Author Topic: Modified Ultra-Thin par-baked skin trying milk, vinegar and baking soda  (Read 4215 times)

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Offline norma427

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In trying a modified version of the Ultra-Thin par-baked skin, I would like to try using some KABF flour, some KA whole wheat flour, with KABF flour being the dominant flour.  At this point I am not sure if I want to use some kind of honey in the dough, but can get many organic varieties at market.  I would also like to use milk, probably 2% reduced fat milk, in combination with baking soda and vinegar.  I want to just use enough vinegar to sour or curdle the milk, then add the baking soda to this combination, until it foams and bubbles. I can use a little ADY or IDY.  I also would like to use enough salt in the formula to help give this par-baked skin a better taste, when baking it into a pizza.  I am going to use the same hydration and baking procedures as I used in the Ultra-Thin thread.  I would first like to try a cold ferment of one day and if needed maybe go longer in a cold ferment.

Norma
« Last Edit: July 21, 2010, 07:43:22 PM by norma427 »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Norma,

Maybe you already know from past experience what will happen when you combine cider vinegar, milk and baking soda, but I would think that you would not want to curdle the milk such that it forms cottage cheese-like curds that may be difficult to mix and blend uniformly into the dough. I would think that it would be possible simply to combine the milk, a part of the formula water (the part of the formula water not replaced by milk), salt, vinegar, honey and oil, and then add this mixture to the flour blend (KABF and regular KAWW flour), baking soda and IDY in the food processor. Doing this, you would get the individual contributions of the various ingredients.

If you really mean to sour/curdle the milk, you might want to first conduct a simple experiment to determine how much vinegar you would have to add to a known quantity of milk, by volume or weight, to get the milk to sour/curdle. While you are at it, you can determine what amount of baking soda you would need to get the soured/curdled mixture to foam. With the values of the three ingredients, one can then determine the applicable baker's percents and be able to scale the ingredients accordingly.

You mentioned honey. Do you want to use the oil and garlic powder also, as were used in the original Ultra-Thin clone dough? If you leave out the garlic powder, it will be easier for you to use the expanded dough calculating tool in case you wish to change your dough formulation based on the results of your experiments. If you'd like, you can just add the garlic powder to the rest of the ingredients since its weight will be small and not add much to the total dough weight as provided by the expanded dough calculating tool.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Peter,

I already know what will happen, when I combine apple cider vinegar, milk and baking soda.  I have done that in the past many times for cookies, breads and cakes.  When I mix, I first put the milk in a container, add vinegar until the milk starts to turn sour, (it is still very liquid, but you can see and smell when it becomes sour or sourlike, there are just a few parts of the mixture that look different) then add the baking soda, maybe a little scalding water, mixed with the baking soda  (maybe about a little over a teaspoon of scalding water). 

I think your mixing instructions are great and I will follow the same procedure I did before, (when making my attempts, I did on the clone Ultra-Thin par-baked skins), with sifting the flours and trying to get a decent final dough temperature.  I will mix all the ingredients in the food processor, and will add the oil last, then hand knead after the mixture is blended.

It isnít really sour or curdle the milk, that is just what my mother taught me, but today, you need more vinegar to sour milk (to make it like buttermilk).  Years ago, you didnít need to add much vinegar, but with how they process milk now, there needs to be more vinegar added to the milk.  I will measure out the amount of vinegar needed to sour about a cup of milk tonight and will post, how much vinegar it took for the milk to become sour.  I  will post a picture of how the sour milk should look.  I will also measure how much baking soda is needed to make one cup or a little less of milk foam.  It probably will be about a Ĺ teaspoon or less. 

I think at this point, I am going to let out the honey and if I need a longer cold ferment, then I will purchase some at market.  They have all kinds of flavors, so that could also be interesting. There are many people in our area that do maintain hives and make a living off of their honey business.

I do want to use oil in this attempt, but will let out the garlic powder for the time.  I can understand it then would be easier to use the expanded dough calculating tool.

