Author Topic: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?  (Read 25098 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2010, 04:05:49 PM »
I think my wife is using Johnny's organic seeds.

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/



pcampbell,

Thanks for sharing where your wife gets the organic seeds.  :)

Norma


Offline mmarston

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2010, 10:42:51 PM »
The mother of all heirloom seed sources.

http://www.seedsavers.org/

Tomatoes only
http://www.tomatofest.com/

Good general source.
http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/GP/homepage/page1

I would not recommend  growing San Marzano tomatoes in a non Mediterranean climate.
Look for varieties that match your climate and growing season.
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Offline norma427

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Re: Best Places people on this forum have found to buy Seeds or Perennials?
« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2010, 11:03:05 PM »
The mother of all heirloom seed sources.

http://www.seedsavers.org/

Tomatoes only
http://www.tomatofest.com/

Good general source.
http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/GP/homepage/page1

I would not recommend  growing San Marzano tomatoes in a non Mediterranean climate.
Look for varieties that match your climate and growing season.

mmarston,

Thanks for the sources for heirlooms, tomatoes and general sources.   :)

I never tried the San Marzano tomatoes, but thought I would give them a try this year, to see what happens.  I did purchase some tomato plants, but have about a month until I can safely plant them outside.  I am going to a place that sells heirloom plants.  Will see what I can find there this year.

Norma


Offline norma427

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I saw on Facebook last evening that Landis Valley Museum was having a plant sale of leftover plants from their Heirloom Plant Project.  It said all their plants were 1.00.  I went there this morning and purchased different varieties of tomatoes and some other heirloom plants.  Then I went to another place that sells heirloom plants and purchased some different kinds of basil, Greek oregano and some other plants.

Pictures below are of the plant wagon at Landis Valley Museum and the different plants I purchased today.

Norma

Offline norma427

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Steve (Ev) gave me some tomato plants this past Tuesday, that he started from seed.  He gave me Amish Paste, Margherita, Super Marzano, Hung Italian, E Wonder and Viva Italiano.  Looks like I am going to be busy with tomato plants this summer.  Has anyone tried these different varieties in sauces they make for pizzas or even sauces they make for pastas?  First picture is of Steve’s plants he gave to me.

At least my San Marzano tomato plants I started from seed awhile ago, are finally staring to grow.  Last picture is of two of the plants.  Looks like Steve is a better gardener than I am.

Norma

Offline beeftime

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If you are around  Mt. Laurel NJ there is a place called Springville Orchard and Herbary.

It's run by a very knowledgeable person and has almost every kind of herb imaginable.

Offline norma427

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If you are around  Mt. Laurel NJ there is a place called Springville Orchard and Herbary.

It's run by a very knowledgeable person and has almost every kind of herb imaginable.

beeftime,

Thanks for telling me where there is a good place to purchase herbs.  I can't remember at this moment, but think that is where Bob went to purchase his Oregano.  I live in Lancaster County, Pa., so NJ is a drive for me.

Norma

Offline norma427

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Some of my tomato plants are finally getting tomatoes on them.  The ones I started from seed are in the second picture the first four plants. I first started the San Marzano’s from seed around the end of March. I never thought they were going to get big.  The third picture is some of the other tomato plants.  The Jetstar and grape tomato plants also are getting tomatoes on the plants. Now to wait and see how they all taste.  I think I have 23 tomato plants.  ::)

I went on a Scentous Walk this morning and found out so much about wild plants that are native to our area and the smells that have.  There is a park called Central Park on the other side of Lancaster.  It has 544 acres. The park is all in its natural state. A Naturalist took us on the walk and showed us how many plants have smells you never thought they would.  http://www.co.lancaster.pa.us/parks/site/default.asp
If anyone lives around this area this park and programs are usually for free and the best kept secret around here.  He also explained that 1/3 of all our plant foods are helped by birds, insects, bees and other things in nature.  We saw how decaying logs turn into dirt and how the worms leave piles on top of the ground that in turn, help the soil.  They were many plants I found interesting, but the some I found most interesting were “Sweet Sicily”, (which smelled like licorice), “Spice Bushes”, and “Garlic Mustard”.  I took many pictures and kept notes so I could try to remember them all.

