Author Topic: Making your own dough sheeter  (Read 57422 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Tatoosh

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 127
  • Age: 64
  • Location: Cordilleras of Luzon - Philippines
  • Munch Munch Munch
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #40 on: May 06, 2012, 11:29:30 AM »
The South African manual sheeter manufacturer, that Saturday Coffee found, replied to my email and their machine is a mere $1679.68 and another $1027.34 for shipping.

The pasta attachment to a Kitchen Aid mixer is looking better all the time.  However, the fruit press I saw on eBay really has me wondering if a small hydraulic car jack with a self-centering set of metal plates might not be a pretty feasible way to approach this.  Put the top pan on a ball joint, sliding guides on each corner to keep the plates aligned, it might just work.  Not real fast but with 5000 lbs of umph, it should flatten even the more recalcitrant doughs. 

On the other hand, I've been looking for an excuse to put a Kitchen Aid in my kitchen.     
Banana Ketchup Is Not Pizza Sauce - Weber 22.5 OTG, Smokenator 1000, Kettle Pizza Insert, White Mountain 6qt Elec, Cuisinart ICE-20 1.5qt, FMS 1500D sous vide - Mabuhay Pizza!

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #41 on: May 06, 2012, 11:45:53 AM »
I still insist that a press by itself will not work because of the dough's elasticity however I have built presses such as:
http://www.bonnydoonengineering.com/Products/Presses/110505.html
Now if you could find a way to heat the platens, then maybe it could work. For what it's worth I think building a roller/sheeter would be a better solution.
Don
« Last Edit: May 06, 2012, 11:47:26 AM by buceriasdon »

Offline Tatoosh

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 127
  • Age: 64
  • Location: Cordilleras of Luzon - Philippines
  • Munch Munch Munch
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #42 on: May 06, 2012, 10:48:54 PM »
Wow, nice design!  I'm impressed with that and the return springs built into the frame is a very nice touch indeed.  I should defer to your obvious expertise in design, of which I am not qualified by anything but curiosity.  So, with respect to my one redeeming qualification, what would you think the heat range of the platen be?  I suppose there might be a couple of ways to add heat, but getting it spread evenly across the surface of the plates ... err ... platen would be a challenge.  Heated water, a heating unit the same size?  A temperature controller or at least temp probe built in.  That $700 commercial unit is looking better all the time and the $160 add-on to a Kitchen Aid starts to seems economical! 

Thanks for you input, I appreciate it.
Banana Ketchup Is Not Pizza Sauce - Weber 22.5 OTG, Smokenator 1000, Kettle Pizza Insert, White Mountain 6qt Elec, Cuisinart ICE-20 1.5qt, FMS 1500D sous vide - Mabuhay Pizza!

Offline politon

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 59
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #43 on: May 15, 2012, 08:40:22 PM »
Perhaps a clay slab roller would work?

http://www.baileypottery.com/slabrollers/drd2.htm

Offline Jet_deck

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3044
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #44 on: May 16, 2012, 09:05:11 AM »
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Tatoosh

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 127
  • Age: 64
  • Location: Cordilleras of Luzon - Philippines
  • Munch Munch Munch
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #45 on: May 16, 2012, 09:10:15 AM »
I realize this topic is pretty old, but in case anyone is still interested in making their own dough sheeter, I found a place where you can purchase some instructions on making your own slip roll, which is a similar piece of equipment used for bending sheet metal. I haven't purchased the book or even used a slip roll, but I thought someone more mechanically inclined might give it a shot.

Dave

Dave, sounds interesting but do you have a book title or author?  The link you posted says the item (no name shown) has been moved and says to search for it.  
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012, 09:19:01 AM by Tatoosh »
Banana Ketchup Is Not Pizza Sauce - Weber 22.5 OTG, Smokenator 1000, Kettle Pizza Insert, White Mountain 6qt Elec, Cuisinart ICE-20 1.5qt, FMS 1500D sous vide - Mabuhay Pizza!

Offline JohnnyQuest

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 91
  • Location: Suffolk, VA
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #46 on: July 13, 2014, 09:04:56 AM »
Seems like this thread has gone cold.  Where did it end up?

I recently visited a place called Harper's in Charlotte, NC, and they used a dough sheeter and made a fantastically thin crust, which has me looking for one also. 