Norma
« Last Edit: July 22, 2010, 07:31:44 AM by norma427 »
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Offline norma427

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I did a test with the milk, vinegar and baking soda.  From my results of this test I think my baking soda is weakening.  My mother once told me baking soda can be tested by this method, but I never tried it out to see if it was true.  I added 1/4 cup 2% reduced fat milk to a 1 cup measuring cup, then added 1 teaspoon of vinegar until the milk looked sour or curdled.  Then added 1/4 teaspoon baking soda.  The amount of baking soda wasnít enough to make the mixture foam, so I added another 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda to the milk and vinegar mixture.  1/4 teaspoon should have been enough, or more than enough baking soda to make the milk and vinegar mixture foam.

Pictures below of
1.  plain 2% reduced fat milk
2.  picture of sour or curdled milk
3   foaming mixture from added baking soda

Norma
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Offline norma427

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I donít know if this article has anything to do with me experimenting with using baking soda, vinegar and milk or not, but in this pdf document it says if baking soda is used in combination with an acidic agent, which could possibly be vinegar, used so the taste of the finished baking products isnít strong with the taste of adding baking soda.  This article also says baking soda is a excellent producer of CO2

http://nzic.org.nz/ChemProcesses/food/6D.pdf

Another article about using baking soda and also testing baking soda to see if it is active.
When baking soda comes in contact with an acidic ingredient and is moistened, the alkali/acid combination creates carbon dioxide (CO2), water and a neutral salt. It also renders a neutral, tasteless residue.

If the level of baking soda is too high in the recipe, it creates soapy off-notes. If the level is too low, it will allow the acidic flavors to come through. Excess levels also result in over-browning.

Baking soda (bicarbonate of soda), another chemical leavener, is used when there is an acidic ingredient in the recipe, such as vinegar, lemon juice, sour milk or buttermilk. The acid might be hidden such as in honey and molasses. 

http://www.baking911.com/pantry/leaveners.htm

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Norma,

I read the articles you referenced and they are similar to those I read a while back when we were playing around with the Ultra-Thin clone doughs. Back then, I had selected a baker's percent for the baking soda to avoid the off-note flavors that I had experienced when I used fairly large amounts to make cracker-style crusts. To avoid having the leavening effect of the baking soda peter out, I suggest that you use fairly normal amounts of yeast as one might use for a one or more days of cold fermentation.

Do you have any idea as to how much milk you want to use? The amount of milk will drive the amount of vinegar to use, and both will drive the mathematical calculations for the adjustment of the formula hydration to compensate for the water contained in the milk and vinegar. Also, since milk contains some fat, it might technically be appropriate to make adjustment to the formula oil also. Unfortunately, every time you change the amount of milk, all of the abovementioned calculations, plus a few more as noted below, have to be redone. I wouldn't worry about the high sodium content of the baking soda at this point since I anticipate that you will be using much more salt than you used when making the Ultra-Thin clone doughs. I haven't attempted any dry runs on numbers yet but if we are lucky we may find that the changes are slight and need not concern us. I will know better when you give me guidance on what portion (some or all) of the formula water you want to replace with milk.

FYI and for the record, here are some of the ingredient mathematical relationships, which should bring you absolute tears of joy:

2% reduced-fat milk: 1 c. = 244 grams; 1 t. = 5.08 grams (0.18 ounces); % water = 89.34%; % total fat = 2.05% (source: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/71/2)
Cider vinegar: 1 t. = 5 grams (0.18 ounces); % water = 94% (source: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/spices-and-herbs/217/2)
Baking soda: 1 t. = 4 grams (0.14 ounces) (source: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/baked-products/5127/2)
% of cider vinegar (1 t.) to sour the milk (1/4 c.) = 5/(244/4) = 8.2%
% of baking soda (1/2 t.) to produce foam to soured milk (1/4 c. milk + 1 t. vinegar) = 2/(5 + 61) = 3%

The baker's percents for the cider vinegar and baking soda will have to be recalculated with respect to the weight of the formula flour blend (to be able to use the expanded dough calculating tool) but those calculations will have to await guidance from you on how much milk you want to use.

Have you decided on how you would like to allocate the flour blend (KABF and regular KAWW flours) between the two flours, by percent?

I assume that for benchmark/modification purposes you plan to use the dough formulation at Reply 338 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11044.msg102799.html#msg102799, but without the garlic powder. Is that correct?

Peter

Offline norma427

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Peter,

I also saw when reading those articles that the leavening efforts of baking soda can peter out and do also believe that normal amounts of yeast should be used for this experiment.

