Author Topic: New mixer  (Read 5105 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #40 on: June 15, 2010, 11:39:32 AM »
Tran,

I believe it is largely a precautionary measure but based on some science. Having worked with pizza operators and having consulted in the industry for over thirty years, Tom no doubt has learned where most problems arise and, in general, how to solve or avoid them. That is perhaps why his advice on this subject is fairly generic. If pizza operators follow this piece of advice on dough tempering as well as his advice on pizza matters in general, they perhaps aren't going to have any problems with tempering and using their dough in line with his recommendations. That should mean fewer callbacks from pizza operators. If the operators are unaware of his advice or just choose to ignore it, for whatever reason, if Tom is brought in on the matter he is likely to steer them back to his generic advice. If he is dispensing advice for free, as he does at the PMQTT, then he may not have the time to probe the matter in intimate detail or engage in a lot of handholding. That said, however, Tom will frequently tell people that if what they are doing works, for whatever reason, they should continue to do it. For that reason, I don't think he would arm wrestle you because you let your dough warm up in many different ways and got satisfactory results.

The above aside, I am puzzled by your example where you proofed one of your dough balls at a room temperature of 76 degrees F for 5 hours and the finished dough temperature was 69 degrees F. If your dough ball came out of the refrigerator, and was not frozen, it is hard for me to see how the dough temperature didn't reach room temperature after five hours. I have conducted many informal tests on this subject before but I apparently did not keep my notes to be able to quote you specifics. Maybe sometime you can repeat that test.

Peter


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #41 on: June 15, 2010, 12:41:40 PM »
Thanks Peter.  It was puzzling to me too!  I do not make a habit of taking dough temps after proofing.  I only ran this little test to see if I could reproduce my 2 favorite pies of all time.  Both were rush proofed at high temps of above 100F for a very short amount of time.  I thought there was something to warm proofing no one else had tried. 

So I did the test to see if the resulting crumb structure would be dramatically different, but it was not.

My fridge temp is set to around 40F.  I normally keep the doughball in a glazed ceramic bowl, so it can retain cold temps for awhile even after removing from the fridge.   After I pulled the doughball out of the fridge I did transfer it to a room temperature bowl that was deeper b/c I was concerned the doughball would rise too high.  I uncovered the plastic wrap and covered it with a moistened towel.  I was surprise to find the doughball was still cool to the touch after 5 hours at a room temp of 76F.  I checked it several times with the thermogun and got the same reading.  I did not check it with a probe temp though. 

If I get around to doing the warm proof test again, I will update you. 

Online Pete-zza

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #42 on: June 15, 2010, 01:04:44 PM »
Tran,

When tempering, most professionals will leave the dough balls in the dough boxes or trays they were stored in although sometimes they will remove some of the dough balls and put them on their work surface to warm up more quickly, especially during peak times. Unless I want to delay the tempering process and to use the cold container to help do that, my usual practice is to remove the dough ball from its container, place it on my work surface (dusted with flour), and cover it with a sheet of plastic wrap so that the top of the dough ball does not dry out. It may be in your case that the damp towel kept the dough cooler than normal so it didn't approach room temperature as quickly. The damp cloth in effect increased the total mass that had to warm up. Tom's advice on tempering does not contemplate that people will do what you did with the damp towel.

Peter

brayshaw

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #43 on: June 16, 2010, 07:50:26 AM »
I am going to film myself mixing another batch of dough in my new mixer tonight and I am going to follow Terrys advice and add 70-80% of the flour and mix for 1-2 before adding the rest of the flour.
Is there any part of the mix that you guys want me to pay particular attention to with my camera?

Cheers,

Paul

Offline Trinity

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #44 on: June 16, 2010, 08:14:27 AM »
Just save some battery power for the pizza pictures. :)

 And some pictures of the cheese you use, and the other toppings. :)
« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 08:17:50 AM by Trinity »
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

brayshaw

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #45 on: June 16, 2010, 08:21:39 AM »
My photo camera uses batteries like their going out of fashion!
I will film myself actually making the pizzas tomorrow night too so you will get a good look at the pizzas and the produce I use.

