Author Topic: I built a manual dough sheeter  (Read 113 times)

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Offline leviran1

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I built a manual dough sheeter
« on: May 27, 2015, 08:38:39 PM »
Hello to all dough lovers,

Been following the old the thread for the manual dough sheeter established by Jet_Deck more than two years ago.
Mainly looking to find out a solution for a manual dough sheeter for my wife.

My wife is a baker in her profession. Two years ago she decided to try farmers markets and see how it goes.
Part of her product offerings included preparing hard yeast dough which required a lot of manual labor in thinning the dough as well as preparing it.
Back then I started looking for some manual dough sheeters that might be able to assist in this job.

Finding nothing on the market for under the $500 mark, I came across that thread which inspired me to also try and build my own.
Initial  thought was that I can build this cheap enough while making it robust enough to handle yeast dough.
Looking at the design done by Jet_Deck I thought some of his ideas are brilliant and simple to implement while others are too complicated for me (main thing being having no experience in welding nor do I own welding equipment).
So I had to come up with a design that would be simple enough to implement but will not require any welding.

Initial design was made using SketchUp than had some parts ordered.
However, as life events happened, it took me longer than expected to complete this project (almost two years...) so only now I'm actually able to post some pictures of the almost finished product.
My wife is no longer attending Farmers Markets so the pressure to complete this project dropped down a bit, but I still had the internal drive to try and complete it mainly for proving myself that my design worked and that I can actually complete this project.
Making the sheeter robust and  Farmers Market scale, I built this with 18" aluminum rollers. The end result came quite big...
If I were to build this again I would probably use 15" rollers instead and make the entire build a little bit smaller.

Altogether after all materials purchased I wouldn't say it was a cheap enough setup (definitely not as cheap as Jet_Deck indicated on his build), but on my defense, I had to buy all materials and tools for this, my lack of experience did not help when I purchased some over quantity for some of the items and unused other items. Considering all materials I would say this cost me at about $450 USD spent over these past two years.

Some little fine details are still missing, as a result of our first "wet run", we realized that it is extremely uncomfortable to use this without trays at each end, so I still have to fabricate those. The other thing is that I used chair felt pads at the bottom of the sheeter to protect the counter from Aluminum scratches. This needs to be replaced with rubber padding to prevent movement (I'm waiting for these in the mail now).


Posting some pictures for your entertainment and judgement, appreciate any opinions and thoughts you might have.


Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: I built a manual dough sheeter
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2015, 09:54:45 PM »
COOL!
How about springing for another $60.00 or so for a 12-V starter, like they use on the Briggs & Stratton 12 to 17-H.P. riding lawn mower engines. Mounted directly to the frame and replacing the hand crank it could be operated off of a marine battery all day long making a hard job even easier.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline jvp123

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Re: I built a manual dough sheeter
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2015, 10:59:02 PM »
COOL!
How about springing for another $60.00 or so for a 12-V starter, like they use on the Briggs & Stratton 12 to 17-H.P. riding lawn mower engines. Mounted directly to the frame and replacing the hand crank it could be operated off of a marine battery all day long making a hard job even easier.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

 ^^^
Jeff

Offline leviran1

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Re: I built a manual dough sheeter
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 01:38:42 AM »
I actually thought of connecting electric motor to this.
If at all, it would be connected to the top sprocket hanging from the two rails.
The other hesitation I had with connecting a motor is that there is a good chance of the dough sticking to the lower or top rollers thus making it hard to control when this thing run on auto mode.

I think the torque on the Briggs & Stratton motor would be an overkill on the sheeter (not to mention the weight)  ::)...
But this is also where my lack of experience with dough sheeters comes into play, we have not yet used it on "hard" dough so not sure exactly how difficult would it be to turn the crank.

I do have however some pictures from the test we did to share.