As to address the milk, I think to start I will use the amount I just weighed today and that can be part of the formula water.  As can be seen in the vinegar I used today, that is how much should be used to get the milk sour.  Since I used whole milk today in the experiment, I will continue using this whole milk, so the oil will then have to be adjusted.  There is 8 grams of fat, in the milk that I used today. 

LOL, every time I see all those numbers you do calculations for, it does bring me tears of joy, because I donít have to do the calculations.  :'(  I guess I never understood numbers enough, and just dread dealing with numbers, unless it is something simple like bookkeeping. 

Yes, I do plan to use the same formula you set-forth at: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11044.msg102799.html#msg102799 and using the KABF at 92.5% of the blend and using the rest of the blend of KAWW at 7.5% .
I donít plan on using any garlic powder now.

I did another test on the milk, vinegar, and baking soda, again, because I was wondering if my baking soda or apple cider yeast might be weakening. Usually when apple cider vinegar gets old, it get a mother and although it didnít have a mother, I thought I needed to purchase some new apple cider vinegar because I soon would need some anyway.  I also purchased some new baking soda, in case the other baking soda was weakening.  I also bought some whole milk, because it also contains more fat.

This time when I did the test, I used my scales at home to weight the ingredients.  The whole milk was weighed at 49 grams, apple cider vinegar at 6 grams and the baking soda weight was measured at 3 grams.

Pictures below

1.  Whole Milk
2.   Milk curdled or sour with added vinegar
3.   Added baking soda to mixture of curdled or sour milk.  Mixture was then foaming.

Usually when I make this mixture for cookies, cake or bread I just measure the milk and soda the recipe calls for and then just sour or curdle the milk, with vinegar, all in volume measurements.  I know for this experiment for the modified Ultra-Thin parbaked skin, I will need to do more accurate measurements.

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Norma,

Here is the data for the whole milk:

Whole milk (3.25% milkfat): 1 c. = 244 grams; 1 t. = 5.08 grams (0.18 ounces); % water = 88.15%; % total fat = 3.28% (source: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/69/2)

If you replace the total formula water (76.03 grams) with 49 grams of whole milk (64.45% of the total formula water), its fat contribution is 49 x 3.28% = 1.61 grams. Its water content is 49 x 88.15% = 43.19 grams. The 6 grams of cider vinegar contains 6 x 98% = 5.88 grams water.

There are a lot of calculations to go through so it will take me a while to come up with a modified dough formulation. I hope that I can give you enough information to allow you to make future adjustments to the dough formulation on your own should you decide to change the amount of milk.

Peter



Offline norma427

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Peter,

Thanks for doing the numbers on the whole milk.  I can understand it will take awhile to go though the calculations to come up with a modified formula.  When the modified formula is worked out, I will try to make adjustments in the future.

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Norma,

For background purposes and to keep everything in one place as much as possible, here is the baseline dough formulation from Reply 338 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11044.msg102799.html#msg102799 that is to be modified:

Flour Blend* (100%):
Water (40.8412%):
IDY (0.011%):
Salt (0.9273%):
Olive Oil (3.27115%):
Baking Soda (0.35%):
Garlic Powder (0.40%):
Total (145.80065%):
186.16 g  |  6.57 oz | 0.41 lbs
76.03 g  |  2.68 oz | 0.17 lbs
0.02 g | 0 oz | 0 lbs | 0.01 tsp | 0 tbsp
1.73 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.31 tsp | 0.1 tbsp
6.09 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.35 tsp | 0.45 tbsp
0.65 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.16 tsp | 0.05 tbsp
0.74 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.28 tsp | 0.09 tbsp
271.42 g | 9.57 oz | 0.6 lbs | TF = 0.057978
*The Flour Blend comprises 92.5% Kyrol bleached and bromated high-gluten flour (172.20 grams/6.07 ounces) and 7.5%
KA regular whole wheat flour (13.96 grams/0.49 ounces)
Note: Dough is for a 14 1/2" skin from which a 13" skin weighing 7.70 ounces is to be cut; thickness factor = 0.057978; no bowl residue compensation factor

As previously noted, you plan to replace part of the total formula water with milk, omit the garlic powder, use cider vinegar, change the amount of baking soda, increase the amount of IDY, increase the amount of salt, and substitute KABF for the Kyrol flour. Based on the amounts of milk, vinegar and baking soda you provided, and using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, here is a proposed dough formulation for you to consider:

