Author Topic: My WFO project  (Read 10794 times)

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Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2010, 11:47:56 AM »
I'm going to leave it on their because its welded to the bottom of the oven. Plus if I took it off I would have to have something to take its place to keep the height I want. The fence was easy, my uncle just pulled it out with his botcat, took like 2 minutes. Only thing that sucks is that now our lawn is messed up again from heavy machinery. Can't wait till this thing is done so I can finally use it.

You guys have WFO's so lemme ask you a question. Should I build the fire up or should I just build it big from the start?


Offline Matthew

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2010, 11:52:48 AM »
I'm going to leave it on their because its welded to the bottom of the oven. Plus if I took it off I would have to have something to take its place to keep the height I want. The fence was easy, my uncle just pulled it out with his botcat, took like 2 minutes. Only thing that sucks is that now our lawn is messed up again from heavy machinery. Can't wait till this thing is done so I can finally use it.

You guys have WFO's so lemme ask you a question. Should I build the fire up or should I just build it big from the start?

I have tried both & prefer to go big from the start as I can get it to 950+ within 2 hours.


Offline BrickStoneOven

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« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 01:44:50 PM by BrickStoneOven »

Offline Matthew

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #23 on: June 16, 2010, 03:38:10 PM »
I got this from Ambrogi.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=gmail&attid=0.1&thid=12940cb1d32eb0c9&mt=application%2Fpdf&url=https%3A%2F%2Fmail.google.com%2Fmail%2F%3Fui%3D2%26ik%3D076b322d8a%26view%3Datt%26th%3D12940cb1d32eb0c9%26attid%3D0.1%26disp%3Dattd%26zw&sig=AHIEtbR5vDtZraYloGuDR4Qap8dxPe87lw&pli=1

Read page 6 and 7. Where can I get fire retardant glass wool or stone wool. Would they have it at home depot?

I can't open the link.  I'm assuming you want to insulate the door.  Roxul is Mineral Wool & is fire retardant.  You should be able to pick it up at Home Depot in the insulation aisle.

Matt

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #24 on: June 16, 2010, 03:54:23 PM »
This is what it says.

"Mod Mec80 is a raw oven to be walled up. Place the oven on the masonry support. The height of the opening(generally 1500-1200 mm from the ground) will increase if a base board is installed.

The oven is not insulated. External steel surface can reach a temperature of over 200C. Use a thick later of glass wool, rock wool all around the external structure (6/8cm) and on the top (10/12 cm). Once insulated, you can finish the external mansonry wall.

It is essential to maintain a clearance space between the oven and the ceiling to access the flue connection.

If the oven is installed outdoors, it must be sheltered."

Thanks for the help Matt.

Offline Matthew

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #25 on: June 16, 2010, 05:22:34 PM »
This is what it says.

"Mod Mec80 is a raw oven to be walled up. Place the oven on the masonry support. The height of the opening(generally 1500-1200 mm from the ground) will increase if a base board is installed.

The oven is not insulated. External steel surface can reach a temperature of over 200C. Use a thick later of glass wool, rock wool all around the external structure (6/8cm) and on the top (10/12 cm). Once insulated, you can finish the external mansonry wall.

It is essential to maintain a clearance space between the oven and the ceiling to access the flue connection.

If the oven is installed outdoors, it must be sheltered."

Thanks for the help Matt.

Got it.  Is the hearth insulated?  If not, I highly recommend that you do.  The easiest way is to use 2" thick high heat insulation board.  It will require you removing the oven from the skid & sitting atop the board. As far as insulating the exterior goes, you can wrap it in a ceramic blanket (about 3" thick will be best) & another 3" of matrilite.  The other easier option is vermiculite.  I'm not sure exactly how or how much, you'll have to aske someone who went that route.   I used the 3 layers of ceramic blanket & then another 3" of matrilite to form the shape of my oven

Matt

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #26 on: June 16, 2010, 07:26:53 PM »
It doesn't say anything about insulating the bottom, only the side and top. So I'm assuming the bottom is insulated. It looks like it is though, that's what they would put the bricks on right? I was thinking of wrapping with the stuff from home depot and putting more on the top to. Then just have my uncle build around it.  
« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 07:35:57 PM by BrickStoneOven »

Offline Matthew

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #27 on: June 16, 2010, 07:39:32 PM »
It doesn't say anything about insulating the bottom, only the side and top. So I'm assuming the bottom is insulated. It looks like it is though, that's what they would put the bricks on right? I was thinking of wrapping with the stuff from home depot and putting more on the top to. Then just have my uncle build around it.  

