Author Topic: ADY and IDY what is the difference?  (Read 3677 times)

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Offline Artale

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ADY and IDY what is the difference?
« on: March 24, 2005, 09:42:14 AM »
I buy, I beleive active dry yeast in a jar made by fleischmann's.

It is a dry granular yeast that after 1st use must be put in the fridge.
It says for best use let the amount you use come to room temp.

My question is what is the difference between active and instant Dry Yeast???



Online Pete-zza

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Re: ADY and IDY what is the difference?
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2005, 10:13:02 AM »
Artale,

Active dry yeast (ADY) is a finely-divided, dehydrated form of compressed yeast. The conventional method of using this form of dry yeast is to rehydrate it in warm water, at around 105-115 degrees F, for about 5-15 minutes, before combining with other dough ingredients.

By contrast, instant dry yeast (IDY) (sometimes called “bread machine yeast”) does not require proofing in water or any other liquid. These yeasts have more active cells than ADY and are made up of finer yeast particles. They are also of a different strain than ADY and, when combined with flour and other dry ingredients, can also tolerate higher rehydration temperatures than ADY (120-130 degrees F), which promotes faster rising. To further speed up the action of IDY, and to strengthen the dough (by preventing the gluten bonds from breaking down), a small amount of ascorbic acid, or Vitamin C, is usually combined with the yeast to stimulate the yeast.

While some professional and home bakers makers choose to proof IDY, usually in water, it is not really necessary. It can simply be mixed in with the dry ingredients (flour, etc.).  Alternatively, IDY can be added to a dough mixture shortly after the beginning of the mixing process. It is also not necessary to defrost IDY if it has been frozen. By the time you are ready to use it in a recipe, the yeast should be ready.

Unlike fresh yeast, which is highly perishable and has a very short shelf life, measured in days, both ADY and IDY have long shelf lives. ADY has a shelf life of about 1 year if the package is unopened (and not refrigerated), and 6 months if tightly resealed and refrigerated after opening and, for added protection, stored in an airtight container. If frozen (also in an airtight container) ADY will last almost indefinitely (although yeast producers usually recommend a much shorter time period—about a year).  IDY also has a good shelf life, about 2 years if the package is unopened (and not refrigerated), and 6 months if tightly resealed and refrigerated after opening and, for added protection, stored in an airtight container.  If frozen (also in an airtight container) the instant dry yeast will last almost indefinitely (although yeast producers usually recommend a much shorter time period—about a year).

Another difference between IDY and ADY is that you don't need as much IDY to produce the same leavening effects as ADY. If you look at the label on your yeast bottle or package, you should see the equivalencies. It should read something like this:

One packet of active dry yeast = 1/4 oz. = 2 1/4 t. = 1 (0.6-oz.) fresh compressed yeast cake = 1 1/2 t. instant dry yeast.

Peter

Offline Artale

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IDY and ADY whats the difference?
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2005, 12:13:44 PM »
I use active dry yeast from fleischmann's.
Its in a jar and its granular that you put in the fridge.

what is instant dryed yeast than ??


Offline dinks

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Re: IDY and ADY whats the difference?
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2005, 12:33:10 PM »
ARTALE:
  GOOD MORNING. THE aCTIVE YEAST IS OF THE TYPE YOU MUST ADD APPROX. 105 DEGREE WATER TO IT TO ACTIVATE IT. THE INSTANT TYPE YOU JUST MIX IT IN WITH THE FLOUR INTO YOUR MIXING BOWL ADD WATER & MIX. THERE WEIGHTS ARE SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT BUT UNLESS YOU ARE MAKING A GREAT MANY PIES AT ONE TIME I WOULD NOT BE CONCERNED WITH IT. HAVE A NICE DAY MY FRIEND.
   ~DINKS..

Offline dankfoot

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Re: IDY and ADY whats the difference?
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2005, 12:57:01 PM »
So which kind should we use? I have always used the active dry?