Flour Blend* (100%):
Water (10.14%):
IDY (0.35%):
Salt (1.75%):
Olive Oil (2.40653%):
Whole Milk (26.3214%):
Baking Soda (1.61151%):
Vinegar (3.22303%):
Total (145.80247%):
186.16 g  |  6.57 oz | 0.41 lbs
18.88 g  |  0.67 oz | 0.04 lbs
0.65 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.22 tsp | 0.07 tbsp
3.26 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.58 tsp | 0.19 tbsp
4.48 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
49 g | 1.73 oz | 0.11 lbs | 9.8 tsp | 3.27 tbsp
3 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.75 tsp | 0.25 tbsp
6 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.2 tsp | 0.4 tbsp
271.42 g | 9.57 oz | 0.6 lbs | TF = 0.057978
*The Flour Blend comprises 92.5% KABF (172.20 grams/6.07 ounces) and 7.5% regular KAWW flour (13.96 grams/0.49 ounces)
Note: Dough is for a 14 1/2" skin from which a 13" skin weighing 7.70 ounces is to be cut; thickness factor = 0.057978; no bowl residue compensation factor

You will note that the hydration percent looks strange. That is mainly because the whole milk and vinegar contribute to the total hydration in addition to the remaining formula water, all of which are specified under the standard bakerís percent format as a percent of the total formula flour (flour blend in our case). Also, whenever ingredients like IDY and salt are increased in a dough formulation (the one in Reply 338 referenced above) that produces a dough with a fixed weight (9.57 ounces in our case), the increases lower the hydration number. In this case, I particularly wanted to keep the milk, vinegar and baking soda at the values you mentioned since those values worked for you to produce a soured milk and a foamy mixture. So, when you try the dough formulation, you should pay attention to the hydration of the dough as you make it and increase the amount of water if needed to achieve a final dough condition that appears to be like what you achieved when you made the original Ultra-Thin clone dough. The fat content of the milk should add a bit of fat to the dough, and the use of the KABF instead of the Kyrol should buy you a percent or two of additional hydration. If you add more water, you will want to note how much you added so that the information might be used to adjust the dough formulation for future purposes. When time comes to use the dough, you may find that you will need to use your proofing box to warm up the dough sufficiently to be able to roll it out more easily. If it turns out that the amount of yeast produces a more gassy dough when time comes to roll it out, I think you should be OK since the rolling process should force out the gases, and the two cutter pans should restrain the final skin (13") during par-baking.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 25, 2010, 04:43:43 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline norma427

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Peter,

Thank you for setting forth the formula for me to try for the modified Ultra-Thin par-baked skin.  I can see the hydration does look strange, but can understand why.  I didnít know whenever ingredients like Idy and salt are increased in the dough formulation, then those increases would then lower the hydration number, but can see how it could decrease the hydration, because they are dry ingredients.  I will pay attention to the hydration of the dough and if I need to increase the water to be able to get the same looking dough as the last attempt I made of the Ultra-Thin par-baked skin, I will note any changes, if they are needed.  I believe I will need to use the proofing box to warm up the dough, after a one day cold ferment, because the dough is still a low hydration dough and I want to be able to roll this dough without having arms that get too tired.  I could see when I played around with the preferment for the Lehmann dough that one day at market just to see what would happen, I could even roll out that gassy dough and get it quite thin, so I think this dough formula should be okay while rolling it out. 

I probably will mix the dough on Saturday, cold ferment for one day and try to par-baked a modified skin on Sunday. 

The only other question I have right now is in the first formula in post #9, why is there baking powder there along with the baking soda, when there wasnít any in the other formula?

I am curious to see if this modified par-bake skin, will taste better, when baking it into a pizza.

Norma
« Last Edit: July 22, 2010, 03:24:05 PM by norma427 »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Norma,

Shoehorning a new methodology into an existing dough formulation can do some strange things to the dough formulation. I could have used a higher formula hydration but that would have changed the values of the milk, vinegar and baking soda. If changed too much, it is possible that the combination wouldn't work as intended. Since the combination you used worked, I decided to stick with that and instruct you to adjust the formula hydration if needed. In this case, I kept changing the hydration value in the hydration box in the expanded dough calculating tool until the values for the milk, vinegar and baking soda were the values you gave me. If the dough formulation shows promise but needs to be modified to increase its hydration based on your experience with the dough formulation, we might be able to do that even though it might reduce the amounts of milk, vinegar and baking soda. However, the reduced values will still have to work, which is probable if the values aren't reduced too much. We can jump off of that bridge when we get to it  :-D.

