Author Topic: Pans: What I've learned. Pizzatools vs BakeDeco  (Read 1096 times)

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Offline hotsawce

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Pans: What I've learned. Pizzatools vs BakeDeco
« on: June 29, 2010, 05:27:40 PM »
Hopefully, this helps first time pan buyers.

So I ordered a steel BakeDeco pan, only to find it was not safe above 500 degrees. From what I understand, there is stuff on the pan that could be toxic. The website never specified this, so I'd avoid them at all cost.

For the PizzaTools pans, they don't recommend leaving an empty pan in the oven over 500 degrees, but from what the customer service rep said, they will hold up completely fine if you have dough or pizza in them and you don't totally overcook it because the pie drops the overall temp of the pan...they even said it could be used in Wood Fired Ovens.

Another nice thing, even in the unlikely event a pan had a complete melt down, the PizzaTools pan has nothing toxic in it, which is great to here. It's nice to know there's nothing toxic coating the pan or anything. Additionally, the aluminum is more conductive.

   In conclusion, if you want a pan avoid www.bakedeco.com I'm returning mine and getting a www.pizzatools.com pan. Oh, and I'm going to get a 12 x 8 pan; looks like it'll make a perfect, six slice sicilian.


Offline hotsawce

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Re: Pans: What I've learned. Pizzatools vs BakeDeco
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2010, 12:44:10 AM »
Also, I have a question for anyone willing to answer.

    Assuming non-stick properties are not important, can one make a sicilian in a regular, plain aluminum pan without any coating of any kind? Basically, is it safe at high temperatures? Also, does anyone even make a plain aluminum pan that isn't coated with anything?

Offline scott123

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Re: Pans: What I've learned. Pizzatools vs BakeDeco
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2010, 01:34:40 AM »
Hotsawce, I've said this elsewhere, but, for someone reading this thread, I think it bears repeating.  Although I think the pizzatools pans work well in other environments, I'm not sure they're the best choice for Sicilian.

I guess if someone didn't plan on baking Sicilian on a stone, then I think these would be an okay option, but for stone baking, I have my reservations- and I think most people are in agreement that you really want to do Sicilian on a stone.

When pizzatools calls their pans 'Heavy Duty' it's relative. Most pan thicknesses are specified by gauge. .063" (pizzatools pans) puts it at little thicker than 14 gauge.  This is thicker than your typical standard 18 gauge aluminum sheet pan, but it's thinner than 13 gauge pans on the market. All aluminum sheet pans will eventually warp, regardless of their thickness. When it does, you want as much metal as possible between the stone and the dough- the more metal, the further the heat will travel laterally, the more even the bake. I did a little looking around for a gauge thicker than 13.  I found a 12 gauge full sheet pan, but, unfortunately, it won't fit in a home oven. If someone made a 10 gauge (or thicker) aluminum half sheet pan, it would be a no brainer. Unfortunately, they don't.  Given the choice between a 14 gauge pan and a 13 gauge one, though, you definitely want the 13 (especially if it's less than half the price).

Color is integral for absorbing radiative (glowing) heat.  A stone doesn't really glow- you're pulling heat from it by way of conduction (contact), not radiation, so the color of the bottom of the pan will be relatively meaningless in a stone baking environment.

In other words, you're paying top dollar for a dark coating that isn't impacting baking and a pan that's thinner than others on the market.

This is one pan that I'd recommend:

http://www.katom.com/054-5314.html

As far as the safety of uncoated aluminum is concerned, there is no hard evidence whatsoever connecting aluminum baking pans with health issues.  Even if you do subscribe to what the tin foil hat folks are claiming, seasoning the pan will make it just as 'safe' as the pizzatools/pstk version.

This one here is anodized (non reactive aluminum):

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001337420/?tag=pizzamaking-20

It's 14 gauge as opposed to 13, but... the 2 inch sides and half inch lip may give it a little more structural strength and it might warp less.

Btw, even before you spend 20ish dollars on a pan, I'd find a local restaurant supplier and grab a lightweight pan in the 10 dollar range. Heat it up until it warps, let it cool, sprinkle it with an even coating of sugar and see how it bakes on the stone- any hot spots will brown/burn.

Lastly, the larger the pan the more tendency it will have to warp.  If you were willing to work with two smaller pans, you might get better results. Even dirt cheap pans, if they're small enough, probably won't warp.

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Pans: What I've learned. Pizzatools vs BakeDeco
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2010, 11:11:23 AM »
It's just so confusing. All I want to do is not poison my food  :-D

I don't have any problem whatsoever baking in uncoated aluminum.....I know it's much safer than the sketchy coatings many pans use. I've saved those links, so maybe I'll do some experimenting in the neat future.

The pizza tools pan I ordered is 12 x 8, so it's pretty small. I don't intend to do an entire bake on the stone. Rather, I'll be doing it in stages.

We'll see. I'll keep everyone updated with my results.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pans: What I've learned. Pizzatools vs BakeDeco
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2010, 11:31:41 AM »
Adding to what scott123 has already said, for those who are interested in Sicilian and "Sicilian Style" pans (which is what pizzatools calls them), see Reply 2 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9166.msg79294/topicseen.html#msg79294.

Peter

Offline scott123

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Re: Pans: What I've learned. Pizzatools vs BakeDeco
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2010, 01:00:07 PM »
The pizza tools pan I ordered is 12 x 8, so it's pretty small. I don't intend to do an entire bake on the stone. Rather, I'll be doing it in stages.

8 x 12? Yes, that's a different ball game.  For some reason I thought you were going the half sheet route. Yes, 8 x 12 might work nicely.