I would double check.  Insulating the hearth is as important as insulating the dome.  You want to make sure that your oven is well insulated or the temperature will drop as quick as it rises.

Matt

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #28 on: June 16, 2010, 08:08:40 PM »
I just emailed them and asked if the bottom of the oven was insulated internally. Maybe Marc can chime in a little since he used it before. I remember he told me the next day the oven was still really hot.

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #29 on: June 16, 2010, 08:19:00 PM »
Hey guys,  It definately is well insulated as its like 6 inches thick I believe.  Also some rapid fire pies were a non issue.  I am curious what amrogis answer would be to the question though.  I honestly think they will say its all set.  Either way,  if not enough to to upset the balance of heat,  the more insulation the better usually.  Can't wait till you get rolling.-marc


Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #30 on: June 16, 2010, 10:06:33 PM »
It has to be insulated, I don't think those stones are 5-6 inch thick.

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #31 on: June 16, 2010, 10:48:50 PM »
I meant the whole floor. in total.  If I recall,  about 2 inches of stone is good and the rest is insulation.  If so that is in the ballpark.  But again,  the more the better.  -marc

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #32 on: June 17, 2010, 08:08:32 AM »
Yea, I was agreeing with you I think the way I wrote it sounded weird.

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #33 on: June 17, 2010, 11:47:03 AM »
I can't believe how much firewood is. One place with delivery is $300 that's 6-8 months seasoned. Another is $450 2yrs seasoned. Then their are the kiln dried woods that are $575.

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #34 on: June 17, 2010, 06:58:19 PM »
Just got these in today.

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #35 on: June 18, 2010, 08:44:06 PM »
I narrowed it down to two firewood suppliers. One supplier said his wood is seasoned for two years and its all oak. The second supplier said its Kiln dried but its mixed wood with mostly oak with some sugar maple,
red maple, yellow birch, wild cherry, beech. Does it matter what type of wood I burn? The second guy said because its kiln dried he can guarantee that the moisture content is going to be around 20-25% compared to wood that is seasoned outside in a pile where it could be around 40% even after a year or two. The first guy said his wood has been seasoned for two years, wouldn't that take out most of the moisture? If the type of wood doesn't really matter than I will probably go with the second guy since his wood would be drier than the other guy.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2010, 08:46:10 PM by BrickStoneOven »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #36 on: June 18, 2010, 10:27:31 PM »
Just got these in today.

Brickstone, you are livin' LARGE dude.  I can't tell you how envious I am of you right now.    ;D

I'm happy for you.

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #37 on: June 18, 2010, 10:46:22 PM »
Thanks man, hopefully this thing will be done by the end this week so I can get started. Plus everyone in my family is yelling at me to open the pool, I told them not until my oven is done. You would probably have an oven to if you didn't have a family. I'm 22 with no bills, I spend all my money from work on pizza. Its like the "Above The Influence" commercials, pizza is my anti-drug.

Offline Matthew

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #38 on: June 19, 2010, 06:07:24 AM »
I narrowed it down to two firewood suppliers. One supplier said his wood is seasoned for two years and its all oak. The second supplier said its Kiln dried but its mixed wood with mostly oak with some sugar maple,
red maple, yellow birch, wild cherry, beech. Does it matter what type of wood I burn? The second guy said because its kiln dried he can guarantee that the moisture content is going to be around 20-25% compared to wood that is seasoned outside in a pile where it could be around 40% even after a year or two. The first guy said his wood has been seasoned for two years, wouldn't that take out most of the moisture? If the type of wood doesn't really matter than I will probably go with the second guy since his wood would be drier than the other guy.

Tough call, my wood of choice is hickory followed by oak.  Maple is good but not as good as oak.  If it was all sugar maple that was kiln dried I would go with it but seeing as it's mixed, go with the oak.  You can tell how dry the wood is by how easy it splits.

Matt

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: My WFO project
« Reply #39 on: June 19, 2010, 09:08:20 AM »
For Matt.


 

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