With respect to the baking powder in the first dough formulation I posted in my last reply, that was an error and has been corrected. When I originally created the dough formulation in Reply 338, I used the "baking powder" entry in the expanded dough calculating tool as a proxy for the garlic powder, which is not an ingredient listed in that tool. Once I got the text output from the tool, I changed "baking powder" to "garlic powder" and corrected the volume measurements. It's a trick I came up with some time ago when I want to use the tool with an ingredient that is not listed in the tool.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Peter,

I can see shoehorning can do some strange things to a dough formulation.  I have used shoehorns years ago, when my shoes didnít fit right and saw how things could work out in the end. When I looked at hydration it about jumped off the page at me. :o  I still donít know how you do all those modifications in the expanded dough calculating tool.  I hope we donít have to jump off too many bridges this time. 

Your trick was good for using the baking powder and then changing it to garlic powder.

Thanks again,

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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I still donít know how you do all those modifications in the expanded dough calculating tool. 

Norma,

I did the basic conceptual design of the expanded dough calculating tool (and the other tools as well), with the help of Mike (Boy Hits Car), so I understand how the tools work and can be manipulated. However, without Mike's programming expertise, the tools would never have seen the light of day. That means we wouldn't have been able to come up with the the preferment Lehmann dough formulation, which is a core part of your business at market, or the dough formulations for the Mack's clones and the Utra-Thin experiments, including the version now under consideration. Unless someone else showed up to bail us out, we would be working from spreadsheets and the like. Mike rescued me from my spreadsheets, which are now retired and living in Florida.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Peter,

I appreciate that Mike and you came up with the expanded dough calculating tool and the others, as I am sure other members also are. I really like the preferment Lehmann dough formulation and can see how the other formulas I have been using never would have come about if it wasnít for those tools.  I can use the tools, but when it comes to making the manipulations, I would be lost.

As for me, I never could see myself working from a spreadsheet.  Your spreadsheets are lucky to be retired and living in Florida.  I wonder if they appreciate being retired and living in Florida, as much as you do.  I am sure you also are happy that you donít have to use the spreadsheets anymore.

I can see how this whole forum evolved over time and how all the tools made it easier for everyone that wants to try making pizzas.   :)

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Norma,

The post that I think changed the forum in a very significant way is Reply 32 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3399.msg28963.html#msg28963, where Mike volunteered to create a tool that was to replace my Lehmann spreadsheet, which I had theretofore used to come up with dough formulations requested by our members. That was almost four years ago. Once Mike programmed the Lehmann dough calculating tool, we decided to work on the other tools. It took us months to design them and to beta test them among a select number of our members before they were rolled out. Their feedback was highly instrumental in making the tools better.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Peter,

That whole thread is very interesting.  I have not seen that thread before.  I see even Lombardiís was inconsistent in their pizzas.  It also seems like forum members even back in 2006 had problems finding the right flour, sauce and cheese, just like today.  I can see back then, that forum members, including Mike were asking you for assistance in their dough formulas. 

Going back four years, you were still wanting to reverse-engineer doughs and looking about what chemicals that might be used in the dough and trying to finds ways to strip out the chemicals to make a more natural type of pie.

Mike seems like such a generous man, also and was just learning to make pizzas in that thread.  He didnít even have a scale at that point in time.  Did he ever post how he made out in making the Lombardi pie?  I appreciate all the work he did in combination with you to make this forum so much easier to use, in creating the dough tools.  The select members that also tried out the tools, were also very helpful in changing how this forum went on from that point in time. I can now see how happy you were to retire your spreadsheet and have real tools to work with.  I also would like to thank Mike for helping you.  Without him, I never would have been able to figure out anything.

Evelyne seems like a very knowledgeable lady about everything that has to do with pizzas. She even had knowledge of pizzas from the fifties on and was going to an interview with Tom Lehmann. I also had to laugh at Evelyne throwing the pizza away in the trash can, when she thought it wasnít up to standards. She is also feisty and honest, which I like in a person, because they are the kind of people that stick up for their rights and rights of others. She also thought heat is a fascinating and complicated subject.

