Author Topic: Making the dough - newbie alert!  (Read 1531 times)

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Offline --b--

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Making the dough - newbie alert!
« on: April 15, 2010, 12:01:52 AM »
Hi guys

well ive been looking about these excellent forums for a few days now and i always see people posting their 'ingredient specifications' which i think come from the calculator on this site?

what i cant seem to find is a detailed set on instructions for actually turning these ingredients into a dough? does something like this exist?

im guessing theres many many different methods that people use however if someone can point me in the general direction id be very grateful!

i plan on making my dough with a kitchenaid mixer if that makes a difference. and initially id probably like a rather quick recipe so probably not an overnight fermentation if possible.

any assistance at all would be greatly appreicated!

Cheers!
B


Offline --b--

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2010, 12:09:46 AM »
well amazingly after reading for 2 days ive stumbled accross what i think im after immediately after posting this thread! lol

i just found a detailed set of instructions that Pete-zza wrote based on Tom Lehmanns style

however i notice that its best to leave this to ferment for at least a day.

are there recipes that allow only a couple of hours fermentation or am i kidding myself and if i want the real-deal should i be fermenting overnight?



Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2010, 12:54:37 AM »
-b- don't be dismay if it takes awhile to get answers.  Most ppl that read the posts may not have the answer or one that makes sense to you and the experts don't always answer right away.  I think they really have to be in the mood.   :-D

If you want a dough ready to be used the same day, it's rather simple.  Take any recipe and up the yeast.
You are right, that most recipes on here are written for a 24hour period to 4-5 days in the fridge.  I'm currently working on a recipe to be release sometime this weekned or next week that will simplify pizza making and allow for a pie in about 6 hours.  It just needs a bit more testing first. 

That is the minimal time that I could reccommend at this point.  You can shoot for a 4 hour time interval from prep to bake but I think 6 is a good start.  Take any recipe and use 1/2 tsp of ADY/IDY per about 300gm doughball (12" pie).  Some recipes off the net will call for even more yeast but it's really  not necessary.  They will call for about a tsp of yeast per pie.  These are the recipes that tell you to add a packet of yeast per recipe for 3-4 small pies. 

If using ADY, you'll want to mix it in warm (bottled/filtered) water and let it sit for 5 min to froth up before using (esp if planning to bake in 6 hours time).  After you mix up your dough, divide it and ball them up.  Place on a lightly oiled container and cover with a piece of plastic wrap.  Allow to sit at room temp (70-75F) until ready to bake.  Have your oven preheated 1 hour prior to baking.  You'll want to stretch and create a pizza skin when the oven is ready.   Good luck and post up some pics.

Offline --b--

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2010, 01:55:55 AM »
Thanks for the reply Tranman! Much appreciated..

Well ive been reading and reading these forums and i had a feeling the longer fermentation time seemed to be the norm. Like you said, ive seen lots of recipes on the net which talk about using a 'packet' of yeast and these seem to be done and ready to put in the oven in a few hours tops.

Whats the difference in results between these types of quick methods and the longer refrigerator fermentation methods?

Im so impressed with the pictures ive seen on this site i think ill be doing myself a disservice if i opt for a rushed 'instant' approach. im starting to think i may just have to plan my pizza eating a lttle further in advance so i have a dough ball in the fridge ready to go when its time to eat!

thanks again!

Offline tzoavva

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2010, 06:42:22 AM »
--b-- check out a couple of recipes I found on this site and have tried that are a bit on the quicker side:


Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza (emergency 2hr dough)http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg66312.html#msg66312
<< Reply #52>>

Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone (8hr fermentation)
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg59357.html#msg59357
<<Reply #24>>


and there is another one for 12 hrs
Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone (12hr fermentation)
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg59762.html#msg59762
<<Reply #30>>

All are good recipes but obviously the longer the fermintation the better the dough comes out in taste.  Right now in my fridge I finally have tackled the Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone (5 day fermentation)  that I have been meaning to try for several weeks. 