Norma
« Last Edit: June 17, 2010, 06:03:31 PM by norma427 »

Offline norma427

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Finally some of my tomatoes are starting to ripen.  I only had a few grape tomatoes that were ripe a few weeks ago.  I think it will take quite awhile for my San Marzano tomatoes to ripen.

Norma


Online apizza

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This company, Baker Creek Seed Co
http://rareseeds.com/
 just bought the local seed company, which was closed, in Wethersfield, CT. The name will remain, Comstock Ferre, which was started in 1820. They opened July 6 and are wasting no time fixing up the place. Staff will wear period attire. There is a press release under blogs, Comstock Ferre, on the first page of Baker Creek.
I am looking forward to checking them out and very happy they are bringing back this wonderful site in Old Wethersfield. Hopefully it will be my best place to buy seeds.

Offline norma427

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apizza,

Thanks for sharing this site.  It looks like this site has loads of different kinds of Heirloom seeds to buy. There are so many kinds of tomato seeds to purchase. I never saw so many varieties before   :o I really like old world kinds of seeds or plants. I am also interested in the Wild Zaatar Oregano.  I have been trying to find a different kind of Oregano and this might be what I am looking for.  It is a little to late to start from seed in my area, but I will definitely keep this site in mind for next year. I also look forward to purchasing some seeds for next year. I just bought an Oregano plant at Home Depot that does taste different and am going plant that to see what happens.

Thanks for posting this. I appreciate your help,  :)

Norma

Offline Randy

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Finally some of my tomatoes are starting to ripen.  I only had a few grape tomatoes that were ripe a few weeks ago.  I think it will take quite awhile for my San Marzano tomatoes to ripen.

Norma

Norma, what tomato type is that in the picture?

Randy

Offline norma427

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Norma, what tomato type is that in the picture?

Randy

Randy,

Those tomatoes in the picture are Jet Star.  They are the one kind sold at Washington Boro at the Tomato Barn.  Go down in this link to see what kind of tomatoes they grow. http://thetomatobarn.com/seasonal%20hours%20tomatobarn.com.htm#Tomato

They are very juicy, have the best tomato flavor, firm when cutting, good for just eating plain, or when used in something like a salad.  I already had 3 BLT’s from them. 

Norma

Offline norma427

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We finally are getting some rain in our area  It has been dry here for awhile and the farmers crops in the fields, are looking poor. All our grass was getting so brown. You can tell how dry it is here because all the sweet corn and feed corn leaves are very pointed and stretching up to the sky.  Their growth has been stunned some from the dry weather.  In our area all the farmers say the corn should be “knee high, by the fourth of July”.  This year this spring and summer have been warmer, so the corn and tomatoes had a better start. The wheat fields have been cut down now.  They were so beautiful, when the waves of grain, blew in the breeze.  Years ago, when I was a teenager, I worked on farms to get some extra spending money. My parents gave me money, but taught me if you wanted extra money, you had to work for extras.  That was when they had real migrant workers.  The farmers would pay to have the people flow here and would house them on their properties.  I remember feeling badly for them, because some of the migrant people that helped to harvest the crops had to live in railroad cars or shacks and they didn’t have running water or toilets. I worked beside many, and although I couldn’t speak their languages they were nice people.  I wasn’t rich, but in comparison to them, I sure wouldn’t have wanted to have to live like they did.  I picked potatoes and other produce at farms.  That was back breaking work. You got paid by how many baskets you picked. Of course the migrant workers were much faster than I was. I was only a teenager, but would ride my bike to the farms and then ride back when I was finished.  My back was always aching.  I also suckered tobacco.  I remember when the guys would throw those nasty tobacco worms on me.  They were really big and green. Yuck!  :-D

At least I have well water, which I use to water my plants.  These are some pictures taken this morning of my different San Marzano tomatoes.  The last picture is of the San Marzano tomatoes I started from seed and didn’t think would make it.  At least they have grown. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10762.msg97105.html#msg97105

Norma
« Last Edit: July 10, 2010, 08:52:50 AM by norma427 »

Offline Randy

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Thanks Norma, great link.  I will try them next year.

