Author Topic: overnight risig dough on room temp vs overnight rising in refrigerator!  (Read 8014 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: overnight risig dough on room temp vs overnight rising in refrigerator!
« Reply #20 on: August 11, 2010, 11:24:57 AM »
gabaghool,

This is one of those cases where it is best that you pull up a chair and a few beers sometime and read the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.0.html. The biochemistry of long, cold-fermented doughs is very complicated, and it requires that one do some pretty unconventional things to be able to make a dough that can last up to 23 days in the refrigerator. I liken reading the above thread to getting a Masters or PhD in dough biochemistry with a little physics thrown in for good measure. But, to give you an idea of some long, cold-fermented doughs and the pizzas made from them, you might check out the photos in the following:

1) 5 1/2-7 days of cold fermentation: Reply 2 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg33253.html#msg33253

2) Approximately 10 days of cold fermentation: Reply 23 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg35370.html#msg35370

3) Approximately 12 days of cold fermentation: Reply 29 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg36081.html#msg36081 and Reply 123 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg65490.html#msg65490

4) 15 days of cold fermentation: Reply 57 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg40092.html#msg40092 and Reply 110 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg42160.html#msg42160

5) 23 days of cold fermentation: Reply 117 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg42556.html#msg42556

To the above, I will add that the pizza made from the 23-day old dough had some rather funky crust flavors. However, that pizza had some vinegar in the dough. All of the doughs had some odor of alcohol but not offensively so.

Pretty much all of the above experiments were with respect to the basic Lehmann NY style dough formulation, which is my main guinea pig when I conduct new experiments. However, when I was playing around with Papa John's clone doughs and pizzas, at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.0.html, I found that I could use ADY in dry, non-rehydated form, and get over 8 days of cold fermentation, and even longer had I chosen to do so. The results of that experiment are discussed at Reply 48 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg64308.html#msg64308.

Peter



 

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