Author Topic: Manual Dough Sheeter  (Read 56524 times)

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Offline vtsteve

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #100 on: November 17, 2013, 01:03:11 AM »
Ryan, I'll take a crack at this:

1. The chain is on the inside because the sprockets are screwed to the ends of the rolling pins. Since the rolling pins have internal bearings and ride on a shaft (which originally ran between  the handles), torque has to be applied directly to the wooden body of the pin. The upper shaft is cranked because there's no other way to get power (through the plates) to the chain.

2. The photos in Reply #65 show that where the inner plates have a hole for the upper rolling pin shaft, the outer plates have a slot. On the bottom, the inner plates are slotted, and the side plates have holes for the lower shaft. When the rolling pins are in place, the shafts are constrained by the matching slots and can only move in a straight line, closer or farther apart.

3. Behind the round discs, the inner plates have another slot (and the outer plates have holes). The shaft passes through the disc off-center, so when the shaft is rotated, the disc "wobbles". The stop blocks visible in Reply #76, welded above and below the discs, convert that wobble into linear motion, forcing the rollers together or apart. The discs need to be 'timed' on the shaft, with Top Dead Center the same on both ends, or the rollers won't stay parallel.

4. (partial credit) The green arm is a tensioner for the chain. Tightening the bolt at upper right (and locking it in place) pushes the idler sprocket up and tightens the chain.

5. The green disc is a close-up of the ball detent that holds the rollers in place (against the pressure of the dough) until you move the thickness adjustment handle. I believe that the spoon taped to the handle of the locking pliers in Reply #78 is serving the same function  :-D  In Reply #82, it looks like there's a jam nut between the handle and the plates (just snugged) to hold the thickness until you change it.

- Steve
In grams we trust. :)


Offline bbqchuck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #101 on: November 17, 2013, 08:06:13 AM »
I ran across this on ebay.  $569 isn't cheap.  But all the messing around building one may not be either.
http://m.ebay.com/itm/111210030629




Offline bbqchuck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #103 on: November 17, 2013, 08:13:45 AM »
This 12" slip roller is a cheap and easy way to go
http://m.ebay.com/itm/390692545180?nav=SEARCH&sbk=1

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #104 on: November 17, 2013, 01:42:24 PM »
Ryan, I'll take a crack at this:

1. The chain is on the inside because the sprockets are screwed to the ends of the rolling pins. Since the rolling pins have internal bearings and ride on a shaft (which originally ran between  the handles), torque has to be applied directly to the wooden body of the pin. The upper shaft is cranked because there's no other way to get power (through the plates) to the chain.

I think I figured that one out shortly after I asked the question. Not sure if I figured out any of the other stuff, though (because it's been a while since I thought about any of this stuff).

Thanks for your help.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline leviran1

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #105 on: May 24, 2015, 08:01:28 PM »
Hi,

Been following this old thread for more than two years now. Mainly looking to find out a solution for a manual dough sheeter for my wife.

My wife is a baker in her profession. Two years ago she decided to try farmers markets and see how it goes.
Part of her product offerings included preparing products made from hard yeast dough which required a lot of manual labor in thinning the dough as well as preparing it.
Back then I started looking for some manual dough sheeters that might be able to assist in this job.

Finding nothing on the market for under the $500 mark, I came across this thread which inspired me to also try and build my own.
Initial  thought was that I can build this cheap enough while making it robust enough to handle yeast dough.
Looking at the design done by Jet_Deck I thought some of his ideas are brilliant and simple to implement while others are too complicated for me (main thing being I have no experience in welding nor do I own welding equipment).
So I had to come up with a design that would be simple enough to implement but will not require any welding.

Initial design was made using SketchUp than had some parts ordered, however, as life events happened, it took me longer than expected to complete this project (almost two years...) so only now I'm actually able to post some pictures of the almost finished product.
My wife is no longer attending Farmers Markets so the pressure to complete this project dropped down a bit, but I still had the internal drive to try and complete it mainly for proving myself that my design works and that I can complete this project.
Making the sheeter robust and  Farmers Market scale, I built this with 18" aluminum rollers. The end result came out big...
If I were to build this again I would probably use 15" rollers instead and make the entire build a little bit smaller.

Altogether after all materials purchased I wouldn't say it was a cheap enough setup (definitely not as cheap as Jet_Deck indicated on his build), but on my defense, I had to buy all materials and tools for this, my lack of experience did not help when I purchased some over quantity of some items and unused other items. Considering all materials I would say this cost me at about $450 USD spent over these past two years.

Some little fine details are still missing, as a result of last night wet run, we realized that it is extremely uncomfortable to use this without trays at each end, so I still have to fabricate those. The other thing is that I used the chair felt pads at the bottom of the sheeter to protect the counter from Aluminum scratches. This needs to be replaced with rubber padding to prevent movement (I'm waiting for these in the mail now).


Posting some pictures for your entertainment and judgement, appreciate any opinions and thoughts you might have.