As canadave reported, even Joeís pizza slipped, once Giuseppe himself stopped making the pizzas, Was that the famous Joeís pizza in NY? 

I had to laugh when bolabola said a par cooked pie was a mortal sin in his book.

Thanks for referencing that thread, I totally enjoyed it.  There are so many threads on this forum, that I never have read and with all the new posts each day, it is hard to keep up with everything.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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I wanted to try this new formula for the modified Ultra-Thin par-bake skin, so I mixed the dough today.  I sifted the two flours and weighed out all the ingredients., leaving the mix of milk, vinegar and soda until second to last.  I used my Hamilton Beach Food Processor to mix the ingredients and added the mixture of foaming milk, vinegar and soda after I added the other ingredients to the food processor.  I mixed and then did an additional mix for the Olive oil. All these mixes were on pulse. I used a spatula, spoon and knife to get all the dough off the blade and plastic container of the food processor. The finished dough temperature was 80 degrees F.  The mixture was dry and then I put the mixture into a mixing bowl and hand kneaded.  I then formed the dough into a ball and used Olive oil to coat the dough, so the skin wouldnít dry out, when using the proofing box.  The dough is going to cold ferment for 24 hrs.  The final weight of the dough ball was 270 grams, with the additional olive oil added to coat the dough ball.

I used my regular kitchen scale to weigh out the ingredients.  I am going to market this afternoon, so I will bring the better scales home, to use tomorrow.

Norma
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Since I am trying to get a better crust flavor, when baking this modified Ultra-Thin skin, I  have watched the dough since I mixed it yesterday.  This morning I looked at the dough ball in the refrigerator and it still looked the same as when I placed it there, except it has turned darker in color.  I really didnít except this dough ball to rise, since it has such a low hydration.

I decided to take the dough ball out of the refrigerator and let it sit at room temperature, before I do the proof in the proofing box.

Since we are supposed to have very hot temperatures in our area today, I want to do the bake of this  par-baked skin as quickly as I possibly can.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline norma427

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I let the dough ball sit out at room temperature (82 degrees F) for 5 hours.  It was covered.  The proofing box was then left to warm-up.  The oven was preheated to 400 degrees F.  I had oiled the dough again, before putting it into the proofing box.  I changed the bulb in the proofing box and left the dough to proof for 1 Ĺ hrs at 118 degrees F in combination with very hot water in another container. 

I could tell this dough ball was going to be harder to roll out, than my last attempt.  It seemed so dry and I could tell there was a crust on the dough ball.  I used my heaviest rolling pin, from market, to roll out this dough.  At first I thought, there is no way this dough is going to be able to be rolled out, but I proceeded.  It took me 17 minutes to roll out this dough into a skin. My first thought was, I should have added more water to the mixture, but I wanted to see how this dough would work out, with the hydration that was given in the formula.  It didnít look or feel that much different when I was hand kneading or forming it into a ball. 

The crust on the dough kept being there in some places even after I rolled so much.  I guess since the dough was so dry, there wasnít enough hydration to absorb the dryness of the skin that formed on the dough. I docked the dough, but not as heavily as the last times.  I just docked across the dough one time, for all the diameter. (about 2 Ĺ swipes).

I used the same method to be sure the skin weighed 7.70 oz, in using the scales and just using a scissors to cut the edges off, until the skin weighed 7.70 oz. 

I sprayed the top of the skin heavier when it had been placed on the one cutter pan, because I wanted the skin to stay moist enough while par-baking.  I kept monitoring the temperature of the skin and although, I did it frequently, the temperature was still 189 degrees F, when I removed it from the oven.  The finished weight of the par-baked skin was 7.4 oz. 

In conclusion, this par-baked skin did work out in terms of making a par-baked skin and having the flexibility of a par-baked skin, like the real Ultra-Thin par-baked skin.  The only part I didnít like about this par-baked skin so far, was it was too hard to roll out.  I did taste some of the leftover dough and I could taste the added salt.  At least it doesnít take very long for the oven to come up to temperature and it doesnít take long to par-bake a skin, so the temperature of the kitchen didnít get too bad.

video of par-baked skin

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5jPRwsOaC8" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5jPRwsOaC8</a>


Pictures below

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


 

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