Author Topic: no king arthur italian flour or double zero flour  (Read 4092 times)

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Offline quilterpuddy

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no king arthur italian flour or double zero flour
« on: March 24, 2005, 09:11:11 PM »
hi,

I can not find King Arthur Italian flour or double zero flour locally, what can I use inplace of these? I have been using regular all purpose flour, but I want a better taste to my dough..any suggestions?

thanks


Online Pete-zza

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Re: no king arthur italian flour or double zero flour
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2005, 10:21:48 AM »
There are some places that sell the Bel Aria 00 flour locally, but it will depend on where you live. The King Arthur 00 is not sold at the retail level. The Bel Aria 00 and King Arthur 00 flours are available via mail order, although I normally don't recommend the KA00 based on personal experience (it's a domestic clone of the imported variety). If you choose not to order those, you can try combining cake flour or white pastry flour (not whole grain pastry flour) with all-purpose flour. From my experience, a 3:1 ratio of all-purpose flour to cake flour, and a 2:1 ratio of all-purpose flour to pastry flour seems to work reasonably well, but you won't exactly replicate the 00 flour. But you should get a reasonable facsimile for your purposes. One combination that I like is a combination of bread flour and white pastry flour. The last time I used that combination was in the following recipe:

1/4 t. instant dry yeast (SAF Red brand)
1 1/4 c. lukewarm water (around 68-72 degrees F)
2 1/2 c. bread flour (King Arthur bread flour preferred)
1 1/4 c. white pastry flour (not whole grain pastry flour)
2 t. sea salt
Olive oil, for oiling the bowl

Mix the flours and the instant dry yeast in the bowl of a heavy-duty stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. Gradually add the water and mix the ingredients together until they come together in a rough dough mass. Knead the dough in the stand mixer until a dough ball forms around the dough hook. Add the sea salt and continue kneading until the dough is smooth, elastic and shiny, about 10-12 minutes at low speed. Put the dough ball into a very lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, and refrigerate for several hours, and preferably for 24 hours. If the dough is to be refrigerated much longer than this time, then it may useful to add a small amount of a sweetener (such as sugar) to the original dough ingredients to continue to feed the yeast during the prolonged period of refrigeration. When ready to use the dough to make pizzas, remove the dough from the refrigerator and divide into 3 or more pieces (or fewer for larger pizzas). Gently shape the individual pieces into round dough balls, place them on a lightly oiled sheet, and cover loosely with plastic wrap. Let the dough balls rise until about doubled in bulk, about 1 to 2 hours. Finish by shaping the dough balls into pizza rounds, and add the selected toppings. Bake each of the pizzas in turn on a pizza stone that has been preheated for 1 hour at the highest oven temperature possible (usually 500-550 degrees F for a home oven).

A recipe recommended by Pamela Shelton Johns, who wrote a book on Neapolitan style pizzas (Pizza Napoletana!), is this one:

1/2 cake compressed fresh yeast
2 c. warm water (80-90 degrees F)
1 c. pastry flour
1 1/2 T. sea salt
5 1/2 to 6 c. all-purpose flour

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, stir the yeast into the warm water until it dissolves. Add the 1 cup of pastry flour and the salt and mix well. Add the all-purpose flour one cup at a time, kneading until the dough is not sticky, about 10 minutes. Continue to knead for about 20 minutes longer, or until the dough is smooth and elastic.

For the first rising, shape the dough into a ball and leave it in the mixer or place it on a lightly floured work surface. Cover with a towel and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75 degrees F) for 4 hours.

Punch the dough down and divide it into 6 pieces. Form each piece into a ball. Cover with a towel and let rise in a warm (75 degrees F) draft-free place for 2 to 4 hours, until doubled. Makes enough for six 10-inch pizzas.


Peter


Offline quilterpuddy

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Re: no king arthur italian flour or double zero flour
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2005, 09:25:12 PM »
Pete,

thanks for the information and all the help, I will try this weekend, will keep you posted

lorraine


 

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