Randy

Offline norma427

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Thanks Norma, great link.  I will try them next year.

Randy

Randy,

Your welcome, anytime.  Those other tomatoes that the "Tomato Barn" sells are also very good.  I have one plant of the Sunbrite planted, but that plant doesn't have any tomatoes that are ripe at this time.  When they ripen, I will post a picture of what they look like.

Norma
« Last Edit: July 10, 2010, 09:07:49 AM by norma427 »

Offline Randy

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There site was down this morning but I have them bookmarked for next year.  Neat place.

Randy


Offline norma427

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Randy,

Tonight and next Saturday, Washington Boro holds their annual Tomato Festival.  I guess this page was from another year, but if you look on the left you can see how to grow tomatoes, growing tips, planting and other helpful information. That place gets packed and the star of the Festival is the Tomatoes.  If you look down in this link, you can see how great the tomatoes look.  They grow them in river dirt and in my opinion that makes them better.  We used to take our concession trailer to that event.  It kept us hopping. Washington Boro is famous for its tomatoes.  They make the best tomato sandwiches.  They are just bread, mayonnaise, lettuce and tomatoes with added salt and pepper.  Each year I used to each about 5 tomato sandwiches.

http://www.everything-tomatoes.net/washingtonborotomato.html

Norma

Offline Randy

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If I can get the plants next year I sure will give them a try.  There are so many variates out there, it gets hard to choose.  Always good to get a good recommendation and with pictures.

Randy

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apizza,

Thanks for sharing this site.  It looks like this site has loads of different kinds of Heirloom seeds to buy. There are so many kinds of tomato seeds to purchase. I never saw so many varieties before   :o I really like old world kinds of seeds or plants. I am also interested in the Wild Zaatar Oregano.  I have been trying to find a different kind of Oregano and this might be what I am looking for.  It is a little to late to start from seed in my area, but I will definitely keep this site in mind for next year. I also look forward to purchasing some seeds for next year. I just bought an Oregano plant at Home Depot that does taste different and am going plant that to see what happens.

Thanks for posting this. I appreciate your help,  :)

Norma

Norma, stuck my head in the door at Comstock Ferre today. They are starting to stock seeds. Over 200 varieties of tomatoes so far. Wow! I also saw the Wild Zaatar oregano you mentioned. The packet says it probably grew wild in ancient Israel and Jordan.
Work is going on around the compound. Old floors are being exposed, etc. They do have a web site here http://www.comstockferre.com/
I'll try to post how it all turns out this fall. I think I'll have quite a selection of seeds available next spring.

Offline Ronzo

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Just saw this thread. I purchased my fall garden seeds from Seed Savers Exchange http://www.seedsavers.org

They offer non-GMO non-hybrid seeds and many certified organic seeds. I have a few friends who deal with them exclusively and they come highly recommended. They also offer many transplants, but you have to put in your order in early for those.

While they offer memberships, like a co-op, you don't have to be a member to buy from them
« Last Edit: July 12, 2010, 11:52:16 AM by Ronzo »
Fuggheddabowdit!

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Offline norma427

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apizza,

Wow, your are lucky to live near Comstock Ferre.  ;D Over two hundred varieties of tomatoes is really a lot.  I had looked at the website you had referenced before and I saw some of the different kinds of tomato seeds they have or might have until next year.  Their stores sounds great.  I like anything old and also like to try and do things the old-fashioned way the best I can.  After I looked at that Wild Zaatar oregano, I also thought how old of a strain it might be.  I appreciate you helping me find old or heirloom seeds or for anyone else that might be searching for something different.  Please post again, when you find out more.

Thanks,  :)

Norma

Randy,

This picture is for you to see what real Washington Boro tomatoes look like.  I purchased some for a Caprese Salad.  These are the real thing and they are Jet Star.  They are so flavorful and juicy.