I'd like to buy this 16" one, but it's a bit too pricey:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/16-Inches-Dough-Sheeter-Pasta-Roller-Pizza-maker-16-/161364916880?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2592193a90

So I bought this 10" model for $99 instead:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/10-254mm-Dough-roller-sheeter-Pizza-pastry-roti-ravioli-dough-machine-equipment-/321448260699?ssPageName=ADME:L:OC:US:3160 

Offline bamboomagics

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2
  • Location: srilanka
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #47 on: July 17, 2014, 06:48:07 AM »
Hi all of you
sorry to question a bit aside of your pb but why do you want a dough sheeter since in Italy they apparently don't use them ?
I am asking because I am a pizza fan with no experience in making but only eating (!) : I bought a quite recent professionnal dough sheeter for 25% of its price (new is apparently around USD 4500 !) that was used in a bakery for making croissants and puff pastry). It is electric, very convenient apparently.... but now I am questioning myself why I bought it (!!! again) : can I really make thin, crousty pizza dough with that ? (like thin and cooked in wood oven) since the pros Italian don't bother using it !!??
If I really can I am planning to open a small restaurant as I live in Srilanka near the beach...
Thanks for your comments. :)

Offline DNA Dan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 833
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #48 on: August 02, 2014, 12:53:15 AM »
Different pizza styles require different techniques and tools. A sheeter is used to make a laminated style pizza or pastry. This typically involves a much lower hydration dough than you use for a NY or Neopolitan pizza. You'd probably be shot in Italy for using a sheeter to make pizza anyway.

Look in the "Cracker" pizza section for several examples of commercial and/or home efforts in making this style. That is what this style is referred to on this site. A more proper term for this style is "laminated crust."

Offline ChrisG

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 15
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #49 on: August 03, 2014, 12:03:55 AM »
So I bought this 10" model for $99 instead:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/10-254mm-Dough-roller-sheeter-Pizza-pastry-roti-ravioli-dough-machine-equipment-/321448260699?ssPageName=ADME:L:OC:US:3160
What do you think of the roller you purchased? Does it easily press out the dough or is it nearly as exhausting as rolling it out by hand?


Offline justapizzaguy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #50 on: February 17, 2015, 10:49:36 AM »
I did a Froogle search for "manual dough sheeter" and came up with one interesting return.  Unfortunately, it was a used item and was sold out, but it is just the sort of thing I think many of us would fork over $100 for.   In the meantime, I will keep thinking about building one.  Mark

http://www.acitydiscount.com/products/product_detail.cfm?InvID=40273&tablink=0

This was a Domino's Pizza unit from when they rolled out Pan Pizzas in the early Nineties.

Offline JohnnyQuest

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 91
  • Location: Suffolk, VA
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #51 on: February 17, 2015, 06:22:20 PM »
ChrisG,
Sorry for not seeing your post until now.  It isn't as easy as I had hoped.  The machine they used in Harper's was automated, and worked really well.  Hand cranking the unit I bought isn't anywhere near close. 


Here are some photos from the pizzas we had at Harper's where you can see the crust.  (I know, many of the pizza "purists" on here won't like the Toppings or the crust, but I thought they were an excellent change of pace).  To each his own.

Offline lc1064

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #52 on: February 23, 2015, 11:58:03 PM »
I can't believe there isn't really a sheeter out there on the market for home use. I've spent hours and hours looking online. I have also looked into the clothes wringers and clay rollers.

 I was interested in the model you got Johnny Quest. Thanks for letting us know how it worked for you. I finally settled on trying a pasta roller and piecing the sheets together, but it's kind of a pain and very time consuming. If anyone knows of any other viable options for under $500, I would love to know about it!

Offline Zensojourner

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 40
Re: Making your own dough sheeter
« Reply #53 on: March 05, 2015, 04:50:56 PM »
I had the same thought (finally) expressed by another poster - why not a slab roller?  Bailey's has a mini portable slab roller on sale for $245 right now.

http://www.baileypottery.com/slabrollers/drd2.htm

If that's a little too cheesy for you, Clay-King has the small Shimpo slab roller on sale for $470.

http://www.clay-king.com/clay_slab_rollers/shimpo_mini_slab_roller.html

Use a Teflon oven liner - or two, if necessary, with the dough sandwiched between - to keep the dough from sticking to the roller or the table.

What is it that you foresee as being problematic with using a slab roller?

Actually the more I think about it, the more I like the idea - this is probably the ONLY way I'd ever do a laminated dough of any sort.  Too lazy!   :P


 

pizzapan