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg58197.html#msg58197
<<Reply #2>>

There lots of great recipes on this board to try an experiment so pick one and just start trying things out.  By the way the first one I tried out was Randy's American Style Pizza [http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2150.0.html] and got hooked :)  I think after the 5 day ferm pizza I will start exploring Neapolitan Style.  I just got my pizza stone in the mail and also found caputo 00 flour so I am all set to travel to the other half of the world....well at least in regards to pizza styles :)

Joanna
« Last Edit: April 15, 2010, 06:46:14 AM by tzoavva »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2010, 10:13:24 AM »
Thanks for the reply Tranman! Much appreciated..

Well ive been reading and reading these forums and i had a feeling the longer fermentation time seemed to be the norm. Like you said, ive seen lots of recipes on the net which talk about using a 'packet' of yeast and these seem to be done and ready to put in the oven in a few hours tops.

Whats the difference in results between these types of quick methods and the longer refrigerator fermentation methods?

Im so impressed with the pictures ive seen on this site i think ill be doing myself a disservice if i opt for a rushed 'instant' approach. im starting to think i may just have to plan my pizza eating a lttle further in advance so i have a dough ball in the fridge ready to go when its time to eat!

thanks again!

The longer fermentation times does improve the taste and texture.  At some point the taste becomes more and more of a sourdough taste.  Some ppl really love this and others (like me) not as much.  It's all a matter of personal preference.  You should experiment and see for yourself what you prefer.   Aside from taste, the texture also changes from a soft white bread like texture to something more of an artesian bread.  A little chewier and slighty dryer.   You can also offset the dryness by tweaking the hydration rate.
That's only my observation and I may be wrong about that.  My best pies have ranged from a same day pie (what you want to do) all the way to a 3 day cold ferment.  5 days is my limit for taste and texture tho, but that's just me.

Be warned that pizza making is a strongly addicting habit especially if you get into the details of it.
I'm just a beginner but having fun. 

Good luck and don't forget to post up some pics.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2010, 10:47:09 AM »
B,

I prepared a collection of pizza dough recipes intended to be used to make short-term doughs, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8297.0.html.

Peter

Offline --b--

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2010, 06:40:38 PM »
Thanks so much for the replies guys

im starting to warm to the idea of perparing the dough a few days in advance and just whipping it out of the fridge when its time to prepare/cook.

although its also great to know theres the quicker variety doughs too because when the pizza craving comes on i dont wanna be left with no alternatives!

im hoping to tackle my first pizza on the weekend so if i manage something to be proud of ill certainly post up the pics!

(btw: ive never heard the term 'pie' when referring to pizza before? is this an american thing? all the way down here in australia we only ever call it pizza!)

cheers
B

Offline tzoavva

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2010, 07:20:27 PM »
Wow Peter that list is awesome.  Must now plan out my next Pizza adventure now....jeez thanks :) I agree this stuff is totally addictive but it is also fun to see the difference each recipe makes with just some minor changes.

Offline DanTheMan

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2010, 07:23:48 PM »
are there recipes that allow only a couple of hours fermentation or am i kidding myself and if i want the real-deal should i be fermenting overnight?

I made a fantastic pizza yesterday in just about one hour, as I have done many times before. Now mind you the dough has a bit of a bread texture to it, but they still are good.  I didn't even have time to get the scale out!

3 - cups KABF
~250ml warm water
2 tsp TDY
1 tbl olive oil
1-tsp sugar
1-tsp minced garlic :o

Cooked at 500F for around 15 minutes, it had a great spring to it.

It definitely can be done, not to the pizza perfectionist, but great for a quick great tasting dinner.

Cheers!


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Making the dough - newbie alert!
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2010, 08:01:31 PM »
Wow Peter that list is awesome. 

Joanna,

I'm glad you like the collection. Making a few emergency type doughs is a pretty good place to start, especially for newbies, before moving on to doughs that are fermented for much longer times. That process provides a good comparison of the results using both approaches. There is clearly a difference but it still comes down to personal preference and personal taste. We have members who make only emergency doughs and we have members who never make them.

Peter


 

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