Author Topic: Bread Machine's Yes or No???  (Read 1683 times)

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Offline Artale

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  • I Love Pizza!
Bread Machine's Yes or No???
« on: March 16, 2005, 01:05:46 PM »
Lucky for me i have many of the available ingredients to make
pizza right in my back yard due to my location on Long Island.
My family is from Bushwick Brooklyn and Queens and Italian food
has been the foundation of family life.

I started making pizza a couple of years ago with marginal success but
since i have found this forum i see that the flour being used is the
foundation of pizza making.  My first question is will there be a difference
in using a bread or (dough machine) vs making the dough by hand.  If so what
are the differences and what should i concentrate on?

Second Question: with all the available flours i can purhase which ones would
you start with as a base Neapolitian / New York style pizza?

Some of the flours i can get:

Trump  high glut  general mills
Bel Aria   00 pizza
Caputo   00 pizza
Delverde
I have and Italian Pork store that can import from italy basically
any product.



Where should i start? 

(By the way my wife thinks i'm crazy. She doesnt understand because she is a jewish woman from the Bronx)


Thanks for your help in advance!

Artale



Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Bread Machine's Yes or No???
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2005, 03:26:42 PM »
Artale,

Welcome to the forum.

As between making a dough by hand and a bread maker, I would personally choose hand kneading. But it all depends on what kind of dough and how much of it you plan to make. Hand kneading doughs with high-gluten flour is harder to do than lower gluten flours, and especially if you plan to make a lot of dough, say, for several pizzas. Under those circumstances, either a stand mixer or food processor will do a better job.

I have experimented with making a NY style dough using a bread machine and reported on the results at Reply #51 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=576.msg5486#msg5486. You might find it useful to read that posting if for no other reason than to get a feel for some of the potential problems in using a bread machine to make pizza dough (as opposed to bread dough). You might also want to take a look at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,937.0.html inasmuch as there was additional discussion there about using bread machines to make pizza dough.

As for flours to use to make NY style and Neapolitan style doughs, you have access to some of the better ones. The best high-gluten flour in my opinion for NY style doughs is the King Arthur Sir Lancelot flour, but you are unlikely to get it from your local sources (it may be worth inquiring however). The General Mills All Trumps flour is a good alternative for the NY style if you can't locate the KASL locally. Reportedly, Dom DeMarco of DiFaras's uses the All Trumps flour for his doughs, in combination with either the Delverde 00 flour or, if recent information is correct, the Caputo 00 pizzeria flour (the flour in the blue bag.) The Caputo and Delverde 00 flours are good flours to use for Neapolitan style pizzas because they both have relatively high protein levels. However, as between the two, the Caputo 00 flour appears to be much more popular among professionals for Neapolitan style pizzas. The Bel Aria 00 flour is also a good flour, but it is not nearly as popular as the other 00 flours among professionals, no doubt because it is relatively low in protein and gluten and doesn't tolerate long fermentation times as well. But I have had very good success with it in making pizzas where time is a factor and I don't need a long fermentation time. If you do site searches under the names of all the flours mentioned above you will find a treasure trove of information and experiences on all of the flours.

As for the starting point, you may want to think about what style of pizza most interests you and pick a good flour and a good recipe (of which there are many at this forum) and forge ahead. Good luck.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 16, 2005, 03:32:55 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Artale

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  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Bread Machine's Yes or No???
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2005, 03:35:21 PM »
Artale,

Welcome to the forum.

As between making a dough by hand and a bread maker, I would personally choose hand kneading. But it all depends on what kind of dough and how much of it you plan to make. Hand kneading doughs with high-gluten flour is harder to do than lower gluten flours, and especially if you plan to make a lot of dough, say, for several pizzas. Under those circumstances, either a stand mixer or food processor will do a better job.

I have experimented with making a NY style dough using a bread machine and reported on the results at Reply #51 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=576.msg5486#msg5486. You might find it useful to read that posting if for no other reason than to get a feel for some of the potential problems in using a bread machine to make pizza dough (as opposed to bread dough). You might also want to take a look at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,937.0.html inasmuch as there was additional discussion there about using bread machines to make pizza dough.

As for flours to use to make NY style and Neapolitan style doughs, you have access to some of the better ones. The best high-gluten flour in my opinion for NY style doughs is the King Arthur Sir Lancelot flour, but you are unlikely to get it from your local sources (it may be worth inquiring however). The General Mills All Trumps flour is a good alternative for the NY style if you can't locate the KASL locally. Reportedly, Dom DeMarco of DiFaras's uses the All Trumps flour for his doughs, in combination with either the Delverde 00 flour or, if recent information is correct, the Caputo 00 pizzeria flour (the flour in the blue bag.) The Caputo and Delverde 00 flours are good flours to use for Neapolitan style pizzas because they both have relatively high protein levels. However, as between the two, the Caputo 00 flour appears to be much more popular among professionals for Neapolitan style pizzas. The Bel Aria 00 flour is also a good flour, but it is not nearly as popular as the other 00 flours among professionals, no doubt because it is relatively low in protein and gluten and doesn't tolerate long fermentation times as well. But I have had very good success with it in making pizzas where time is a factor and I don't need a long fermentation time. If you do site searches under the names of all the flours mentioned above you will find a treasure trove of information and experiences on all of the flours.

As for the starting point, you may want to think about what style of pizza most interests you and pick a good flour and a good recipe (of which there are many at this forum) and forge ahead. Good luck.

Peter


Peter,

thank you for your help and incouragement.
My 4 children love eating pizza and the know how to
make it in your own kitchen is a joy!

I will continue to pursue this quest.

thanks again


 

pizzapan