Author Topic: Inexpensive, but delicious pizza  (Read 356 times)

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Offline SLCpizzamaster

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Inexpensive, but delicious pizza
« on: October 10, 2014, 01:10:25 AM »
I have been on a journey to make amazing pizza at home AND make it inexpensive.
No 00 Caputo flour, no buff mozz, no san marzanos, etc.  If I can make my pizza 90+% as good for 1/5th the cost, that is my goal.  I know most everyone here wants to recreate a perfect Neopolitan pizza and I respect that.  I just can't aford that.

Here is my current breakdown:
I have my Margherita Pizza down to $.81 a pie
400g dough ball, local Lehi Roller Mill Flour
2 oz sauce, Kroger Tomatoe Sauce with seasonings added (no joke, great flavor)
3.2 oz mozz, Frigo mozz from Costco
Basil from my garden

Has anyone else found great ingedients that are inexpensive?  Please share what you do.




Offline Trinity

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Re: Inexpensive, but delicious pizza
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2014, 07:44:55 AM »
How about a nice picture of that $.81 cent pizza! :pizza:
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

Online pythonic

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Re: Inexpensive, but delicious pizza
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2014, 09:12:31 AM »
Are fuel costs factored in?
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline jsaras

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Re: Inexpensive, but delicious pizza
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2014, 09:17:25 AM »
The truffle salt that I put on top of my pizza skin costs about that much. 
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline cylint

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Re: Inexpensive, but delicious pizza
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2014, 11:27:32 AM »
thats about half the sauce and cheese i use. 

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Inexpensive, but delicious pizza
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2014, 02:17:02 PM »
I sure have. You have to buy the tomato sauce from Kroger, but when I make pizzas at home I always use nothing but slices of fresh, ripe tomato right from my garden, its a real treat during the summer and early fall months when I can go out and pick my sauce right from the vine and have it on the pizza skin in less than 5-minutes. My surplus tomatoes are either dried or scalded and pealed then processed through the food processor and frozen (seeds and all, and if you leave a little skin on the tomatoes all the better, that's where the flavor is at). When I make my pizzas this way the only change I make to my dough skin is to brush it VERY LIGHTLY with olive oil, then add my garden fresh basil and maybe a few oregano leaves, and chopped fresh garlic, then cover with the tomato slices (about 3/16-inch thick) then proceed with dressing the pizza in your normal manner. When using light amounts of cheese I find it beneficial to incorporate just a little Parmesan or Romano cheese for added depth and intensity of cheese flavor. You can also make a starter and keep it fed in the fridge so you don't even need to buy yeast if you don't want to.
One other thing, did you know that you can grow basil as a house plant during the winter months so you can have fresh basil all year around? We put out surplus basil in the food processor with a little olive oil and mix it into a puree which we then place into plastic tubs and freeze, during the winter months we just scoop out some of the basil puree and thaw it for use as we would fresh basil, or you can blend it with some Parmesan cheese and either pine nuts or walnuts to make a pesto for use on pasta. It's amazing how well you can eat from your own garden, and it really doesn't need to be a very large one either, we have turned to growing everything in recycled containers lined up along one side of our drive way (tomatoes, peppers, egg plant, basil, and onions makes for an attractive drive way edging, the oregano and garlic is planted in a raised bed behind the house. We almost lost the oregano due to drought and cold weather last year, but it has recovered nicely this year). Norma also does a lot of home gardening and might be able to add something too.
Tom Lehmann/ The Dough Doctor

Offline SLCpizzamaster

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Re: Inexpensive, but delicious pizza
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2014, 12:20:21 AM »
Tom, fresh ingredients are the best.  I am going to try and grow tomatoes next season.

No, fuel cost does not factor into the costs.

Here is a pic of a pepperoni pie cooked in my oven at 500 on convection.  I put the rack so the hot air blows over the pizza and it gives my crust a nice color.

Pepperonies are thinly sliced and large from the deli at 5 bucks a pound.  This probably adds another $.40 to the total cost.

I have tried many canned sauces and the Kroger one has the best tomato flavor out of 10+ different ones I tried.

Just wanted to start a conversation to see if anyone else had found good tasting ingredients for lower costs.