Offline dinks

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Re: IDY and ADY whats the difference?
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2005, 01:22:07 PM »
DANKFOOT:
  Good Morning. Of course that is a personel choice. However, using the instant yeast benefits 2 ways. One, the cost is much less. 2nd, the ease of use. All you do is mix the instant yeast into the mixer bowl together with the flour & continue with the recipe. Have a nice day my friend.
   ~DINKS.

Offline dankfoot

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Re: ADY and IDY what is the difference?
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2005, 02:06:43 PM »
dinks,

Thanks for the answer. And thanks for being such a nice guy. Seams like everything you say just has a nice attitude to it.

Offline Artale

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Re: ADY and IDY what is the difference?
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2005, 03:09:27 PM »
Artale,

Active dry yeast (ADY) is a finely-divided, dehydrated form of compressed yeast. The conventional method of using this form of dry yeast is to rehydrate it in warm water, at around 105-115 degrees F, for about 5-15 minutes, before combining with other dough ingredients.

By contrast, instant dry yeast (IDY) (sometimes called “bread machine yeast”) does not require proofing in water or any other liquid. These yeasts have more active cells than ADY and are made up of finer yeast particles. They are also of a different strain than ADY and, when combined with flour and other dry ingredients, can also tolerate higher rehydration temperatures than ADY (120-130 degrees F), which promotes faster rising. To further speed up the action of IDY, and to strengthen the dough (by preventing the gluten bonds from breaking down), a small amount of ascorbic acid, or Vitamin C, is usually combined with the yeast to stimulate the yeast.

While some professional and home bakers makers choose to proof IDY, usually in water, it is not really necessary. It can simply be mixed in with the dry ingredients (flour, etc.).  Alternatively, IDY can be added to a dough mixture shortly after the beginning of the mixing process. It is also not necessary to defrost IDY if it has been frozen. By the time you are ready to use it in a recipe, the yeast should be ready.

Unlike fresh yeast, which is highly perishable and has a very short shelf life, measured in days, both ADY and IDY have long shelf lives. ADY has a shelf life of about 1 year if the package is unopened (and not refrigerated), and 6 months if tightly resealed and refrigerated after opening and, for added protection, stored in an airtight container. If frozen (also in an airtight container) ADY will last almost indefinitely (although yeast producers usually recommend a much shorter time period—about a year).  IDY also has a good shelf life, about 2 years if the package is unopened (and not refrigerated), and 6 months if tightly resealed and refrigerated after opening and, for added protection, stored in an airtight container.  If frozen (also in an airtight container) the instant dry yeast will last almost indefinitely (although yeast producers usually recommend a much shorter time period—about a year).

Another difference between IDY and ADY is that you don't need as much IDY to produce the same leavening effects as ADY. If you look at the label on your yeast bottle or package, you should see the equivalencies. It should read something like this:

One packet of active dry yeast = 1/4 oz. = 2 1/4 t. = 1 (0.6-oz.) fresh compressed yeast cake = 1 1/2 t. instant dry yeast.

Peter

THank you Peter !

Your allways a wealth of info and i greatly appreciate it!!   :D

Offline Artale

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Re: IDY and ADY whats the difference?
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2005, 03:13:29 PM »
ARTALE:
  GOOD MORNING. THE aCTIVE YEAST IS OF THE TYPE YOU MUST ADD APPROX. 105 DEGREE WATER TO IT TO ACTIVATE IT. THE INSTANT TYPE YOU JUST MIX IT IN WITH THE FLOUR INTO YOUR MIXING BOWL ADD WATER & MIX. THERE WEIGHTS ARE SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT BUT UNLESS YOU ARE MAKING A GREAT MANY PIES AT ONE TIME I WOULD NOT BE CONCERNED WITH IT. HAVE A NICE DAY MY FRIEND.
   ~DINKS..

Dinks  thank you for the info sir !!!