Author Topic: Not Biscuit-Like, But a Real Biscuit Crust  (Read 1045 times)

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Offline IndyRob

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Not Biscuit-Like, But a Real Biscuit Crust
« on: July 08, 2010, 07:07:32 PM »
The Chicago Style forum description says "biscuit-like", and there are many references to "biscuit texture", but I searched the forum for "biscuit" and it didn't appear that anyone has ever used an actual biscuit dough (although I'm sure many have).  So I decided to try it.

As biscuits go, my favorite are those at Hardee's which I've never been able to adequately reproduce.  But that's not the sort of biscuit I imagined anyway.  So I searched my biscuit memory and recalled Red Lobster's Cheddar Bay Biscuits.  There are many copycat recipes online, but they're all basically the same: 2 Cups Bisquick, 1/2 to 2/3 cup milk/water, and a half cup of grated cheddar with some garlic butter brushed on.

I wound up using 1/4 cup heavy cream and 1/4 cup water (plus a little more when it appeared that it needed it) to simulate milk - which I didn't have at the time.  And I used a variation with dried parsley in the garlic butter.

It actually worked quite well.

I didn't take pics for two reasons.  First, the dough yield didn't seem that it was going to be enough for a 12" pan.  So I cut some corners (if that's possible with a round pan).  But in retrospect I think I could've gone thinner.  Second, I realized at the last moment that I had bought whole San Marzanos rather than crushed.  So they were haphazardly crushed at the last second.  The resulting pie wasn't very pretty.

But it was more than acceptable.  With some refinement, it could actually be very good.  But the real value is a way to make a Chicago Style pie from start to finish in under an hour.  The crust flavor we usually like to develop over time with slow fermentation is abandoned for direct flavorings.  The outer crust was a bit dry, but might be improved with some oil/shortening (I just found a variation of the biscuit recipe which includes a 1/2 cup of butter).



Offline vcb

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  • Location: Chicago
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Re: Not Biscuit-Like, But a Real Biscuit Crust
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2010, 07:45:58 PM »
The Chicago Style forum description says "biscuit-like", and there are many references to "biscuit texture", but I searched the forum for "biscuit" and it didn't appear that anyone has ever used an actual biscuit dough (although I'm sure many have).  So I decided to try it.

As biscuits go, my favorite are those at Hardee's which I've never been able to adequately reproduce.  But that's not the sort of biscuit I imagined anyway.  So I searched my biscuit memory and recalled Red Lobster's Cheddar Bay Biscuits.  There are many copycat recipes online, but they're all basically the same: 2 Cups Bisquick, 1/2 to 2/3 cup milk/water, and a half cup of grated cheddar with some garlic butter brushed on.

I wound up using 1/4 cup heavy cream and 1/4 cup water (plus a little more when it appeared that it needed it) to simulate milk - which I didn't have at the time.  And I used a variation with dried parsley in the garlic butter.

It actually worked quite well.

I didn't take pics for two reasons.  First, the dough yield didn't seem that it was going to be enough for a 12" pan.  So I cut some corners (if that's possible with a round pan).  But in retrospect I think I could've gone thinner.  Second, I realized at the last moment that I had bought whole San Marzanos rather than crushed.  So they were haphazardly crushed at the last second.  The resulting pie wasn't very pretty.

But it was more than acceptable.  With some refinement, it could actually be very good.  But the real value is a way to make a Chicago Style pie from start to finish in under an hour.  The crust flavor we usually like to develop over time with slow fermentation is abandoned for direct flavorings.  The outer crust was a bit dry, but might be improved with some oil/shortening (I just found a variation of the biscuit recipe which includes a 1/2 cup of butter).



On that same note, I once used those biscuits-in-a can you can get in the refrigerated aisle of your local grocery store.
Those don't work so well for deep dish, probably because they are meant to be fully baked in about 10 minutes when prepared normally.
They burned a bit on the bottom and the 'buttery' taste that the package promised was quite unpleasant after 30+ minutes in a deep dish pan.
-- Ed Heller -aka- VCBurger -- Real Deep Dish - Deep Dish 101
http://www.realdeepdish.com/
http://facebook.com/realdeepdish/
http://virtualcheeseblogger.com/


 

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