Norma
   
Ronzo,

I looked at part of their catalog and they also have so many different kind of seeds.  ;D I see they have the Greek oregano I might be looking for.  It looks bushy and fuzzy.  I also see they have many varieties for tomatoes.  I am going to have fun next year from choosing from this site, also.  This coming spring I will map out my strategy, and hopefully the seeds will grow.

This also looks like a great site for me or other members to buy seeds or transplants.

Thanks for taking the time to post this site,  :)

Norma

Offline Bob1

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Norma,
I have the Za'atar.  It is more of a cross between oregano and thyme.  I was watching the Primal Grill and I heard that there is a restaraunt in Israel that serves Za'atar pita bread with wood smoked egg pate, and it is very good.  I tried smoking some eggs this weekend but the wood burned up a little quick and they only had a slight flavor.  The TV recipe called for pita Za'ater, but the bread recipe called for Marjoram, oregano, and thyme.  I can only assume the TV cook did not want to specify Za'atar and changed the ingredient to what people have.  The guy on TV oiled the pita, then herbed, and then grilled.  I saw recipes on the net that call for adding the Za'atar to the bread before baking.  He then dipped the bread in the pate.  You may want to do a search for some recipes.  I plan on trying it when my Za'atar matures.

Bob

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Norma,

Your salad... is making my mouth water... I bet it tastes better than it looks.



Seed Savers Exchange has a boatload of tomato varieties. Check out their pepper varieties too. I bought some chocolate bell peppers and I can't wait to plant those suckers and taste the fruit. I also bought the Speckled Roman and the Austin's Pear tomatoes. Looking forward to harvesting these puppies.
Fuggheddabowdit!

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Offline norma427

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Bob,

That good to hear the Zaatar is a cross between a oregano and thyme.  I do like thyme, so maybe that would be interesting.  The Za’atar pita bread also sounds great and grilling would make it better in my opinion.  I will search for some recipes next year when I can buy some of that oregano.  I don’t have access to any now.

Thanks for your information,  :)

Norma

Ronzo,

The salad was only spinach, seedless cucumbers, Jet Star Tomatoes, and mozzarella. I forgot to add the basil, but the spinach tasted good.  It only took about 10 minutes to cut up.  I usually use Chef Tim’s Sweet Balsamic Vinaigrette on the salad.  He has a stand at market and I really like his vinaigrette.  http://www.cheftimfoods.com/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=6&vmcchk=1&Itemid=6     http://www.cheftimfoods.com/  This is a little about him. He is a funny, crazy guy. You can buy it online if you want to try it. Some of his recipes.

http://www.cheftimfoods.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=3&Itemid=5

Chef Tim is a graduate of Pennsylvania Institute Culinary Arts in Pittsburgh, PA. He has worked and served his unique Balsamic Vinaigrette recipe during his positions as Chef at the Pentagon in Washington, DC; at the Wyndam Gardens Setac Hotel in Seattle; Highmark Blue Shield in Camp Hill, at the Nationwide corporate offices café in Harrisburg, and at the GlaxoSmithKline complex café in Marietta, PA. Chef Tim learned ethnic cooking as a specialty cook at a Jewish fraternity house at the University of Maryland, and working at a wonderful Tratteria.
After numerous customer comments that his customers would love to buy his dressing if it were bottled, Chef Tim decided not to dismiss the plethora of requests and started Chef Tim Foods in November, 2008. Tim’s has received People’s Choice Awards for his “Burning Desires” chili at the Pennsylvania Chili Cook-Off. In 2000 won 1st Place in the Pennsylvania Salsa Contest and was asked to represent his state in Reno, NV at the National Salsa Cook-off.
Tim is working on bottling more products. In the works are: Honey Mustard dressing, Oriental Sesame/Pineapple dressing, Burgundy Wine Marinade & Glaze, and a Fish seasoning.

I will check out the peppers for next year.  I wonder how those chocolate peppers are going to taste. Sounds interesting. Let us know what they taste like.  I only planted one pepper plant this year, but might try more next year.  I also would like to see what the Speckled Roman and the Austin's Pear tomatoes look like how you would describe their taste.

Thanks again,  :)

Norma