Paul

Offline Trinity

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #46 on: June 16, 2010, 08:24:50 AM »
trin stays tuned. :pizza:
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

brayshaw

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #47 on: June 16, 2010, 04:34:30 PM »
Ok, so tonight I mixed a smaller batch (in my last video I used 5kg of flour) and in this video it was closer to 4kg.
I will make some pizzas tomorrow and I will get the other dough balls that I balled up in the fridge for a very long nap (3-6 days)

Again, please leave comments even if they are bad! :-D

Paul

Part 1:

Part 2:

There is even a special guest appearance!!!
« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 05:34:18 PM by brayshaw »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #48 on: June 16, 2010, 05:37:08 PM »
Paul,

Water at 45 degrees F is cold to yeast, and yeast does not like to be shocked, so I'd like to suggest that you add the yeast on top of the first tranche of flour. That way, if the phone rings after you have added the yeast to the water and before you add the first tranche of flour, you won't harm the yeast. It's one of those little habits that, once formed, can save you grief later on. In your case in the video, the yeast was only momentarily added to the cold water and you added the flour quickly thereafter so there shouldn't be any harm to the yeast or to the dough.

Peter

brayshaw

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #49 on: June 16, 2010, 05:40:43 PM »
Thanks Peter, I will make a mental note of that.

Paul


Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #50 on: June 16, 2010, 07:52:59 PM »
Good lookin dough once again.

brayshaw

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #51 on: June 18, 2010, 02:45:16 PM »
Guys, when I was mixing this last batch (see last video) towards the end of the mix I heard a fair bit of popping and I saw bubbles on the dough (source of the popping) is that normal? Did I over mix? I am making pizza tonight so I will get pictures.

Thank you,

Paul

Offline Matthew

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #52 on: June 18, 2010, 02:58:29 PM »
Guys, when I was mixing this last batch (see last video) towards the end of the mix I heard a fair bit of popping and I saw bubbles on the dough (source of the popping) is that normal? Did I over mix? I am making pizza tonight so I will get pictures.

Thank you,

Paul

Hi Paul,
Nice job on the videos.  I have never experienced any "popping" sound but it's likely the air that's being incorporated into the dough as it's mixing.  The best indicator is the window paining test, once you're there, then stop.  I mixed up a 2500 g batch of dough today & it took about 8 minutes with my spiral which has only 1 speed.


Matt

brayshaw

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #53 on: June 18, 2010, 03:11:12 PM »
Thanks Matthew, I am trying to really reduce my mix time. Can you do a video too?
Thanks buddy,

Paul

Offline Matthew

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #54 on: June 18, 2010, 03:47:07 PM »
Thanks Matthew, I am trying to really reduce my mix time. Can you do a video too?
Thanks buddy,

Paul

I will do one eventually; I promise.  One with Neapolitan Dough & one with NY.  I wanted to mix up a batch of Neapolitan dough today but we're going to get some t-storms tomorrow so I did up a batch of NY style instead. 

Matt

brayshaw

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #55 on: July 05, 2010, 03:27:50 PM »
Here are some pictures of pizzas I made last week using supermarket Canadian flour, these were 5 day cold fermented and were pretty tasty. :)

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #56 on: July 05, 2010, 05:11:21 PM »
Uhhh hello Paul. That pie looks excellent. I especially like the crumb structure, the rim, etc. It looks right to me. Good job. What was different about this mix, batch, bake?  And it tasted good? Is that our best pie you've made?

Offline norma427

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #57 on: July 05, 2010, 05:24:57 PM »
Paul,

Your pictures of the pizzas look delicious.  :)  I can imagine with a five day ferment the taste of the crust was great.  I like your airy rim.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

brayshaw

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #58 on: July 05, 2010, 05:32:46 PM »
Chau, thank you for the kind words! I used my standard mix/recipe/bake time:63% water, 2% salt and .50%IDY.
I preheated the stone at 220C for about 80minutes and then blasted the stone under the grill for 5ish minutes to get the stone temp up to 620F then I put the stone back in the oven and slid the pizzas straight on it for around 6-8 minutes. It had a great crunch/chew and tasted really nice.

The first picture of the topped pizza is my wifes pizza, it was topped with grilled courgettes, roasted red pepper and onion with mozzarella and blobs of local goats cheese.

I am a simple man...the other pictures are of my pizza, pepperoni/parmasan and mozzarella. thats it.
I have recently been trying a 30month matured Parmigiano Reggiano and it is to die for.

« Last Edit: July 06, 2010, 05:33:06 AM by brayshaw »

brayshaw

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Re: New mixer
« Reply #59 on: July 05, 2010, 05:36:43 PM »
Paul,

Your pictures of the pizzas look delicious.  :)  I can imagine with a five day ferment the taste of the crust was great.  I like your airy rim.

Norma

Thanks Norma! It was a really nice crust, I also prefer the smaller diameter pepperoni.

Paul


 

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