Author Topic: Sourdough starter  (Read 10962 times)

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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #25 on: April 26, 2010, 12:42:52 AM »
Mike, just wanted to confirm your findings about this particular starter and crust coloration.  I have only baked a few times with this particular starter and have noticed that it gives a deeper/darker crust coloration compared to my original starter. 
  Of course my method of baking is not consistent so that may also explain the differences.  I usually bake at a stone temp of 650-700 for 2 minutes.  I then take the pie up with the metal peel and angle an edge close to the top burner while it's running to darken the edge.  I rotate the pie and repeat until I get a golden brown color.  Often the thin walled big air bubbles on the top crust will burn.  So the inconsistency in my method is that I don't time the process of darkening the rim so realistically the time difference may be greater than I realize.  I usually darken the rim to just shy of charring if I can.  Of  course the bubbles get burnt but that is a sacrifice I'm willing to take.  So it's done by "feel" sort of speak and by visualization.
   I did note that when I did a starter challenge, both Gotrocks SD starter and your Raisen SD gave a similar and darker crust coloration compare to my own starter.  I know you've seen the pictures, but for those that haven't, they can be seen here..
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10811.0.html

Oh one more thought.  I was also surprise to get the coloration I did with GR's and the raisen starter b/c I used AP flour in the formulation for the purpose of testing crust coloration.   Using my own starter in the past, i would always get a much lighter looking crust when using AP flour b/c of the lower protein content.  I thought using AP for this test would accentuate the differences if there were any.  And that it did.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2010, 12:44:40 AM by Tranman »


Offline Essen1

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #26 on: April 26, 2010, 02:40:14 PM »
TM,

From your findings it sounds like GR's starter and the SD starter perform in almost the same way. It would be interesting to see how both turn out if the baking regimen would be more consistent.

How was the taste?
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #27 on: April 26, 2010, 03:07:09 PM »
TM,

From your findings it sounds like GR's starter and the SD starter perform in almost the same way. It would be interesting to see how both turn out if the baking regimen would be more consistent.

How was the taste?

Both tasted great.  Had nice flavor even after 1 day of ferment (8 hours room, 12 hours cold) due to the high starter amount 25%.  Both behave very similarly but had their differences.  The raisen start had a more sour taste and was just slightly breadier.  I bet if I lower the starter amount I  could get the texture I like. 

I'll redo the test this coming week with one batch of dough and then divide and add the starters. 

« Last Edit: April 26, 2010, 03:09:59 PM by Tranman »

Offline GotRocks

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #28 on: May 13, 2010, 05:20:53 PM »
Any updates on the culture I sent out to you guys? how is it doing? any new statements or findings?

I just made a batch of sourdough pancakes with my culture on Monday, they rocked!! But I also had my own home-cured and smoked bacon to go with it, and locally produced maple syrup from this years sap collection too.
it was very nice treat to have after our cold weekend with the 4 inches of snow that we got.
A skinny cook is not to be trusted!

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #29 on: May 13, 2010, 05:31:17 PM »
GR, i've been using your SD Culture more than my own and the raisen one. It has good leavening and a great taste.  Last weekend I used it to make some really awesome waffles.

I made a batch of dough last night and use the raisen starter for a  taste test.  I'll post some pics in a day or so.

Offline GotRocks

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #30 on: May 14, 2010, 03:18:21 AM »
GR, i've been using your SD Culture more than my own and the raisen one. It has good leavening and a great taste.  Last weekend I used it to make some really awesome waffles.

I made a batch of dough last night and use the raisen starter for a  taste test.  I'll post some pics in a day or so.

I am glad to hear it. How was the texture on those waffles? I bet they were a bit on the rubbery side compared to a typical waffle. Well maybe not rubbery, just not as crisp and flaky as a typical waffle. I have always loved the flavor of that culture.
There is a long history with that starter, I am glad I could share it with some people that could appreciate it.
My pizza plans are done for this year, I never did get the financing I needed to get my WFO delivered and to do my leasehold improvements so we are going with "Plan-B" right now,  That means we are operating as a BBQ place only, But maybe we will have a spectacular summer and I will be able to self-finance and go back to plan-A starting in our slow springtime up here when most other places just close for a month.
A skinny cook is not to be trusted!

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #31 on: May 15, 2010, 08:04:29 AM »
GR, honestly they were the best waffles I've made and had.  I think I could have done it with any of my starters but I happened to be using the "GR starter".  Not at all rubbery and crispy and very light on the inside.  The look of the crumb was different than a normal waffle.  The crumb structure looked more like sourdough bread instead of the "white" bread look where the cell structure is uniform and tight.  I'm making them again this morning and see if I can't get a picture up.

Here's last night's pie with only 5% raisen starter.  This was another "experiment" thus the low starter %.  It was baked in my experimental outdoor ceramic oven.


Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #32 on: May 15, 2010, 10:14:43 AM »
TM,  that pizza looks right,  was that a room temp ferment?  -marc

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #33 on: May 15, 2010, 10:22:08 AM »
TM,  that pizza looks right,  was that a room temp ferment?  -marc

Thanks Marc.  What makes you suspect that it was a room temp ferment?  Any telling signs or just an overall "feeling" that you get?  Or was it the 5% starter that gave it away?

Yes it was suppose to be a 24 hour room temp ferment.  I put it into the fridge after about 18 hours at room temp of 72F.



Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #34 on: May 15, 2010, 12:59:35 PM »
TM,  just the percent of starter  looks great to me.  -marc

Offline DenaliPete

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #35 on: August 22, 2010, 08:04:32 PM »
Essen do you mind posting the  quantities of sugar and water you used with this method?

I am very intrigued and had two fruits in my garden to choose from to attempt a starter.  I decided to go with tomatoes instead of the strawberries, just a gut decision. 

I used two tomatoes, a cup of warm water, and 1 teaspoon of sugar. 

I'd prefer though to know what is recommended from the book you have.

Thanks,

Peter

Offline Essen1

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #36 on: September 15, 2010, 11:51:34 PM »
Essen do you mind posting the  quantities of sugar and water you used with this method?

I am very intrigued and had two fruits in my garden to choose from to attempt a starter.  I decided to go with tomatoes instead of the strawberries, just a gut decision. 

I used two tomatoes, a cup of warm water, and 1 teaspoon of sugar. 

I'd prefer though to know what is recommended from the book you have.

Thanks,

Peter

Peter,

I apologize for the late reply but I just saw your question...

The quantities are as follows:

3/4 cup (4oz) seedless organic raisins
2 tsp natural cane sugar
1 cup filtered water

Those are the ingredients to get the fermentation started of the raisins so you can use the liquid later on.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

buceriasdon

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Re: Sourdough starter from raisins
« Reply #37 on: September 20, 2010, 06:23:58 PM »
I my started my raisins soaking Sunday morning at 10 AM. Picture taken at 4PM Monday. Essen, I used 1 cup water, .75 cup raisins, and 2 tsp. sugar. Right? I wonder if I should transfer to a larger bowl and add water. I looked again at your photos and it doesn't look like you used as many raisins.
Don
« Last Edit: September 20, 2010, 06:33:34 PM by buceriasdon »

Offline Essen1

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Re: Sourdough starter from raisins
« Reply #38 on: September 20, 2010, 06:56:06 PM »
I my started my raisins soaking Sunday morning at 10 AM. Picture taken at 4PM Monday. Essen, I used 1 cup water, .75 cup raisins, and 2 tsp. sugar. Right? I wonder if I should transfer to a larger bowl and add water. I looked again at your photos and it doesn't look like you used as many raisins.
Don

Don,

The quantities look fine with me. I'd use a bigger bowl, though, but no more water.

Mike
Mike

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buceriasdon

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Re: Sourdough starter from raisins
« Reply #39 on: September 20, 2010, 07:26:02 PM »
Thanks Essen, Done.
Don

Don,

The quantities look fine with me. I'd use a bigger bowl, though, but no more water.

Mike

Offline Essen1

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Re: Sourdough starter from raisins
« Reply #40 on: September 20, 2010, 07:29:44 PM »
Thanks Essen, Done.
Don


Keep us posted, Don.  :)
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline RusticCajun

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #41 on: January 25, 2011, 12:46:28 PM »
I tried this approach last week.  (Actually, I followed the recipe that Pete-zza had posted a while back which is pretty similar.)  After the first 48 hrs, it seemed like things were working.  There was a fermenty smell and I was surprised that by the amount of bubbles coming up.  Success!

.... Well...  I then noticed that my raisins had a small layer of fur on them.  I assume this means the bad guys won -- is that true?  I tossed it out.

To prepare for this experiment, I had cleaned a glass bowl with hot water.  I used California organic grapes, bottled water, and turbinado sugar.  I covered it tightly with plastic wrap.  I set it in the oven very close (too close?) to the light, with the oven light on the whole time.

What else should I have done?  My second-guessings:  Should I have rinsed the grapes first?  Do I need to sterilize the glass bowl?  (Didn't know how to do that -- I didn't want to see the bowl shatter from heat.)  Does light affect the process -- should I have kept the bowl further from the light?  And I also wonder if was hotter than 80 deg very close to the light.  Maybe that sped up / ruined the process.

This was my first attempt with this approach.  A while ago, I tried twice to create a starter only from flour, and ended up with the same furries on the dough each time.  Argh.

Any help to avoid the furries is appreciated!
-Rustic


Offline plainslicer

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #42 on: January 28, 2011, 08:12:15 PM »
I am doing this right now, and it just became bubbly yesterday morning. This is my second try. I started on Sunday morning, and by Monday night it was furry. Thing is, the first time I haphazardly added raisins and water until it looked similar to the pictures, and didn't add sugar. It molded over and I threw it out. The second time I used the measurements buceriasdon used (with sugar) and it's now working well. I didn't sterilize anything though I had just washed the bowl and measuring cup with regular detergent.

There's some weird stuff that comes off of the raisins which I think is normal. I was afraid of it during the first days of the second try, but when it was starting to look suspect I stirred it a bit with a metal spoon. It's the stuff in the skins, I think. Stirring it spread it around, and I'm not sure it had any effect.

I'd say try again with regular raisins. FYI, my kitchen is super hot in the winter thanks to my building's heating system. The raisins are at 82F according to my IR thermometer. It's out in normal light. I used raisins I bought at Trader Joe's. I don't think they are organic.

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Sourdough starter
« Reply #43 on: February 03, 2011, 11:12:13 AM »
i just started this.

it's a duel in the next week between my OJ/lemon starter, and the raisin starter.   (cue in banjos)
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