were going to get big.  The third picture is some of the other tomato plants.  The Jetstar and grape tomato plants also are getting tomatoes on the plants. Now to wait and see how they all taste.  I think I have 23 tomato plants.  ::)

I went on a Scentous Walk this morning and found out so much about wild plants that are native to our area and the smells that have.  There is a park called Central Park on the other side of Lancaster.  It has 544 acres. The park is all in its natural state. A Naturalist took us on the walk and showed us how many plants have smells you never thought they would.  http://www.co.lancaster.pa.us/parks/site/default.asp
If anyone lives around this area this park and programs are usually for free and the best kept secret around here.  He also explained that 1/3 of all our plant foods are helped by birds, insects, bees and other things in nature.  We saw how decaying logs turn into dirt and how the worms leave piles on top of the ground that in turn, help the soil.  They were many plants I found interesting, but the some I found most interesting were “Sweet Sicily”, (which smelled like licorice), “Spice Bushes”, and “Garlic Mustard”.  I took many pictures and kept notes so I could try to remember them all.

Norma
« Last Edit: June 17, 2010, 06:03:31 PM by norma427 »
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Offline norma427

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Finally some of my tomatoes are starting to ripen.  I only had a few grape tomatoes that were ripe a few weeks ago.  I think it will take quite awhile for my San Marzano tomatoes to ripen.

Norma
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Offline apizza

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This company, Baker Creek Seed Co
http://rareseeds.com/
 just bought the local seed company, which was closed, in Wethersfield, CT. The name will remain, Comstock Ferre, which was started in 1820. They opened July 6 and are wasting no time fixing up the place. Staff will wear period attire. There is a press release under blogs, Comstock Ferre, on the first page of Baker Creek.
I am looking forward to checking them out and very happy they are bringing back this wonderful site in Old Wethersfield. Hopefully it will be my best place to buy seeds.

Offline norma427

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apizza,

Thanks for sharing this site.  It looks like this site has loads of different kinds of Heirloom seeds to buy. There are so many kinds of tomato seeds to purchase. I never saw so many varieties before   :o I really like old world kinds of seeds or plants. I am also interested in the Wild Zaatar Oregano.  I have been trying to find a different kind of Oregano and this might be what I am looking for.  It is a little to late to start from seed in my area, but I will definitely keep this site in mind for next year. I also look forward to purchasing some seeds for next year. I just bought an Oregano plant at Home Depot that does taste different and am going plant that to see what happens.

Thanks for posting this. I appreciate your help,  :)

Norma
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Offline Randy

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Finally some of my tomatoes are starting to ripen.  I only had a few grape tomatoes that were ripe a few weeks ago.  I think it will take quite awhile for my San Marzano tomatoes to ripen.

Norma

Norma, what tomato type is that in the picture?

Randy

Offline norma427

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Norma, what tomato type is that in the picture?

Randy

Randy,

Those tomatoes in the picture are Jet Star.  They are the one kind sold at Washington Boro at the Tomato Barn.  Go down in this link to see what kind of tomatoes they grow. http://thetomatobarn.com/seasonal%20hours%20tomatobarn.com.htm#Tomato

They are very juicy, have the best tomato flavor, firm when cutting, good for just eating plain, or when used in something like a salad.  I already had 3 BLT’s from them. 

Norma
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Offline norma427

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We finally are getting some rain in our area  It has been dry here for awhile and the farmers crops in the fields, are looking poor. All our grass was getting so brown. You can tell how dry it is here because all the sweet corn and feed corn leaves are very pointed and stretching up to the sky.  Their growth has been stunned some from the dry weather.  In our area all the farmers say the corn should be “knee high, by the fourth of July”.  This year this spring and summer have been warmer, so the corn and tomatoes had a better start. The wheat fields have been cut down now.  They were so beautiful, when the waves of grain, blew in the breeze.  Years ago, when I was a teenager, I worked on farms to get some extra spending money. My parents gave me money, but taught me if you wanted extra money, you had to work for extras.  That was when they had real migrant workers.  The farmers would pay to have the people flow here and would house them on their properties.  I remember feeling badly for them, because some of the migrant people that helped to harvest the crops had to live in railroad cars or shacks and they didn’t have running water or toilets. I worked beside many, and although I couldn’t speak their languages they were nice people.  I wasn’t rich, but in comparison to them, I sure wouldn’t have wanted to have to live like they did.  I picked potatoes and other produce at farms.  That was back breaking work. You got paid by how many baskets you picked. Of course the migrant workers were much faster than I was. I was only a teenager, but would ride my bike to the farms and then ride back when I was finished.  My back was always aching.  I also suckered tobacco.  I remember when the guys would throw those nasty tobacco worms on me.  They were really big and green. Yuck!  :-D

At least I have well water, which I use to water my plants.  These are some pictures taken this morning of my different San Marzano tomatoes.  The last picture is of the San Marzano tomatoes I started from seed and didn’t think would make it.  At least they have grown. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10762.msg97105.html#msg97105

Norma
« Last Edit: July 10, 2010, 08:52:50 AM by norma427 »
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Offline Randy

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Thanks Norma, great link.  I will try them next year.

Randy