Author Topic: Duplicating a crust like i Fratelli or Campisi's in the Dallas area  (Read 4465 times)

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Offline katef

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While this is not my favorite type of crust, my dear friend loves this crust and I'd like to make him happy by learning how to make it.

The crust is really thin and crispy, but I don't know if can be called a cracker crust, per se, but is definitely closest to that.  Any ideas are welcome and I look forward to experimenting.

http://www.ifratelli.net/pizza/  this link will take you to a picture of the pizza I'm hoping to duplicate.

Thanks!

Kate


Offline Mad_Ernie

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Kate:

The photos from the website help.  It looks like what I would consider to be a cracker-style crust.  You might try DKM's most recent recipe, found here:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9389.0.html

Judging by the photos, I would say low hydration is a definite key component.  Instead of a cutter pan, though, my recommendation would be to use a pizza stone and peel for ensuring crispness.

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

Offline katef

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Thanks for the suggestion.  I have made a few of the cracker crusts on the site, but have found them to be the most challenging, so I stopped for awhile, but those I made I always did in a cutter pan.

I'll break out the stone, which I hardly ever use since I have to heat it up so much and we're in Texas, so it's already hot.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Kate:

A few quick tips or suggestions.

1. Fat is key component in these doughs, whether it is vegetable oil, butter, lard, or something else.  If you are finding the low hydration difficult due to needing Popeye arms to roll it out,  :-D then I would suggest tweaking a preferred recipe by up-ping the fat content, like say from a 2% to 2.5 or even 3% ratio to the flour.

2. Some folks use bread flour or high-gluten flour, but for a true cracker crust I prefer all-purpose flour.  That will also help in the hydration process due to the absorption of the water by the lower protein flour.

3. Use a food processor to mix the ingredients.  It's easier than a mixer (in my opinion).

4. Refrigerate the dough overnight and let it sit out for at least 2 hours the next day before rolling it out.

5. You might also consider some dough conditioner or dough relaxer if rolling out the dough is still too stressful.  You can find these types of products at places like prepared pantry.
http://www.preparedpantry.com/
Let them eat pizza.

Offline katef

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Ernie, thanks for the suggestion on the fat content. 

When attempting cracker crusts before, I took the advice from a different thread of putting the dough in a proofing box to make it easier to roll out, which has worked very well in the past, and I can further justify creating the proofing box. :)

I almost exclusively use King Arthur flours, which if I can trust Cooks Illustrated, has a higher gluten content in their AP flour than other brands, do you think I need to get a different all purpose flour?  I kind of hope not, because I'm already a little appalled at the number of flours I typically keep on hand.

I definitely agree with using a food processor, in fact, I had lived most of my life without a food processor and it's the cracker crust that made me finally break down and get one.

I will also take the refrigeration advice, I think in the past I have rolled it out before storing it in the fridge.

I've never tried dough conditioner, I'll take a look at it.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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I almost exclusively use King Arthur flours, which if I can trust Cooks Illustrated, has a higher gluten content in their AP flour than other brands, do you think I need to get a different all purpose flour?  I kind of hope not, because I'm already a little appalled at the number of flours I typically keep on hand.

No, stay with what you have.  The King Arthur flour works well.  I know all too well about what you mean in referring to a multitude of flours.

The proofing box is an excellent device.  Use it in good health. :-D

-ME
Let them eat pizza.